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review 2018-02-16 03:51
One of the Best Manga Science Fiction Ever Published.
Akira, Vol. 1 - Katsuhiro Otomo
Akira, Vol. 2 - Katsuhiro Otomo
Akira, Vol. 3 - Katsuhiro Otomo
Akira, Vol. 4 - Katsuhiro Otomo
Akira, Vol. 5 - Katsuhiro Otomo
Akira, Vol. 6 - Katsuhiro Otomo

If there is one thing when it comes to anime, people will always remember Akira. When it comes to manga, this is a one read people should invested on. I love Akira personally because of its sheer epic story of man versus Godhood and any thing that writes about power, this is the book people of all reader types should read.

 

30 years ago in 1992, an explosion in Japan cause the beginning of World War III. In 2028, Tokyo has become Neo-Tokyo, a place where society is on the rise of political distrust and Japan's top secret military army is trying to prevent one of its biggest secret to leak out to the world... until an accident on a highway towards where the origin of the explosion starts a chain of events that will lead to... Akira. Two friends (Kaneda & Tetsuo) will be fighting for their lives on friendship, love and the fate of Japan.

 

I love Akira ever since its anime was released in 1989. When I watched it, I was floored by its cell animation, its story and its science fiction action dystopian future. I never knew there was a manga series (but that was after I read Yukito Kishiro's Battle Angel Alita, and it still is one of my favorite mangas of all time, next to Akira) and it took me a while to finally waited long enough to get the compilation series in six volumes and read it at one go. This to me... is nothing more than one of the best sci-fi manga series ever written and drawn. There is so much to explore here and so much to love. Not many authors or creators these days are bold enough to write some thing this good and this is one of the best 1200 over pages I have ever read. Yes, there are some issues on the book that is overlook and not answered at all but to much of its own, it has answered a lot when it comes to its main story, not the back story. For me, if you want to pick up a manga title and its your first time ever - this is the manga series to invest on. 

 

p/s: Lately my reviews are getting shorter and shorter in writing. I would definitely explore back and write more if I had time.

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review 2018-02-11 22:38
A Love Song for the Miserable (one-shot manga) by Yukimura, translated by Sachiko Sato
A Love Song for the Miserable (Yaoi) - Yukimura

All Asada wants is to transfer to his company's Events Planning Division and hopefully start implementing some of his ideas to make their events better and more exciting. However, his request for a transfer is turned down. On the plus side, his horrible day at work leads to him meeting Nao, the son of the owner of a cake shop. Nao convinces Asada to be his taste tester, and the two men become friends.

Unfortunately, their relationship sours when Nao tells Asada that he plans to go to France to study to be a patissier. Asada reacts badly, and he and Nao don't meet or even speak to each other again until three years later, when Asada finally achieves his goal of joining the Events Planning Division and must get a new patissier to participate in the division's upcoming sweets fair. The patissier he's been assigned to negotiate with is Nao.

This was an impulse buy. It was on sale and at least one review of it stated that it was sweet and didn't have much in the way of sex scenes. I crossed my fingers and hoped that meant it was genuinely sweet and didn't include rape-y moments. The last time I took a similar chance I ended up with Tatsumi Kaiya's Hot Steamy Glasses, which didn't fit my definition of "sweet" and included a main character who considered resorting to rape because he was feeling sexually frustrated.

Thankfully, A Love Song for the Miserable was genuinely good. Yukimura paid a fair amount of attention to the nonsexual aspects of Nao and Asada's relationship. As far as rape-y aspects went, there was one instance when it looked like things were going faster than Asada could handle, but then Nao backed off.

The volume was primarily devoted to Asada gradually realizing the true nature of his feelings for Nao (for most of those three years he told himself he loved Nao like a brother) and then worrying that someone would notice how he felt. He was afraid that Nao would either react negatively if he knew or at the very least unambiguously reject him.

It wasn't until fairly late in the volume that Asada realized there was another element in play in his feelings for Nao: envy. From Asada's perspective, Nao had found his path in life and had then managed to move forward, whereas very little had changed in Asada's own life.

I really liked watching how things worked out between Asada and Nao. It's too bad the volume wasn't a bit longer - it would have been nice to see a little more of Asada and Nao after they became an official couple, and the whole issue of Asada's career concerns didn't seem to truly be resolved (okay, so he's happy with his job now, but why?). A couple shorts, one showing Asada and Nao a few years down the line and one with Nao's boss and her husband, would have also been lovely. That said, I really enjoyed this and could see myself rereading it in the future. Sadly, I don't think any of Yukimura's other works have officially been translated into English. I'd love to read more.

 

(Original review posted on A Library Girl's Familiar Diversions.)

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text 2018-02-08 03:31
Probably getting this in the near future
Erased, Vol. 1 - Kei Sanbe

I'm tempted to buy it so that I don't have to deal with waiting for each volume via ILL, but I need to remember that I have zero shelf space. So, ILL it is. Maybe after I get through all four volumes of Yukarism?

 

I'm currently watching Netflix's live action TV series based on this. There are moments when some of the acting is unconvincing, but mostly I'm enjoying it, even though I already knew going in who the murderer was. I'd have actually preferred my introduction to the series to be the anime, which I'd seen (spoiler-filled) clips of and thought looked gorgeous, but I'm not buying that at its current price of at least $15 per 25-minute episode.

 

The basic premise of this series: a twenty-something loner has the ability to go back in time and make situations that originally got someone killed work out for the better. It isn't something he really has control over, and he's usually only able to go back a few minutes into the past. Then his mother is murdered and he becomes a suspect. The one thing he wants most is to fix whatever it was that led to her being killed, so he's suddenly transported 15 years into the past, to a time in his childhood when several kids he knew were kidnapped and killed. Somehow those murders had something to do with his mother's death in the present. He thinks that if he can figure out how to stop them, then he can save his mom.

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review 2018-02-06 06:55
Yukarism (manga, vol. 1) by Chika Shiomi, translated by John Werry
Yukarism, Vol. 1 - Chika Shiomi

At his birth, Yukari was declared to have retained memories of his past life. In the series' present, seventeen-year-old Yukari is a prolific author of books set in the Edo period. He doesn't particularly like writing and he never does any research, but his memories of his past life compel him to write.

His lackluster attitude towards writing dismays Mahoro, a student at Yukari's school who happens to be a huge fan of his work. Yukari feels a connection to Mahoro, which he immediately realizes is due to the fact that they knew each other in the past - Yukari's past self was cut down by a sword and died in a fire, and it seems that Mahoro's past self died right beside him.

It'd merely be an interesting discovery, except that Yukari suddenly finds himself drawn into the past and deposited into the body of his former self, Yumurasaki, a popular oiran (according to the translator's notes, a class of courtesan). For some unknown reason, Yukari keeps getting pulled backward and forward in time, meeting people in his present who are reincarnations of people he knew when he was Yumurasaki.

I didn't realize until I started looking up more info about the meaning of "oiran" that I had probably mistaken this series for Sakuran, another series starring an oiran. Whoops. Well, I can try to hunt that series down later.

Yukarism wasn't exactly bad, but it left me feeling very underwhelmed. Yukari's reaction to being transported into the body of his past self seemed extremely muted considering that 1) his past self was female, 2) sex was very likely to come up at some point, and 3) it was possible he could end up experiencing his past self's death. Oh, and he had no idea whether his actions in the past might have some effect on the future - although he inhabited the body of his past self, his mind was very much that of his current self.

In this first volume, Yukari met three people he knew in his past life: Mahoro, who was once Kazuma, Yumurasaki's (male) bodyguard; Emi, who was once Hitoha, Yumurasaki's apprentice; and a young man who once Takamura, a good-looking but menacing client of Yumurasaki's. Everyone seems to be at least a little affected by their past lives, even though most of them have no memories of their past selves. From the look of things, the series is going to be focused on the mystery of how Yumurasaki died, and whether history will end up repeating itself.

Since the series is only four volumes long, I plan on continuing on. I hope it improves, though. The premise is interesting enough, but the execution is a little weak. At least the artwork is decent.

Extras:

  • A couple pages of translator's notes.
  • Author sidebars. Writing/illustrating a historical manga was very much outside the author's comfort zone.

 

(Original review posted on A Library Girl's Familiar Diversions.)

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review SPOILER ALERT! 2018-02-05 19:22
Book Review :Food wars vol 2
Food Wars!, Vol. 2: Shokugeki no Soma - Yuki MORISAKI,Shun Saeki,Yuuto Tsukuda

Jan 28- Feb 5

Leaving home for the first time in his young life, Soma moves into the school’s Polaris Dormitory—a place run by an old crone and filled with crazy and eccentric students! Barely settled in, Soma quickly finds himself in one of Tohzuki’s legendary cooking duels—a shokugeki! Who will his very first opponent be?

Review : Soma is moving into his dorm but first has to pass with a cooking assignment with the land lady but once he does he meets all the other interesting characters living in the dorm isshiki invites him to join the others for a little party but how he invites soma is from the ceiling hes a weird dude . Soma and him kinda do a cook off but isshiki informs him its not offical the real ones have to be accepted and you have to give something to get something . Megumi and Soma check out the bowl club which is close to shutting down thanks to erina but soma wants to save it so he challenges Ikumi to an offical food war and he wins. Next they are all going to cooking camp which should be interesting.

 

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