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review 2018-05-17 22:43
Where Angels Fear to Tread
Where Angels Fear To Tread - E.M. Forster

For the dead, who seem to take away so much, really take with them nothing that is ours. The passion they have aroused lives after them, easy to transmute or to transfer, but well-nigh impossible to destroy.

I love Forster's writing. So, much so that to celebrate it I got myself a whole new set of lovely, matching editions of his novels recently.

 

Where Angels Fear to Tread was his first novel (published in 1905), and re-reading it this time I can see how this is very much a first novel, and why it has never impressed me on previous reads. You see, I came to Forster by way of Howards End, his fourth novel (published in 1910), and that reading experience set the bar vary, VERY high for any other book that was to follow, especially any other book by Forster.

 

This time, I read the book from a much altered perspective on life, but I still found the plot rather stilted and the characters simply unbearable - apart from Miss Abbott. Forster's message - which is quite daring for its time! - gets a little lost in the characters' bickering. Sure, there are some signs of great character study and an underlying satire of English and Italian society, but the characters are also really annoying. A satire is something I want to enjoy reading, the people in this story I just wanted to shove off the train. 

 

There was one scene, however that I absolutely adore:

“You are wonderful!” he said gravely.

“Oh, you appreciate me!” she burst out again. “I wish you didn’t. You appreciate us all—see good in all of us. And all the time you are dead—dead—dead. Look, why aren’t you angry?” She came up to him, and then her mood suddenly changed, and she took hold of both his hands. “You are so splendid, Mr Herriton, that I can’t bear to see you wasted. I can’t bear—she has not been good to you—your mother.”

“Miss Abbott, don’t worry over me. Some people are born not to do things. I’m one of them; I never did anything at school or at the Bar. I came out to stop Lilia’s marriage, and it was too late. I came out intending to get the baby, and I shall return an ‘honourable failure’. I never expect anything to happen now, and so I am never disappointed. You would be surprised to know what my great events are. Going to the theatre yesterday, talking to you now—I don’t suppose I shall ever meet anything greater. I seem fated to pass through the world without colliding with it or moving it—and I’m sure I can’t tell you whether the fate’s good or evil. I don’t die—I don’t fall in love. And if other people die or fall in love they always do it when I’m not there. You are quite right: life to me is just a spectacle, which—thank God, and thank Italy, and thank you—is now more beautiful and heartening than it has ever been before.”

She said solemnly, “I wish something would happen to you, my dear friend; I wish something would happen to you.”

“But why?” he asked, smiling. “Prove to me why I don’t do as I am.”

She also smiled, very gravely. She could not prove it. No argument existed. Their discourse, splendid as it had been, resulted in nothing, and their respective opinions and policies were exactly the same when they left the church as when they had entered it.

There is an understatement in that scene that makes it lovely, sad, and very critical at the same time. And the fact that it is Miss Abbott, the woman who is expected to fall in line with expectations of her more qualified peers, who is - without having to shout it from the rooftops - the wiser and more worldly of the characters, just puts Forster way ahead of his time. Those aspects I really love about the book, but they just do not come to the fore in Where Angels Fear to Tread

 

Instead, we get to meet a lot of fools.

For the barrier of language is sometimes a blessed barrier, which only lets pass what is good. Or—to put the thing less cynically—we may be better in new clean words, which have never been tainted by our pettiness or vice.

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text 2018-05-15 21:26
Reading progress update: I've read 82%.
Where Angels Fear To Tread - E.M. Forster

Do you want the child to stop with his father, who loves him and will bring him up badly, or do you want him to come to Sawston, where no one loves him, but where he will be brought up well? There is the question put dispassionately enough even for you. Settle it. Settle which side you’ll fight on. But don’t go talking about an ‘honourable failure’, which means simply not thinking and not acting at all.

 

Philip is an ass.

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text 2018-05-14 19:26
Reading progress update: I've read 53%.
Where Angels Fear To Tread - E.M. Forster

Philip made her look out of the window because it was Virgil’s birthplace, and a smut flew in her eye, and Harriet with a smut in her eye was notorious. At Bologna they stopped twenty-four hours to rest. It was a festa, and children blew bladder whistles night and day. “What a religion!” said Harriet. The hotel smelt, two puppies were asleep on her bed, and her bedroom window looked into a belfry, which saluted her slumbering form every quarter of an hour. Philip left his walking-stick, his socks and the Baedeker at Bologna; she only left her sponge-bag. Next day they crossed the Apennines with a train-sick child and a hot lady who told them that never, never before had she sweated so profusely. “Foreigners are a filthy nation,” said Harriet. “I don’t care if there are tunnels; open the window.” He obeyed, and she got another smut in her eye.

I can totally see how this is an early novel: it lacks the focus on pressing the point or plot ahead that the later novels have. Instead, we have a ton of characters thrown on the pages, trying to figure out who they are, while we try to figure out why they are there. 

 

However, I can see small hints of Forster's bite, too. 

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review 2016-06-07 15:02
Very good tale by EM Forster
Where Angels Fear to Tread - E.M. Forster

One of EM Forster's shorter novels and it's entertaining enough. This well-written novel is about a young widow living with her husband's family in middle-class England who takes herself off to Italy where she meets and weds a young Italian. She dies shortly after during childbirth. The novel deals mainly with the aftermath of this how English morals and society clash with Italian common sense with dramatic consequences for all the protagonists.

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text 2014-08-07 18:40
July Round Up
Where Angels Fear to Tread - E.M. Forster
Blood and Chocolate - Annette Curtis Klause
Outlander - Diana Gabaldon
Arsenic and Old Lace - Acting Edition - Joseph Kesselring
The Cornell Woolrich Omnibus: Rear Window and Other Stories / I Married a Dead Man / Waltz into Darkness - Cornell Woolrich
The Philadelphia Story - Philip Barry
Chocolat - Joanne Harris
The Art of War - Thomas Cleary,Sun Tzu
Warm Bodies - Isaac Marion
To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee

This post is a bit late because I went to the beach with my family last week, but July was been an exceptionally good reading month for me! I think it's partially because the wedding's over and I'm not currently working, so I've really been able to sit down and read a lot, but also I've just gotten lucky with my reading choices - so many of the books I read this month have been amazing! 

 

I read 11 books this month (not shown is The Perks of Being a Wallflower, which I re-read with my book club). Well, 2 were plays and 1 was a short story, but anyway - 10 pieces of literature. I didn't finish one of the books on my list, Anna Karenina, but I'm re-reading that in preparation for my book club's read of that (they're actually currently reading it, but it's on our longer reads list so I'm reading it a bit ahead of them as I prep their reading guide questionnaires), so I wasn't too upset about not finishing that. I also missed reading The Maze Runner, which disappointed me, but I've requested it from my library so I'll read it eventually. I did read Blood and Chocolate and To Kill a Mockingbird, which were not on my list, so that's a good thing! 

 

Favorite Book in July: 
It is SO hard for me to pick an absolute favorite this month, because I read SO many great books! Out of the books that I haven't read before, Outlander by Diana Gabaldon is definitely my favorite, but To Kill a Mockingbird is also fantastic. 

 

Least Favorite Book in July:

Again, these books are all so good that it's hard for me to really say which was my least favorite... but I'm going to go with Where Angels Fear to Tread, because I'd actually completely forgotten about it until I went back through my records to write this post. Whoops, haha. If it's forgettable, then it's definitely not as good as the others! 

 

Have you read any of the books that I read last month? What were your favorite books for July?

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