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text 2017-03-30 00:10
Reading progress update: I've read 89%.
Locked - Brooke Blaine,Ella Frank

“The first thing you asked me is what I’m doing here with you.” Entwining our fingers, Ace took a deep inhale, and when he let it out, it was as if it were the first full breath he’d taken since he’d last touched me. Then he whispered, “I’m living.”

I could feel tears welling in my eyes, and when I shut them to stave them off, I heard him say, “Look at me, Dylan.”

And when I blinked and refocused on him, I was shocked to see his own eyes were glistening. “The second was why. Why am I with you…” As Ace’s voice trailed off, he brought his other hand to my cheek and asked, “Where else would I be?”

 

 

❤❤❤

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review 2017-03-29 21:42
Stone Spring / Stephen Baxter
Stone Spring - Stephen Baxter

Ten thousand years ago, a vast and fertile plain exists linking the British Isles to Europe. Home to a tribe of simple hunter-gatherers, Northland teems with nature's bounty, but is also subject to its whims.

Fourteen-year-old Ana calls Northland home, but her world is changing. The air is warming, the ice is melting, and the seas are rising. Then Ana meets a traveler from a far-distant city called Jericho-a city that is protected by a wall. And she starts to imagine the impossible...

 

I read this book for the frivolous reason that it has “Spring” in the title and its springtime as I write this review. Plus, it had been on my TBR list for some time and I decided that it was time that I moved it.

It’s a solid story—set in Mesolithic Europe, as the climate and the land masses change with the melting of the ice sheets. Baxter has obviously done his research on the archaeology of the region, including the parts that are completely underwater now. And he has thrown in his own imaginative touches, creating believable cultures for these prehistoric tribes and inventing one that is entirely fictional, the “Leafy Boys.”

There is conflict—when you’ve got a hammer, every problem looks like a nail and when you’ve got a stone-tipped spear, well everything looks like it needs to be poked with that spear. The primary relationships are those of tribe, parent, child, etc. and not so much romantic. There is very, very little sex described, it is mostly implied or spoken about crudely by loud-mouthed men. In some ways, it is Jean Auel’s Earth’s Children series without the sex and much less emotional angst.

Obvious messages include: slavery is bad, global warming will raise water levels so deal with it, and that it’s difficult to deal with people who hold extremely different worldviews from yourself. I was somewhat unsure of how I felt about the character of Ana, who runs other tribe’s people’s lives ruthlessly and has a baby only to solidify her chosen power structure. I know people like this exist, but her choice of power over genuine emotion bothered me.

I guess what I didn’t entirely care for was the grafting of 21st century values and motivations onto Stone Age people. It didn’t always ring true for me, but it was still a pretty good book.

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text 2017-03-29 18:58
Reading progress update: I've read 76%.
Locked - Brooke Blaine,Ella Frank

Brenda Brenda Brenda 

 

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text 2017-03-28 18:01
Reading progress update: I've read 46%.
Locked - Brooke Blaine,Ella Frank

“You brought Ace fucking Locke to our house without telling me?”

I couldn’t help the yes I did smile that was now spread across my entire face. Then I caught Ace move, and my eyes flicked up to see him step forward to stop just in front of Derek, who’d now turned back to face him. Ace held his hand out, and when Derek raised his to take it like a robot, Ace flashed his thirty-million-dollar smile and shook it.

“You would be right. I am Ace Locke. And you must be Derek, the guy I have to thank for not being able to get it up.”

Oh no he didn’t. 

 

 

Oh yes he did. 

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review 2017-03-28 15:48
Transcendently bizarre!
Doom Patrol (2016-) #5 - Gerard Way,Tamra Bonvillain,Nick Derington

This has a lot to it, it's just wrapped up in the oddest trappings possible.  I'm especially having a hard time grasping what's happening to Trainor, and I suspect the fact that I haven't read much Doom Patrol is a hindrance, as well.   Still, what little I've read off the internet about the earlier series seems to indicate this, much like Shade the Changing Girl, is a departure from the original: it's meant to be a new take that stays true to the roots and general feel of the original series. 

 

Don't read out of order, though, or else you will be super confused.   Some series, I feel, could summarize and don't in order to get you read in order.   I feel it's penalizing to those who jump on board later - and quite frankly a bad move as something coherent/summarizations would allow a broader readership if someone did manage to miss issue one.   It feels like a money grab to me.   Not summarizing Doom Patrol, or needing to read in order, doesn't feel like that in this one.   (And, yes, I have the same complaint for Suicide Squad which I like as much; they could easily summarize and don't.   Doom Patrol doesn't feel like a mad grab for money, while Suicide Squad feels more so like that.   Suicide Squad penalizes those who don't buy regularly, because they could easily summarize and don't; Doom Patrol doesn't as it couldn't easily summarize.   It's too bizarre to really grasp the whole thing in one page.   The story itself makes that impossible, so I don't feel like needing to read this in order is just for the money: there's simply no other way to tell this story, and to explain what's happened before.)

 

Love, love, love!

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