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Search tags: 2017-library-love-challenge
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review 2017-03-22 21:08
Review: The Girls Who Went Away by Ann Fessler
The Girls Who Went Away: The Hidden History of Women Who Surrendered Children for Adoption in the Decades Before Roe v. Wade - Ann Fessler

This was a fast read, but heartbreaking look at the America's "golden era" (post-WWII to 1973). The author is an artist and art professor who works mainly in video and photography; this book is more or less a literary version of her gallery work. It is also deeply personal, as the author was one of the babies surrendered and adopted during this era. The book opens and closes with the author's journey to finding her birth mother.

 

This book is HIGHLY repetitive, to the point that the repetition becomes almost satirical. Every woman profiled is/was white, middle class or upper middle class, Christian, from a two-parent heteronormative family, and never had sex education (either by parents or an organization). Their stories started to blend into one another. The author does broach the subjects of class, race, and religion in the last two chapters devoted to the women and explains why the women profiled were all from the same background. Those chapters were the most interesting from a intersectional feminist historian angle. There were inclusions of women who were date-raped, but at the time did not have the information (or even the words) to understand they had been raped until much later in life. For most of the women, they went in search of their children or made it possible to be found by their children; the author does go into the methods and organizations that are working with both groups to reunite families.

 

These are heartbreaking stories, even if they run together in the readers' heads. Families were particularly cruel to the pregnant teen, but the staff at hospitals and homes for unwed mothers were even more so. They sheer amount of lies, money, and judgment the adoption industry created in the post-WW II years was astounding. However, this book is not anti-adoption, a claim that is brought up in many reviews. They adoption process/legal rights is vastly different today than it was during this time period (much of that is credited to the work of the unwed mothers and surrendered children of this time, who banded together in the late 1970s and early 1980s).

 

I would recommend this book for anyone who is interested in maternal issues or women's history.

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review 2017-03-22 20:37
Review: Battlefield Angels by Scott McGaugh
Battlefield Angels: Saving Lives Under Enemy Fire From Valley Forge to Afghanistan (General Military) - Scott McGaugh

Scott McGaugh wrote a decent book about the military medicine corps and how they changed the battlefield throughout America's history. McGaugh is not a historian, which is clear from his choices to profile and how he structured the book; he is a communications director for a museum and so his writing reflects a public relations-type of delivering information. 

 

The Revolutionary War, the Civil War, and World War I each get one chapter that was very much an overview of the wars and where military medicine stood. Each of these chapters felt very similar, as the military was never really mindful of the medics, equipment, or processes that were advancing in the civilian world...until fighting broke out and men were dying. There was a lot of improvisation and development came from the Army branch. The highlight of this section was the mobile ambulance trains; I got to see and explore one on my trip to York's National Railway Museum.

 

This was followed by six chapters on World War II, five of which were devoted to the Marines fighting in the Pacific Ocean. And this is where the book fails a little for me - the one chapter on Europe dealt with the Army's advancement in medicine, but it was a total love fest between the author and the Marines. There was one chapter devoted to medical corpsmen who were POWs under the Japanese which was the most interesting chapter World War II section had.

 

And the Marine love-in continued in the one chapter on the Korean Conflict, even though the highlight of this era's medical advancement was the concept and execution of M.A.S.H. - Mobile Army Surgical Hospital (emphasis mine). Vietnam got two chapters, both dealing with Marines yet again. Ditto for the one chapter on Iraq (combination of Desert Shield/Desert Storm and Operation Iraqi Freedom, which was another fail for me as each operation was very different other than location), although for the first time a female medic was profiled. The lone POC profiled came in the chapter on Afghanistan, but you also get another group of Marines as well.  

 

Did I mention that my branch of service, the USAF, received 0, nada, nothing, Not. One. Damn. Word. about our medical corps? Yeah, this still annoys me a week after reading the book.

 

At the end of each chapter, there was a paragraph or two that just spewed stats about the number of troops involved in that battle/war, the number dying, the number injured - but no real analysis. It was interesting to read, but really only recommend this to military history buffs or medical history readers.

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review 2017-03-22 19:51
Review: Moneyball by Michael Lewis
Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game - Michael Lewis

This was a fun read for those baseball fans that are bewildered by how baseball teams build and manage said teams. My husband enjoys watching the Oakland A's, which is the subject of this book; but like other Lewis' works, this one is more about the culture and industry than just the this one team. I honestly wished other team managers/owners see the value in at least some of the ideas of Billy Beane and apply them to their own teams (*cough* NY Yankees *cough*  - yeah, maybe we could have avoided the problem that is A-Roid). I also like the fact that Lewis drags Bud Selig through the mud a little. Petty yes, but still fun reading. There was a lot of math involved and detailed descriptions of what stats actually mean, so I had a slower time reading this book than previous Lewis works.

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text 2017-03-17 19:00
Friday Reads!
Sleigh Bells in the Snow - Sarah Morgan
Cat Trick - Sofie Kelly
Rick Steves Travel as a Political Act - Rick Steves
The Idle Parent: Why Laid-Back Parents Raise Happier and Healthier Kids - Tom Hodgkinson

Happy St. Patrick's Day to the Irish and Irish diaspora around the world. I can claim Irish heritage via my great-grandmother and great-grandfather who came to the US from Cork.

 

My hubby came back from his TDY and surprised me with volumes 3 and 4 of Saga; he found them at the BX at the base he was TDY and remembered I had picked up one and two. He also bought a crap ton of Italian wine.

 

Tonight and tomorrow is my farewell trip to London with two friends, one of which is leaving to move back to the US. We are staying at a Harry Potter themed B+B, going to see the new Beauty and the Beast movie, do a Harry Potter themed walking tour on Saturday, followed by a little lunch and a little shopping.

 

Here is what I am reading this weekend and into next week:

1. Finish Sleigh Bells in the Snow by Sarah Morgan (print copy from personal shelves)

    I am only continuing with this book because it fits a Pop Sugar prompt. I am definitely not feeling Morgan's writing or the category-length story stretched out to a full book length plot line.

 

2. Cat Trick by Sofie Kelly (Kindle book via OverDrive)

     Another Pop Sugar prompt filler. A quick cozy mystery from an author I read before (another book in the series for Halloween bingo last autumn).

 

3. Travel as a Political Act by Rick Steves (Kindle book via OverDrive)

    Yet another Pop Sugar prompt filler, but I have had this one on my OverDrive wish list for a long time. I admit that if Steves or Samantha Brown had not written this book, I probably wouldn't have given it a second look; but because I like Steves' work on TV, I am looking forward to how he might incorporate politics (international and/or domestic) into the arena of travel.

 

4. The Idle Parent by Tom Hodgkinson (Kindle book via OverDrive)

    One last Pop Sugar prompt filler. My Kindle is going to get quite the work out this week.

 

Also, I have at least three reviews to write, but just not feeling the writing vibes as much as the reading vibes.

 

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text 2017-03-17 02:16
Reading progress update: I've listened 290 out of 1770 minutes.
On the Oceans of Eternity - S.M. Stirling

I think this 29 1/2 hour audiobook will keep me busy for a while.  Though I got a good start during today's long car ride today for a work meeting several states away (7+ hours total).

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