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The Darkest Child - Delores Phillips
The Darkest Child
by: (author)
4.33 45
“Evil’s regenerative powers and one girl’s fierce resistance. . . . A book that deserves a wide audience.”—The Cleveland Plain Dealer “Filled with grand plot events and clearly identifiable villains and victims . . . lush with detail and captivating with its story of racial tension and family... show more
“Evil’s regenerative powers and one girl’s fierce resistance. . . . A book that deserves a wide audience.”—The Cleveland Plain Dealer “Filled with grand plot events and clearly identifiable villains and victims . . . lush with detail and captivating with its story of racial tension and family violence.”—The Washington Post Book World “[An] exceptional debut novel. . . . [Has] a depth and dimension not often characteristic of a first novel.”—Library Journal (starred) “Phillips writes with a no-nonsense elegance. . . . As a vision of African-American life, The Darkest Child is one of the harshest novels to arrive in many years. . . . [Phillips] buttresses those harsh episodes with a depth of characterization worthy of Chekhov, pitch-perfect dialogue, and a profound knowledge of the segregated South in the ’50s.”—The New Leader Rozelle Quinn is so fair-skinned that she can pass for white. Her ten children are mostly light, too. They constitute the only world she rules and controls. Her power over them is all she has in an otherwise cruel and uncaring universe. Rozelle favors her light-skinned kids, but Tangy Mae, 13, her darkest-complected child, is the brightest. She desperately wants to continue with her education. Her mother, however, has other plans. Rozelle wants her daughter to work cleaning houses for whites, like she does, and accompany her to the “Farmhouse,” where Rozelle earns extra money bedding men. Tangy Mae, she’s decided, is of age. This is the story from an era when life’s possibilities for an African-American were unimaginably different. Delores Phillips was born in Bartow County, Georgia in 1950, the second of four children. She graduated from Cleveland State University with a bachelor of arts in English and works as a nurse at a state psychiatric hospital. Her work has appeared in Jean’s Journal, Black Times, and The Crisis. She has lived in Cleveland, Ohio since 1964.
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Format: paperback
ISBN: 9781569473788 (1569473781)
ASIN: 1569473781
Publisher: Soho Press
Pages no: 462
Edition language: English
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Community Reviews
Books Over TV
Books Over TV rated it
5.0 Darkest Child: A Novel
The Darkest Child by Delores Phillips is soul wrenching horrendous. One would never believe that a Mother could so deeply harm a child, let alone "10" of them, emotionally, spiritually, physically and mentally. Rozelle is a woman who is Pure Evil! She cares for no one, not even herself. Unfortunatel...
katewelsh
katewelsh rated it
4.0 Darkest Child: A Novel
The book is good-it's a fact. This book isn't easy- it's a fact too. The story, hmm, can I write interesting about something awful? The story is bitter, painful, even physicality and unbelievable. Some may say that it is just another book about dysfunctional family, or another way of presenting chil...
Barks At The Moon
Barks At The Moon rated it
4.0
This is the story of dirt poor 13 year old Tansy Mae, one of ten children born to her unstable and at times very abusive mother. Tansy's mother is black but easily passes for white and makes her living cleaning houses for rich folks and pleasing the men of the house (but she keeps this from the youn...
Books and the Readers who read them
Books and the Readers who read them rated it
4.0 Darkest Child: A Novel
This is an incredibly compelling powerful book about a young girl with dark skin and a sharp mind. I didn't read ANYTHING on this book before I bought it. I did not want any preconceived notions about it. I must say it was a captivating read and I wish filmmakers did not butcher novels because I wou...
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