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review 2018-09-14 15:59
Hah!
Magic Triumphs - Ilona Andrews

Really, what else is there to say about the closing of a saga worth it's salt?

 

Ok... Fast paced wrap up choke-full of badass moments, everyone gets a scene bit or at least a name check and the last solution reeked of poetic justice with a good dose of deus-ex-machina (heheh). Plus all the mommy moments that were hilarious, dysfunctional, messed up and all around weird, or awesome, or blood-thirsty, or all of the above, lol.

 

Now, for all the bits that I can't comment without spoiling

 

I'm never, ever, no matter how many times the books name him, will stop grinning at Teddy Jo's name.

Luther. And Roman. And Beau Clayton. Come on, they are so awesome.

Kate's "we are a family of monsters" acceptance moment, when she gives up on trying to shield Conlan from violence and decides to go with "but we are the most violent BAMFs around, so you are safe".

Hugh having a second Conclave crashing moment.

Kate and Hugh having their "yeap, we are siblings indeed and dad sucks" chat.

On that vein, Kate and Nicks vaguely siblingly but even more combative relationship too (seriously, this family!)

The muggle Lt stepping up with "what do you need?" and all the muggle forces showing.

Saiman, why?

Julie and Erra leaving to have their own adventures after a visit to grandma? So want to see

(spoiler show)

 

Oh, lookie, I just busted my yearly challenge

 

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review 2018-09-12 04:14
The Geek Feminist Revolution
The Geek Feminist Revolution - Kameron Hurley

I really enjoyed this essay collection, especially the first section that aimed its focus on writers (and artists in general). It genuinely inspired me. The collection as a whole gives some great insight into many things but most especially focuses on feminist topics, privilege, the writing industry, geek culture, and Hurley herself. At times it was repetitive, as the essays can stand on their own and as a result they occasionally retreaded some basic groundwork. It's best read in chunks over time so the repetition feels less intrusive and the information can be digested. All in all I really liked this one, and I'm looking forward to more Kameron Hurley in my life.

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review 2018-09-07 17:00
‘Enchantée’ will sweep you off your feet and take you back to 18th-century Paris; this historical fantasy is rich with magic, romance, and even some actual events
Enchantée - Gita Trelease

*Warning: words en Francais may appear sporadically.

 

This book is…enchanting. I didn’t have it on my radar until quite simply everyone seemed to be asking about this novel about two sisters living in Paris during the French Revolution, one with the gift of magic, and with the desperate need to get themselves out of the dire situation they are in. They are poor, with Camille using her magie to turn pieces of metal they find in the dirt into coins, while Sophie is ailing, weak with a terrible cough. Their brother Alain is a drunkard and cruel, deeply in debt from his gambling, and the sisters just dream of finding a home away from their brother, Sophie perhaps marrying into aristocracy and money, while Camille has dreams of owning a print shop like her deceased father once did.

 

I’m not usually swept up into a book such as this, one that is a spell-binding combination of magic, romance, historical fiction, and fantasy, but although it’s a long book (some parts seemed overly long, and I felt like the whole thing could have been quite a bit shorter), I was entranced by the characters, as well as the setting.

 

Author Gita Trelease has painted a vivid portrait of Paris in the 18th century in ‘Enchantée’, when the contrast between the rich and the poor was stark, and Marie Antoinette was taking court. Readers will be pleased to know that they will served up ‘beacoup de’ servings of what it was like to live as a French aristocrat at that time, as Camille takes on a new persona, as the Baroness de la Fontaine, when she uses her ‘magie glamoire’ to gain entry to Versailles to play and turn cards. While there she rubs elbows with the rich she would otherwise detest, but ends up making friends as she makes enough money to change things for herself and Sophie. She internally struggles with her use of magie and the differences between the rich and the poor at that time, even though she is using it to change her fortune.

 

There’s a ‘rags-to-riches’/Cinderella tale here, a face-off between the handsome suitors (the handsome, devilish rogue, Seguin, and the more reserved but romantic ingenue, Lazare). The book provides a wonderful look at the culture of the time (I absolutely loved all the research obviously done regarding the use of hot-air balloons; that was probably my favorite part), as well as our protagonist wrestling with so many ideals and virtues. This gives a fantastic deeper edge to the book, and gives a real nod to climate preceding the Revolution. The poverty that was experienced by the ‘poor’ thanks to the disparity created by taxes and wheat prices, is fervently clear throughout, and it’s the thing that drives Camille all the way through her saga at Versailles, and pushes her use her magie. But the question is always, is it worth it? And does this make her just like the aristo? I think the answers are a bit murky at the end, despite the ‘happy ending’.

 

I would very much imagine that many of those who have fallen particularly for the setting of belle Paris, have not had the privilege, like myself, of visiting France, and may not even speak much French; the book is addled with short French phrases, for which, Trelease has put a glossary in the back of the book. It may remove a little enjoyment to keep looking things up, if you don’t know the meaning of those words, but my guess is you have rudimentary French knowledge to have interest in the book in the first place. I appreciate the explanation of all the historical facts and figures as they appear in the book, as they are fascinating.

 

The pace of the book picks up rapidly at about half way through the book, which I felt could have been a lot plus rapide; I feel as though a historical fiction/romance is a bit extravagant at close to 500 pages. If you’re looking for a book with lots of action and adventure, this one isn’t it, and thanks to the coy teasing nature of the romantic flirting, even that isn’t super juicy and doesn’t take up a wild amount of those pages. But of the ones that it does, they’re not overdone or too sickly sweet.

 

‘Enchantée’ is a fabulous romantic story set in Revolutionary France and I’d say ‘vas-y’ (that means go for it), if you’re enamored by historical romance at all. This has a sumptuous setting, unique voice, and made a change in all the YA I’d read lately.


By the way, Paris remains one of my most favorite cities today; take a plane and read ‘Enchantée on the way (sorry that you have to wait until February for it, malheureusement)!

 

Source: www.goodreads.com/book/show/36613718-enchant-e
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review 2018-09-06 01:54
Deserves the Hype
His Majesty's Dragon - Naomi Novik

I did not expect to enjoy this as much as I did.

 

Beyond the absolutely endearing dragon (and a book-lover dragon at that, how can you pack more win?) and the lovely friendship with Laurence, the setting goes into many issues I would not have expected it to, but that would be the logical result of dragons existing, being intelligent, and drafted into the military.

 

It made me laugh, and think, and I mowed through most of it in one sitting. Full stars.

 

 

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review 2018-08-21 00:15
Review: Disciple of the Gods (The Theurgy Revolution #2)
Discipline of the Gods (The Theurgy Revolution 2) - James Val'Rose

ISBN: 9781999881405

 

Self-published

 

Synopsis:

Awakening in a strange new world – red lights flashing by themselves, doors opening on their own, lights existing behind walls – Jerome wonders where it all went wrong. Under the scrutiny of Tathism, a new and fanatical religion, he wonders what happened to end the eight years of happiness. Reunited with his old friends, all of whom seem bound by immortality, he tries to accept this new world. However, The Reformation is eager to put to right the mistakes of the past.

Now, with Tathites and The Reformation determined to find them, the group must make a choice – whether to try and find a way home, or remain drifters in the void of time. However is the choice even their own? Or is it really the calling of a deeper, otherworldly future…?

 

Review:

This second volume of The Theurgy Revolution is a book I have been anticipating since the epic first volume appeared on my best reads of 2014. The wonderful cast of characters from the author's first novel are personalities that really sprang to life from the pages, so I had been wondering all this time what their fate would be.

Jerome is a beautifully written character totally lost in the world he has awoken into, everyday objects that we take for granted are described perfectly. As the story progresses and the Tathites make themselves known, the author's use of complex language again comes into play and makes me use my brain (and google!).

I don't want to give the plot of this sequel away, but meeting some familiar characters, the fascinating play between the different personalities and finding out unforseen secrets are all highlights. Personally, I cannot wait for volume 3 as I am dying to find out what happens next!


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