logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: thornton
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2019-12-01 21:55
Freebie Kid book round up
Champ and Nessie - Zebulan Frayne,Sherry Frayne
The 12 Days of a Great White Christmas - Chris Bresky,Chris Bresky
I Spy Christmas: I Spy Christmas Book for Kids - J. K. Nawara
The Sun and the Moon - Kibaek Jeon,Nayun Kim
Jade's Life Skills Series - Learning Manners or To Fart Or Not To Fart (Children's Life Skills Series) - Asaf Shani
What The Fox Learnt: Four Fables from Aesop - Aesop,Ripple Digital Publishing
Unicrosn, Magic, and Slime - Misty Black
Diaries of a Dragon - Beatriz Rare
Once Upon and Ever After - Caroline L. Thornton
Sophia and the Popcorn Dragon - Tommy Walker

Stand outs in this group are

 

12 Days of Great White Christmas - parody of the 12 days using sharks.  It includes a fact section at the end.  It's quite well done and fun. 5 stars.

 

Diaries of a Dragon - I wasn't sure about this one, but the artwork and the story match each other pretty darn well. It was sweet. 3.5 stars

 

Once Upon and Ever After - most likely the best of this batch.  5 stars.  It deals with how the prince is affected by sterotypes as well as princesses.

 

What the Fox Learnt - pretty good retellings of Aesop tales about foxes.  Three stars.

 

Champ and Nessie - actually makes good use of Nessie and Champ to teach about earth history. 3 stars

 

Sun and the Moon - good retelling of the Korean tale.  3 stars

 

Sophia and the Popcorn Dragon - a bit too cute, but woc so that was cool.  3 stars.

 

Unicorns, Magic and Slime -predictable but fun.  3 stars

 

Dollhouse Elf -(not pictured) not bad, predictable. 

 

To be missed

 

The farting book - the whole thing about dad working around in his boxers was a bit strange.

 

I Spy - the word scarf is missed spell.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2019-11-10 04:44
American Princess
American Princess: A Novel of First Daughter Alice Roosevelt - Stephanie Marie Thornton

This is not my first Alice Roosevelt book. I have to admit, I am drawn to books about this quirky White house daughter, the rebel badass, and, despite the fact that I once considered Eleanor the best of the Roosevelts, I have to think that Alice was the most true to herself. In previous books I’ve read about her though, she was depicted as a spirited girl bent on hijinks—with no particular care for the lives of those around her. This book added a depth to her character that I didn’t feel before, and considered the compromises she made in love and life, going beyond the typical scandals that are recalled when Alice is the topic. I was moved by the story of the years following her mother’s death, her relationship with her father, and the idea that America’s Sweetheart seemed so unlucky in her choices for love. Regardless of that, Alice lived the life she wanted to live, her unequivocal independence and life of the mind so contrary to the prevailing norms, and an example still, of how to get the very most out of life.

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2019-11-04 15:35
Highly recommended to Brontës fans and to early XIX century historians
The Mother of the Brontës: When Maria Met Patrick - Sharon Wright

Thanks to Rosie Croft from Pen & Sword for sending me an early hardback copy of this book, which I freely chose to review.

Despite being a fan of the Brontës, having visited Haworth, and read about them (although I’m no expert), on seeing this book I realised I didn’t know much about their mother, other than she had died when they were very young. The author explains quite well why that is the case, as there seems to be very little trace of her, other than some letters she wrote to her then husband-to-be, Patrick, and a religious tract she wrote. There are also comments and memories collected by others, mostly by those writing the biographies of her famous daughters, but little dedicated solely to her. I am grateful to the author for putting that to rights. She has done a great job, digging factual information about Maria Branwell, compiling written records (be it newspaper cuttings, diaries written by neighbours or social connections, correspondence and accounts by others), introducing and interpreting the few writings we have by Maria herself, and pulling together information about the era and the places where the family lived to help readers place the family as actors and social beings in the period and the locations where they lived.  The level of detail is just right, as well. Wright explains how dangerous and dreary the trip from Penzance to Yorkshire would have been in the early XIX century, the unrest in Yorkshire due to the Industrial Revolution and the machines replacing workers (the Luddites had much to say about that, although their actions didn’t have any long-term impact), and the differences in the social settings of Penzance and Thornton, for example, but these explanations never detract from the story. Rather the opposite; they make it all the more compelling.

I don’t want to go into too much detail and spoil the enjoyment of the many interested readers, but I thought I’d share some of the things I noted as I went along. I’ve already mentioned that Maria was from Penzance, but it seems that her father and the rest of the family were likely involved in smuggling (that, to be fair, seems to have been an almost universal occupation in the area). Hers was a large family, and to illustrate just how hard life was at the time, although they were fairly well off, five of her siblings died before they got to adulthood. Religion played an important part in her life, and it’s only fitting that she would end up marrying a priest. She knew Humphry Davy (later Sir Humphry Davy) when she was young, her life was quite full and she was well-connected in Penzance, so we get a sense of how much she must have loved her husband to sacrifice all that to follow him in his career moves, and also what a change in her circumstances she must have experienced. She was a keen reader, and their love of books was one of the things likely to bring her and Patrick together, and it is clear from her letters that she was a good (and even passionate at times) writer, with a sense of humour. She was a woman of her time, and although she had the confidence of those around her, she wished for a life-long companion to support her and guide her in accordance to the norms of the time and as we can see from her own religious tract, her ideas (or at least those she expressed in writing for the public) were pretty conventional. I was gripped by the difficulties Patrick had to face to get the post as priest in Haworth. It seems they were not fond of being told what to do or who to choose there, and he renounced twice to his position before everybody was finally in agreement with his nomination.

I was fascinated by the comments of the author about women’s diarists and their importance to get to understand what everyday life was like at the time. Men of the period wrote the official history, but they hardly ever took the time to note the little details, those we are truly interested in, that help us bring to life a particular era. I am particularly fond of the entries from the diary of Elizabeth Firth, one of the Brontës’ neighbours. My favourite must be: “We sat up expecting the Radicals.” For your peace of mind I’ll let you know that it seems they never came. Wright also defends the importance of the local press, as again they are the ones that keep records of those things that are not considered notice-worthy by big publications, but help make a community what it is. She laments the demise of many of those papers, and I could not agree more.

The book includes two appendixes with the full text of Maria’s letters and also her religious article titled “The Advantages of Poverty in Religious Concerns.” There is also an index with all the texts the author has consulted when writing this book, and I am sure people interested in learning more about the Brontës will find plenty of material there. There are also a number of illustrations, mostly photographs from the houses and locations mentioned in the book, some portraits and illustration, and also a recreation of what Patrick and Maria might have looked like on their wedding day (that I loved).

I recommend this book to anybody interested in the Brontës, in the history of Haworth and Thornton, and in the history of the early XIX century England, especially those who, like me, enjoy getting transported to the era and having a sense of what life was really like then. A deserved homage to a woman whose heritage was so important and so little acknowledged.

Like Reblog Comment
review 2019-08-18 05:05
clear aligners cost in india
Aliens Don't Wear Braces - Debbie Dadey,Marcia Thornton Jones

A great smile is worth a fortune. It shouldn't cost one.

High-quality orthodontic care, at never before price. Clear aligners cost starts at just ₹75,000/- only in India or EMI as low as ₹ 4999/-*

 

 

To more about braces or smile treatment visit our websites.https://www.32watts.com

 

 

Source: www.32watts.com/clear-aligners-cost-in-india.html
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2019-04-20 00:24
American Princess
American Princess: A Novel of First Daughter Alice Roosevelt - Stephanie Marie Thornton

Alice Roosevelt is a force to be reckoned with. From the moment her father took office, Alice knew that she would make a mark on the world. However, impressing Theodore Roosevelt is a monumental task. Alice lives according to her own rules and the beliefs that her father has instilled upon her. Alice makes waves in Washington from her teenage years through adulthood, even when a Roosevelt is not in office. Alice would love to find love, but that aspect of her life seems to continuously fall through the cracks. As Alice survives the years and the ups and downs of Washington, she make friends and enemies but is respected by all.

I love learning about lesser known historical figures. I of course knew about Theodore Roosevelt and the many things that he had accomplished while in office. I have even visited the site where the book begins. However, I have not heard much about Alice except for a few quotes. From the moment the Roosevelt's find out that Theodore will be President, I knew that I would like Alice. Her character has immeasurable strength and conviction that is paired with a wildness that makes everything more exciting. I was surprised at the many things that Alice was able to accomplish both large and small- from having a color named after her to helping her father with international relations, Alice was influential in both the social and political spheres. While Alice's public life was filled with escapades, her personal life was just as engrossing. Her relationship with Nicholas Longworth would be fodder for every tabloid if she were alive today. I was endeared by Alice's quest to please her father. Written with careful detail to historical records, American Princess creates a rich and riveting story of Alice Roosevelt Longworth, a woman who earned the title of Princess and The Other Washington Monument throughout her life. 

This book was received for free in return for an honest review.

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?