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review 2017-06-24 16:22
Truly, Madly, Guilty - Liane Moriarty 
Truly, Madly, Guilty - Signed/Autographed Copy - Liane Moriarty

It's not a thriller.

 

Imagine that line as spoken by Arnold Schwarzenegger to his class in Kindergarten Cop. I start here because I saw a review saying what a disappointing thriller it was, and it would be disappointing if that was what Moriarty were shooting for. It's also not a romance, or a mystery, or a literary novel, although it does share some elements with those.

 

What it is is a book about regular middle class suburban couples who experience a trauma together, and how it affects their lives thereafter. It's not a big trauma, it's not newsworthy, but it affects them all, and their little kids, too. And because the author takes her work seriously, there is much more to it than just that, humor, and backstory, and a way through, and a future.

 

I love books like this about living in after some bad thing. Fairy tales are important because they teach us that the witch or the monster can be killed, these books (and I hope someone has a short, catchy name for the genre that isn't sexist, because I sure don't) these books demonstrate how to live through the bad things and still have a good life. I don't believe stories about people living through horrible events and being stoic and saintly and a good example. Pain doesn't make people stronger or better, it makes us angry, and short-tempered, and hell to get along with. And of course, we all have pain and most of it is garden-variety common and of no interest to others. And the older we get the more time we spend attending funerals, the more people we have to lose. These books remind us that we can still laugh at the wake, that there are many ways to comfort one another in our loss.

 

I'm on my way to a funeral soon 

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review 2017-06-24 02:45
[REVIEW] A Room of One's Own by Virginia Woolf
A Room of One's Own - Virginia Woolf

My first Virginia Woolf. It was very interesting. That first half though? Good grief. It was a rambling, meandering mess. I fell asleep three times trying to get through it.

The middle portion of the book is excellent. Some of her views sadly still apply today. How women are considered inferior, how they must be a mirror that reflects men's greatness back at them and if they don't fulfill this role, they are mercilessly attacked. It's all very true in this day and age.

She spoke from her perspective but as I read, I couldn't help but wonder about the women of color back then had the shit end of the stick.

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review 2017-06-21 01:44
The Hypnotist's Love Story - Liane Moriarty
The Hypnotist's Love Story - Liane Moriarty

This was my least favorite so far; it took me a while to really get hooked. And I still loved it. Erin who got me started on Moriarty has loaned me a Paula Hawkins, so I'm going to loan her a Carol Goodman. And walking out of my regular Tuesday meeting I got to talk books again with another coworker, who loved What Alice Forgot which I started as soon as I got home.

Like Saskia I had gotten out of the habit of talking to people, of having friends, of chatting. I appreciate having an example of how to get socially involved again.

Oh, hell, what I really love is the house on the beach.

Library copy

 

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review 2017-06-06 02:10
Where the Girls Are: Growing Up Female with the Mass Media - Susan J. Douglas
Where the Girls Are: Growing Up Female with the Mass Media - Susan J. Douglas

  

Picking it up to read in 2017, I quickly realize I have read this, lo, these many years ago. As I age it seems that everything reminds me of something similar in the past. I'm this case the thing it reminded me of was itself. It's still as good, but I don't feel like I need the refresher: I took the lessons very much to heart.

Library copy

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review 2017-05-26 16:58
Crazy Salad and Scribble Scribble: Some Things About Women and Notes on Media (Vintage) - Nora Ephron 
Crazy Salad and Scribble Scribble: Some Things About Women and Notes on Media (Vintage) - Nora Ephron

Having recently read Crazy Salad again, I didn't feel like I needed to give it another go. But I have never read Scribble Scribble. So, that was great.

Ephron started a s a journalist, and I think that training informs her essays. They are personal, they are reflective, but they are also about something real, not just aimless musing.

Quality writing, often amusing, and still vital and fresh.

Library copy

 

(edited for afterthought) In case you're wondering, apparently none of the material from Scribble Scribble made it into The Most of Nora Ephron, although some from Crazy Salad did. Just to clear things up for anyone else who might be considering a massive Ephron read.

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