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review 2019-01-05 07:51
After 1987's Predator, There Are The Comics...
Predator - The Essential Comics Vol.1 - Mark Verheiden,Chris Warner,Ron Randall

When Predator was released unexpectedly in 1987, it was one of the finest science fiction movie of its time since the release of Alien in 1979. In 1989, Dark Horse published Predator, the comic book series as an in-direct sequel to the movie before 1990 Predator 2. I have not read any of the comic versions until finally, I bought this... and I have some mix feelings towards it.

 

Predator: The Essential Comics Volume 1 features three reprinted mini-series that was published before over the years and one never before published adaptation of Predator 2 until now. In Predator: Concrete Jungle, the story takes place in New York city where during the hottest summer, the Predator is on the hunt again... except, he brings his compatriots. Detective Schaefer, brother of Major Alan "Dutch" Schaefer, together with Detective Rasche investigates the murders and the conspiracy of one certain general that was involved from the movie. As the Predators invade New York City, it take Schaefer and Rasche to save the day. In Predator: Cold War, the Predators are now in Siberia and once again, on the hunt. Schaefer and Rasche once again together with a beautiful Russian soldier will stop the Predators on their hunting game... only the Russian government and the American government and a certain general want the Predators technology. In Predator: Dark River, its summer all over again and this time, a crazed Predator from Schaefer's past returns and wreck havok in South America. Once again, Schaefer investigates and this time, he will put an end to it.

 

The comic book series is filled with a lot of one-liners and cheesy action. I can see that writer Mark Verheiden really love the movie and so, his style of writing is similar to how the 1980s are then but it doesn't get any better. Although I do feel the concept of the Predator universe is some what not understood, its not exactly the best of its own when it comes to reading. On art, Chris Warner and Ron Randalldid a good job capturing the presence of the characters. Its not really good and its not that terrible. Its just how it is when reading a Predator adaptation comic and felt as if a fan would have envision it. Overall for me, Predator: The Essential Comics Volume 1 would appeal to fans but not as an introductory story to those who are not familiar with.

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text 2018-09-14 02:51
At Least It Was Free
Emma: An Audible Original Drama - Morgan... Emma: An Audible Original Drama - Morgana Robinson,Joseph Millson,Aisling Loftus,Isabella Inchbald,Anna Lea - adaptation,Audible Studios,Jane Austen,Joanne Froggatt,Emma Thompson

Introducing Audible Originals. Each month, members may pick two out of six selected Audible Originals to download for free. The only one that had any appeal this month was Austen's Emma. Sadly it is an adapted dramatization, Austen Light for those whose only knowledge of Austen is from the television. After 8 minutes I had had more than enough, DNF'ed it and moved on.

 

It flips back and forth between dramatized dialogue and narration, with little connection between the narrator the subsequent dialogue, The dialogue sections are Foley-enhanced and the background noise is super annoying. Enough. You get the point. Don't say I didn't warn you.

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review 2018-09-12 00:00
Adaptation
Adaptation - Malinda Lo I liked this aaaa loooot.
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review 2018-06-13 02:01
What you gonna read?
Ghostbusters: Novel (Coronet Books) - Larry Milne

Recently I re-watched the 80's classic Ghostbusters and for the first time I wondered if there had ever been a novelization of the story. Spoiler alert: There is and it's pretty weird. Much like the Star Trek screen-to-book adaptations that I've read this was written directly after the film was released and includes additional scenes and background information not covered in the original film. For example, did you know that Winston's last name is Zeddemore? And if you had only read the book I doubt you'd find Dana very charming...in fact you might think she was abrasive. While it mostly stuck to the script's dialogue, the character descriptions fell short of the mark. (Egon is still the best though.) Bonus material like movie stills, cast and crew bios, and movie credits were tacked on making this feel less like a novelization and more like a marketing ploy. (If you haven't guessed yet I wasn't overly impressed with it.) What I like about both the book and movie are all of the obvious nods to New York like the Schwarzman branch downtown. It's such a cool way to feel connected to the story. XD I can't deny that it wasn't that great though so it's a 3/10 from me.

 

What's Up Next: The World According to Mister Rogers: Important Things to Remember by Fred Rogers

 

What I'm Currently Reading: Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison

Source: readingfortheheckofit.blogspot.com
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review 2018-06-08 23:24
Upstaged
[Death of a Hollow Man: A Chief Inspector Barnaby Mystery] (By: Caroline Graham) [published: March, 2006] - Caroline Graham

Once more I'm delving into Caroline Graham's world of detective fiction but this time it's with the second book in her Chief Inspector Barnaby series. Death of a Hollow Man takes place primarily in the Causton theater. It begins with the death of a prominent member of the local acting community committed during a performance of their newest production. Very dramatic, eh? [A/N: I have to restate my dislike of Sgt Troy who is misogynistic, homophobic, and generally vile. I understand he's used as a literary device to highlight how different he is from the main protagonist of the novel but I really wish he wasn't in the books at all. Something I do like is the relationship between Tom and his wife Joyce which is portrayed quite a bit differently from the TV series which I am more familiar with (and like better). The reader learns more background knowledge about how they met each other and fell in love (turns out Joyce is an excellent singer while Tom possesses admirable artistic skills). In fact, a lot of relationships are explored in this sequel and the majority of them are quite ugly beneath the surface. There's quite a lot of flippant talk regarding mental illness which I didn't particularly care for especially relating to Alzheimer's. I think the only really good thing I can say about this novel is that the mystery itself is fast paced and interesting so it kept me turning the pages. Graham knows how to write a gripping mystery but I don't think she's especially adept at character portrayals (or sensitivity). All in all, I think this will be my last foray into this literary series but I will continue to watch Midsomer Murders (especially after we visited the place where it's filmed). 5/10

 

What's Up Next: Ghostbusters by Larry Milne

 

What I'm Currently Reading: Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison

Source: readingfortheheckofit.blogspot.com
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