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url 2017-05-30 19:45
68 New Releases in series today
Nighthawk (The NUMA Files) - Clive Cussler,Graham Brown
White Hot - Ilona Andrews
A Hiss Before Dying: A Mrs. Murphy Mystery - Rita Mae Brown
Tom Clancy's Op-Center: Dark Zone - George Galdorisi,Jeff Rovin
Dying Breath: A Heart-Stopping Novel of Paranormal Romantic Suspense (Krewe of Hunters) - Heather Graham
Fairy Tail 60 - Hiro Mashima
Beyond Reason (The Texas Trilogy) - Kat Martin
Spectacle - Rachel Vincent
Shadow Reaper (A Shadow Rider Novel) - Christine Feehan
New York, Actually: A Romance Novel (From Manhattan With Love) - Sarah Morgan

See https://www.fictfact.com/BookReleaseCalendar for full list and more thorough series details.

Source: www.fictfact.com/BookReleaseCalendar
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url 2017-05-20 01:13
The Baen Free Library — Lots of free ebooks
On Basilisk Station - David Weber
Cobra - Timothy Zahn
Fledgling - Sharon Lee,Steve Miller
There Will Be Dragons - John Ringo
Caliphate - Tom Kratman
Starliner - David Drake
Draw One in the Dark - Sarah A. Hoyt
The Honor of the Queen - David Weber

Not new (been around long time), but in case any SF/F fans overlooked, publisher Baen offers The Baen Free Library -- a digital library of the science fiction and fantasy publishing house Baen Books where e-books can be downloaded free in a number of formats.

 

Often it's the first book in an ongoing or a backlist series.

 

(They also have for sale eARCs of brand spanking new books well before available at retailers at http://www.baen.com/baenebooks#eARC  )

 

Links to the download the ones I featured (they offer many more):

 

Source: www.baen.com/categories/free-library.html
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url 2017-05-01 22:08
82 -- yes, EIGHTY-TWO -- new releases in book series tomorrow!
The Gathering Edge (Liaden Universe®) - Sharon Lee,Steve Miller
A Court of Wings and Ruin (A Court of Thorns and Roses) - Sarah J. Maas
Cold Reign - Faith Hunter
Pawn: A Chronicle of the Sibyl's War - Timothy Zahn
Darkship Revenge - Sarah A. Hoyt
The Dark Prophecy - Rick Riordan
Alien Education (Alien Novels) - Gini Koch
The Fallen - Eric Van Lustbader
Heat Storm (Nikki Heat) - Richard Castle
Super Narwhal and Jelly Jolt (A Narwhal and Jelly Book #2) - Ben Clanton

I included a few at top of this post but see the entire list at https://www.fictfact.com/BookReleaseCalendar by clicking on Tuesday, May 2.

 

Guess gearing up for spring vacations and summer reading?

Source: www.fictfact.com/BookReleaseCalendar
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url 2017-04-04 17:13
95 New books in series released today (per Fictfact)
Convergence - C.J. Cherryh
Saga TP VOL 07 (Mr) - Various Artists
Give Me a K-I-L-L: A Fear Street Novel - R.L. Stine
The Chosen: A Novel of the Black Dagger Brotherhood - J.R. Ward
My One True Highlander (No Ordinary Hero) - Suzanne Enoch
Night Sniper (BookShots) - James Patters... Night Sniper (BookShots) - James Patterson,Christopher Charles
Long Dark Dusk - J.P. Smythe
Rebels Rising - Shanna Swendson
Shadowcaster - Cinda Williams Chima
The Drowning King (A Fall of Egypt Novel) - Emily Holleman

See complete list at their new release calendar, https://www.fictfact.com/BookReleaseCalendar 

Source: www.fictfact.com/BookReleaseCalendar
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review 2017-01-18 14:41
Hope in the Dark
Hope in the Dark - Rebecca Solnit

I read this for the Social Justice Book Club I joined and that was featured in this Book Riot article: Level Up with the Social Justice Book Club. I enjoyed reading it but it didn't completely shatter my world and I didn't absolutely love it. It's a good book for when you feel like you need to be talked out of the feeling that everything is already lost and there is nothing that can be done about it.

There were some places in the books that genuinely inspired me but it did so by putting together in better language than I can articulate, or adequately reference, things that I knew already. The trajectory of hope only seems lost when we feel that we are in a major down-spiral of all things that we have fought for and that may be true for many, but I am personally surrounded by constant change in the non-political arena that are for the better and that are feminist in nature. They may not have direct social justice implications, but they make an impact on progress as well and being a part of that end of things made most of the points here not so much a surprise or new but directed at a different audience.

Honestly, I know how many feel about Trump and I'm not advocating for or against him here. His presence is not an automatic reversal of everything that every one has worked hard for. Some things will likely revert back but I highly doubt that those of use enjoying new freedoms are about to let them be taken away so quickly. His impending inauguration has even spawned some activism on a scale that would have seemed unnecessary with a Clinton presidency and I am interested in seeing what happens next.

As Solnit points out about the environmental lobby against the ranchers, sometimes the people we perceive as our opponents can be our biggest help in achieving the final goal. I'll be interested in seeing who the new bedmates end up being as everyone strives for what they believe in for the next four or eight years. The point is that hope should not be lost on account of a single election.

The new foreword and afterword were added, but not much of the meat seemed to have been changed as it mostly attacked Bush. I am also not here to go on about the pros or cons of the Bush administration. This is about the book, right?

Regardless, a Bush administration didn't destroy the country like many, including Solnit, seemed to think it would and an Obama administration didn't either, like many conservatives that I know thought it would. And again, our level of progress only seems bleak when we only go back one or two administrations. I remember growing up in the 80's and 90's in a country that was going to be swallowed by smog while dying of AIDS that were only in this country because of people still being decried as the dregs of society. I remember movements about rampant Styrofoam usage by corporations that have since abandoned the material and movements about saving the trees. People worked hard on getting awareness of what causes these things out to the masses and others worked hard on solutions or alternatives.

The trees aren't completely safe and the LGBT community is still fighting for rights, but these issues have come a long way with successive small victories. Homosexuals couldn't serve at all in the military when I was born, Don't Ask Don't Tell came along when I was in high school and I remember the day that it was completely repealed. By the way, women couldn't serve in combat roles at all back then either, and now we're integrating into every portion of the military with no combat exclusion whatsoever. There has been a lot of progress in the most unlikely of places.

We have a lot of reasons to maintain hope that not all progress will stagnate and not all progress will be driven backwards. It won't be easy, but the progress machine keeps turning and people keep learning and listening. Yeah, it would have been really symbolically cool to have a woman as president during the centennial of women attaining the vote in this country. There's still a possibility that instead it will be the year we first vote a woman into that office later that year.



Note: I do disagree with Solnit's stance on the story of the Fall being a "central" story to the Judeo-Christian cultural outlook. While it is a story that we tell as Christians (I don't want to speak for Jewish people, so I'll just rebut for Christians), it's far from central. It's part of the setup, like a first chapter or prologue. I agree with Solnit's assertion that many conservatives spend more time looking back than forward (I mean, "Make America Great Again" is a clear example), but not that it's a Christian idea of the past being more perfect than the future. To me, the story of the Fall actually illustrates the idea that Solnit makes further into the same chapter, that humans are unlikely to be happy with any form of Utopia. I feel that story is meant to show that we disobey. that we inherently do what we feel is best rather than what we are told is best, and we strive for more than we have and that it sets up a story where this continues to be the case until God sets up a new expectation, or covenant. I haven't read through the whole Bible and I am not a theologian, but I have been reading through it for a while now and am past that story. I'm about a third through, and have covered some other big highlights of Christianity from the Old Testament and just feel really strongly that "central" is not the appropriate term for where the story of the Fall sits no matter how you slice it. At best, I think it sits in parallel to the main story of Jesus and the redemption his death brings as the original thing that we need redemption from. At best. Feel free to disagree and we can talk about it in the comments.

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