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text 2019-01-13 10:41
Bout of Books Cycle 24 Daily Progress Report
Cheer Up Love: Adventures in depression with the Crab of Hate - Susan Calman
The Glass Universe: How the Ladies of the Harvard Observatory Took the Measure of the Stars - Dava Sobel
The Turning of Anne Merrick - Christine Blevins
Three Fearful Days: San Francisco Memoirs of the 1906 Earthquake & Fire - Malcolm E. Barker

Grab button for Bout of Books

 

Monday, January 7, 2019

Read: Nothing yet.

Currently Reading: Cheer Up, Love: Adventures in Depression With the Crab of Hate by Susan Calman

Challenge: 1) in six words: tea drinking, rain bringer, library lover (via Twitter); 2) IG photo of the book I'm currently reading

 

Tuesday, January 8, 2019

Read: Nothing yet.

Currently Reading: I read to the 75% mark in Cheer Up, Love

Challenge: 1) Dinner Party 2) no IG photo today.

 

Wednesday, January 9, 2019

Read: Still nothing.

Currently Reading: Cheer Up, Love. Didn't read much of this because I had book reviews to write.

Challenge: Nothing.

 

Thursday, January 10, 2019

Read: Nada.

Currently Reading: Cheer Up, Love. Very little read. More book reviews written.

Challenge: Nothing.

 

Friday, January 11, 2019

Read: Cheer Up, Love was completed right before we left for the lock-in.

Currently Reading: Nada.

Challenge: 1)IG photo of favorite cover color.

 

Saturday, January 12, 2019

Read: Nothing.

Currently Reading: Started The Glass Universe....and feeling meh about it so far. Started The Turning of Anne Merrick, which moved quicker than TGU.

Challenge: Nothing.

 

Sunday, January 13, 2019

Read: Nothing.

Currently Reading: Continuing with Saturday reads, plus started Three Fearful Days.

Challenge: Nothing.

 

Wrap Up

# of Pages Read: 

# of Books Read: 

# of Challenges Completed:

 

Thoughts

 

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text 2019-01-11 12:00
Friday Reads - January 11, 2019
Cheer Up Love: Adventures in depression with the Crab of Hate - Susan Calman
The Glass Universe: How the Ladies of the Harvard Observatory Took the Measure of the Stars - Dava Sobel

I get to spend tonight with my kids' Cub Scouts in a lock-in/winter camp out. So not a whole lot of reading will take place tonight or tomorrow morning. I also want to attend the base gym's Pilates-Yoga-Stretch Workshop on Sunday. So I am keeping it light this weekend with finishing Cheer Up, Love for BoB (the only book I read for this cycle). I also want to at least start The Glass Universe, as it is my substitute for another science book I had planned to read this month...and then another patron at the library borrowed it. 

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text 2018-12-29 22:56
2019 Reading Goals: Non-Fiction Science Reading List
The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks - Rebecca Skloot
The Genius of Birds - Jennifer Ackerman
Pale Rider: The Spanish Flu of 1918 and How It Changed the World - Laura Spinney
The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History - Elizabeth Kolbert
The Glass Universe: How the Ladies of the Harvard Observatory Took the Measure of the Stars - Dava Sobel
Code Girls: The True Story of the American Women Who Secretly Broke Codes in World War II (Young Readers Edition) - Liza Mundy
Broad Band: The Untold Story of the Women Who Made the Internet - Claire L. Evans
Rise of the Rocket Girls: The Women Who Propelled Us, from Missiles to the Moon to Mars - Nathalia Holt
Upstream: Selected Essays - Mary Oliver
Toms River: A Story of Science and Salvation - Dan Fagin

In addition to the twelve books listed in this post, I hope to read a few of the Flat Book Society picks.

 

1. The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot

2. The Genius of Birds by Jennifer Ackerman

3. Pale Rider: The Spanish Flu of 1918 and How It Changed the World by Laura Spinney

4. Silent Spring by Rachel Carson

5. The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History by Elizabeth Kolbert

6. Blood Feud by Kathleen Sharp

7. The Glass Universe by Dava Sobel

8. Code Girls by Liz Mundy

9. Rise of the Rocket Girls by Nathalia Holt

10. Broad Band by Claire L. Evans

11. Upstream: Selected Essays by Mary Oliver

12. Tom's River by Dan Fagin

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review 2018-12-04 12:55
The Glass Universe by Dava Sobel (audiobook)
The Glass Universe: How the Ladies of the Harvard Observatory Took the Measure of the Stars - Dava Sobel, Cassandra Campbell

This books gives a historical overview of the astronomy work at Harvard done and funded by women starting in the mid nineteenth century. It basically describes how some of the directors were forward-thinking enough to hire women first as computers and then (eventually) as outright astronomers and some of the steps taken to ensure that women were at least eligible for some of the awards that were eventually funded. Sadly, being eligible seems like a pretty low bar, but you have to start somewhere, right?

 

It was interesting albeit a bit dry in parts, and I'm not sure that audio was the best format for a book like this although the narrator, Cassandra Campbell, was quite good. It cuts off in the 1950s, although it references some of the discoveries made and awards won later on.

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review 2018-07-22 22:16
The Glass Universe by Dava Sobel
The Glass Universe: How the Ladies of the Harvard Observatory Took the Measure of the Stars - Dava Sobel

Dava Sobel's 'Glass Universe' has a fantastic premise: telling the story of the women who founded, funded, and worked in the Harvard Observatory from the late 19th century to well into the 20th.

There were marvelous strides made in astronomy during that time, and it is astonishing to think of how these women were able to parse out the mechanics and make-up of the stars from long examination of glass plate negatives.

The science was marvelous and astonishing. The women themselves, with very few exceptions, seemed to have escaped Sobel's notice. There was an enormous 'cast' of women for Sobel to profile, true, but she could have picked a few representative cases instead of picking 1, or at most 2, dramatic instances from the lives of dozens of scientists and patrons. This is unfortunate, as without a human touch to the narrative, the science made me glaze over.

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