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The Working Poor: Invisible in America - David K. Shipler
The Working Poor: Invisible in America
by: (author)
4.22 45
“Nobody who works hard should be poor in America,” writes Pulitzer Prize winner David Shipler. Clear-headed, rigorous, and compassionate, he journeys deeply into the lives of individual store clerks and factory workers, farm laborers and sweat-shop seamstresses, illegal immigrants in menial jobs... show more
“Nobody who works hard should be poor in America,” writes Pulitzer Prize winner David Shipler. Clear-headed, rigorous, and compassionate, he journeys deeply into the lives of individual store clerks and factory workers, farm laborers and sweat-shop seamstresses, illegal immigrants in menial jobs and Americans saddled with immense student loans and paltry wages. They are known as the working poor.They perform labor essential to America’s comfort. They are white and black, Latino and Asian--men and women in small towns and city slums trapped near the poverty line, where the margins are so tight that even minor setbacks can cause devastating chain reactions. Shipler shows how liberals and conservatives are both partly right–that practically every life story contains failure by both the society and the individual. Braced by hard fact and personal testimony, he unravels the forces that confine people in the quagmire of low wages. And unlike most works on poverty, this book also offers compelling portraits of employers struggling against razor-thin profits and competition from abroad. With pointed recommendations for change that challenge Republicans and Democrats alike, The Working Poor stands to make a difference.
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Format: paperback
ISBN: 9780375708213 (0375708219)
ASIN: 375708219
Publisher: Vintage
Pages no: 352
Edition language: English
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Community Reviews
Bryan Thomas Schmidt
Bryan Thomas Schmidt rated it
5.0 The Working Poor: Invisible in America
A powerful examination of the poverty right under our noses here in the US, people who work and live near us but are struggling to get by and how the system contributes to their failure and keeps them slaves of poverty. An important, well written book.
Kaethe
Kaethe rated it
Five years ago it was pretty horrible to be poor in the US. It is even worse now, when we're at the greatest disparity between rich and poor since before the Great Depression. I just want to shake people's lapels and yell "It's always the economy, stupid." I'm afraid all I'd get are blank stares.
willemite
willemite rated it
This is a depressing account of many individuals who are afflicted with poverty and are, with exceptions, unable to escape. The book provides considerable ammunition for the view that the poor are kept there by an uncaring and hostile society. From the tales and analyses emerge nuggets of potential ...
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