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Search tags: 2017-library-love-challenge
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review 2017-09-24 03:46
And Then There Were None
And Then There Were None - Agatha Christie

OF COURSE I've heard of the grand dame of mystery, Agatha Christie, but have I ever taken the time to read any of her books? Nope. Thank you Halloween Bingo for giving me an incentive to try something new.

 

And Then There Were None is in many ways the archetype of a closed-circle mystery.  And I'm glad it was my first introduction to the genre.  

 

 

I don't know whether other Agatha Christie titles will make it to the top of my enormous list of things I would love to have read, but it's definitely a possibility.

 

Read for  

 

 

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review 2017-09-23 02:15
The Thin Man - Halloween Bingo Classic Noir Buddy Read
The Thin Man - Dashiell Hammett

I have mixed feelings about The Thin Man.

 

On the positive side, I have now read another classic novel that I probably wouldn't of even considered picking up if not for Halloween Bingo. Noir is commonly associated with movies. I can appreciate the moments of wonderful dialog sprinkled throughout that likely translated well to the screen and saw how Hammett was thinking cinematically as he created the story.

 

On the negative side, I didn't care much about the characters and was confused too much of the time. I don't think the story has aged well, both the pacing and the roles of women don't work as well in 2017 as they might have in 1933.  

 

 

 

I'll be counting this towards the Classic Noir square, which while it hasn't been called yet, is strategically placed on my card.

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text 2017-09-22 18:54
Reading progress update: I've read 135 out of 208 pages.
The Thin Man - Dashiell Hammett

Not really liking The Thin Man, but somewhere about page 50 I realize that I would wonder how it turned out if I didn't finish.  Hoping to polish it off tonight and move on to something with a very different feel.

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text 2017-09-21 23:25
Reading progress update: I've read 67 out of 208 pages.
The Thin Man - Dashiell Hammett

Either my memory is failing me, or there are just too many characters being thrown at me too quickly.  The use of multiple names per person (Nora, Mrs. Charles) and the party scene in Chapter 7 didn't help.  So I actually made a list of characters/people mentioned

 

[ ] Nick Charles
[ ] Nora Charles 

[ ] Asta - the schnauzer 
[ ] Clyde Miller Wynant - inventor
[ ] Herbert Macaulay - Clyde's lawyer 
[ ] Dorothy (Dorry) Wynant - daughter 
[ ] Gilbert Wynant - brother 
[ ] Mimi (Wynant) Jorgensen 
[ ] Mr. Christian Jorgensen  
[ ] Julia Wolf
[ ] Harrison Quinn
[ ] Mrs. Alice Quinn 
[ ] Margot Innes
[ ] Albert Norman
[ ] Larry Crowley
[ ] Denis - girl with Crowley
[ ] The Edges
[ ] Shep Morelli - accused of murder 
[ ] Studsy Burke 
[ ] Policeman John Guild
[ ] Victor Rosewater 

We'll see if this helps.

 

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review 2017-09-21 17:07
Gulp
Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal - Mary Roach

Several years ago, I listened to the audiobook version of Gulp.  My reaction at the time was “Fascinating, with just the right amount of yuck factor.” 

 

I re-read Gulp during the early part of September since it was picked as the first Flat Book Society read.  The chatty, anecdotal style that worked so well for the first listen, didn’t hold up as well to a (print) re-read.  The level of detail for many of the chapters seemed more appropriate for a podcast or a newspaper article than for a book, and perhaps would have been better if encountered in episodic form with a break between sections.

 

My least favorite parts were the early chapters discussing the history of Fletcherism (obsessive chewing) and the 19th century experiments on Alexis St. Martin (he of the fistulated stomach), both stories I’d previously encountered.  The book picked up a bit once Ms. Roach started talking about the Oral Processing Lab at Wageningen University in the Netherlands and other recent research into the digestive process.   I particularly liked the chapter debunking the story of Jonah and the "whale." While many find the closing chapter regarding stool transplants repugnant, as someone with a delicate digestion, I found the idea of recolonizing the digestive system fascinating.

 

If you can appreciate potty humor and are interested in a semi-random series of tidbits loosely connected to digestion, then you might want to pick up Gulp for your next audiobook or bathroom read.   

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