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Search tags: 2017-library-love-challenge
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review 2017-05-21 01:52
Ponyboy, Ponyboy, Where have you been?
The Outsiders - S.E. Hinton

After listening to The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton, I can see why this book has been a staple of the High School curriculum.  Ponyboy Curtis is a young adult struggling to find his place with his brothers and in the larger society.  While some of the language is a bit dated (referring to a tobacco cigarette as a "weed?"), or perhaps because of those language choices, The Outsiders does a wonderful job depicting nostagic Americana.  I enjoyed it, though found some of the digressions into description a distraction.

 

 

I read The Outsiders for Booklikes-opoly Square Main Street 11: Read a book that takes place between 1945 and 1965 or that was written by an author who was born before 1955.  It feels the events of The Outsiders could be happening anytime within 5 years of 1960 or so. (The book itself never states a year or any identifying information such as a political figure, but the Wikipedia article says that the book is set in 1965).  Regardless, S.E. Hinton was born before 1955.

 

192 pages

Bank Balance $38

Not rolling again until I finish the rest of my Dewey's Bonus Roll selections (unless I hear otherwise)

 

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review 2017-05-15 23:31
Booklikes-opoly Update - Rolls 4 & 5

 

 

DATE: May 15th 

Bank Account: $36

 

I made rolls 5-7 on April 30th as part of the Dewey's Readathon bonanza. I was too busy at work to read much in the last 2 weeks, but a quick jaunt to TX for a cousin's Bar Mitzvah meant time to read on the plane.  

 

Roll #: 4

Lands on: Cars Land 18 - Read a book published in 2006, 2011, 2013 or 2014 or that has a car on the cover

 

It's been a while since I've read any Chik Lit like the Elm Creek Quilters by Jennifer Chiaverini and I've been wanted to change up genres recently. I selected Fast Women in part due to Murder By Death's recent review and because the cover matched the square

 

  

 

Fast Women wasn't bad, but it was not entirely to my taste. I don't feel compelled to seek out other books by Jennifer Crusie. 

 

 

 

Roll #: 5 

 

Lands on: New Orleans 21 - Read a book set on an island or that has water on the cover

 

Salt to the Sea - Ruta Sepetys 

 

 

As described in my previous post, I read Salt to the Sea by Ruta Sepetys.  I was compelled by the story, but the tragic topic doesn't lead to swoonlike responses. 

 

I have selections picked out for the other 2 Dewey's Bonus Rolls, including one that I'm very  much looking forward to, so I won't be rolling again quite yet.

 

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review 2017-05-15 00:33
Salt to the Sea

 

 

I selected Salt to the Sea for the first of my Dewey’s Readathon Bonus rolls New Orleans 21   Salt to the Sea has a picture of the sea on the cover.

 

 Salt to the Sea - Ruta Sepetys 

 

 

I’ve made no secret of being Jewish, and I’m of an age that many of my Hebrew School teacher were Survivors of Hitler’s quest to annihilate the Jews.  So I was steeped in the Shoah narrative from an early age.

 

As she did for Between Shades of Grey, Ruta Sepetys has mined her family history to remind us of how many other tragedies occurred during the Second World War. The chaotic events that culminate in the sinking of the Wilhelm Gustloff are told by the closely interwoven stories of 4 young adults

 

  • Joana – a Lithuanian refugee with some medical training
  • Friedrich – a German civilian boy struggling to hide his identity and purpose
  • Emelia – a pregnant Polish girl
  • Albert – an odious German soldier

 

The extremely short chapters should be choppy, but instead the weave together into a dischordant whole.  I don’t know whether I enjoyed Salt to the Sea, but I was compelled, almost driven to keep reading until the tragic conclusion.  

 

 

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review 2017-05-06 02:50
As They Went Marching, Marching
March (Book One) - Andrew Aydin,Nate Powell,John Robert Lewis
March: Book Two - Andrew Aydin,Nate Powell,John Robert Lewis
March: Book Three - Andrew Aydin,Nate Powell,John Lewis Gaddis

 On the 100th day of Mr. Trump’s Presidency, I finished March Book 3

 

Starting with his childhood in segregated Alabama and ending with the 1963 March on Washington, the three volume graphic novel biography March chronicles the early life of Representative John Lewis of Georgia and the role he played in the Civil Rights Movement as a leader of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC).  Nate Powell's strong black and white line drawings bring the determination, blood, and success of the Civil Rights movement to life.

 

I found these books a timely, painful read.  And the parts that had me heartbroken were not the spare depictions of the atrocities and hardships of the past, but the interwoven scenes of the 2009 Inauguration of President Barak Obama and my fears that the years of the Obama presidency are in hindsight going to be the best years of my life.  Reading March, it’s easy to see how far we’ve come, how much more there is to do, and also how much we could lose.  

 

 

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review 2017-04-29 01:35
Hidden Figures
Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race - Margot Lee Shetterly

Hidden Figures tells the story of the role that women “computers,” particularly female African-American “computers” played in the birth of the aeronautics industry.  This is an important story, a story that should have been better known a long time ago, especially considering how important race and gender were, and still are, in the US.

 

Biographies tell what people did; the best also tell who people were – their personalities and what they cared about.  1st time author, Ms. Shetterley generally does a good, though dry, job telling a story about Dorothy Vaughn, Mary Jackson, Katherine Johnson, and Christine Darden.  But at the end I didn’t feel like I know the women themselves. I am currently #65 on the hold list for the movie.  I wonder if I’ll have a better sense for who Dorothy, Mary, Katherine and Christine really are after watching some of the scenes I just read about come to life.

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