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review 2018-08-16 18:11
Better Late Than Never - Kimberla Lawson Roby

 

 

Better Late Than Never is the 15th and final installment of the Rev. Curtis Black series.  

 

When Rev. Black receives an alarming telephone call that his sister, who he hasn’t had any contact with in decades is gravely ill, he rushes to be by her side.  As he spends as much time with her as possible old, disturbing memories of his childhood begin to surface.

 

Meanwhile, 12-year-old Curtina’s attitude toward her parents start to change.  She turns into a disrespectful and deceitful preteen full of resentment.

 

Now that Charlotte and Rev. Black are in a good place in their marriage and with their children, a sense of unfulfillment takes control which may cause her to resort to her old ways.

 

I found this installment to be less dramatic and over the top as the previous novels in the series.  I emotionally connected to some of the experiences in the story. At times when describing the relationships with the older children characters it was too “sugary sweet.”  

 

I must say, in Kimberla Lawson Roby’s style, there’s always a lesson about forgiveness, hope and redemption.  This series was fun and dramatically charged. I believe this series will be missed by many readers, however I sense  a series based on Curtina.

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review 2018-08-16 06:50
Fun running over tropes
Northanger Abbey - Jane Austen,Marilyn Butler,Claire Lamont

Why did I take this long to read this? From Austen's big six, this is the last I got to. I mean, I know what my reasoning was: satire and humour was not what I was looking for when I searched for an Austen volume. But I was wrong to, because this was a great romp.

 

(On that note, one day I have to write long and hard on how the prominence of Pride and Prejudice in pop-media puts an expectation on what Austen writes about that is a total disservice to her body of work)

 

If you put this and Persuasion together, it's impossible to ignore that the woman's common thread is not romance, but social critique, and tropes and expectations. In this one she takes Gothic literature ones, and more than run with them, runs them over. Anne Brontë kinda did that in a very understated way. There is nothing understated here, and I was laughing from the opening lines alone... Actually, the overall initial setting is quite similar to Brontë's Agnes Grey's opening, just, you know, absolutely savage. Much like the whole book.

 

The charming part comes from Catherine being a sincerely good-natured soul, and pretty sensible on the whole, so even where she hypes herself from much sensational reading (and hell, like nobody ever got jumpy in the night after reading or watching some horror), and builds some weird fantasies on it, she never quite finds herself carried away on over-dramatic feelings of angst, be it romantic or otherwise. Even when other characters ask about them on hilariously detailed, over the top descriptions.

 

I get now why it is the favourite Austen among many. I had lots of fun with it.

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review 2018-08-14 01:34
Review: The Christmas Gate 2
The Christmas Gate 2 - T. A. Cline

The Christmas Gate 2 opens up with Bob wanting to talk to his publisher. Once he does he makes deal that get him the lovely farmhouse where he could write his stories. Well things get a little more interesting once he moves in to his new farmhouse.

Once things get close to Christmas and plans are made for him and Patty. Patty get a knock at the door. Once does she find out her husband is alive and in the army hospital. What will happen with Patty and Bob?

Bob meets an woman and tell her his story. She get him advice and once she is gone for a bit he does do something inside the book she has. She doe not know until she opens it. He never mentions it either.

Bob make a decision to help Patty out by making it easy for her. Patty does not know this when he leaves after seeing her and getting the message from her friend Lucy. It seem that Patty has to do her own journey as to go on.

She finds a poem or letter addressed to her after Jim and everyone thinks Bob has pass away. Jim does his deal that the farmhouse is to go to Patty if something happened to Bob.

She reads something that Bob wrote at the end of the journal. “The Christmas Gate is not Fiction” and this get her attention and she goes to find the box and she does and she opens it. She think will get 7 visions and what will happen. The journey begins. You will not believe it but her candles and messages are different for her but her journey is bit different then Bobs. Will she find Bob? Will she be able to bring him home?

I really like the theme and plot of the candles. It really well written. The messages were different for each person on their own journey. You will not know until the end who the light form might be. It a fast read and enjoyable as well.

Source: nrcbooks.blogspot.com/2018/08/review-christmas-gate-2-by-ta-cline.html
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text 2018-08-12 23:43
Book Haul! Audible 2 for 1 Sale
The Elementals - Michael Rowe,Michael McDowell
Blackwater: The Complete Caskey Family Saga - Michael McDowell,John Langan
The Android's Dream - John Scalzi
'Salem's Lot - Ron McLarty,Stephen King

Usually I don't find anything I especially want at the Audible sales, but I think I got 4 good ones this time. And for you Halloween Bingoers, they have a number of horror and mystery/thriller books that fit the categories. 

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review 2018-08-10 10:51
Big character
The Princess Diarist - Carrie Fisher

I laughed, and I grimaced, and I ran a gamut of other emotions, from surprise, to disbelief, to pain and sympathy.

 

I stated to follow a print while listening because at first I did not always catch what Fisher was saying. There was much pausing, and after a while I kept doing it because there are minute differences here and there.

 

This is a very interesting lady. What astounded me the most is her capacity to write her 19-year-old self, with all the embarrassment and self-doubt. It's powerful enough to make you uncomfortable by proxy.

 

Back then I was always looking ahead to who I wanted to be versus who I didn’t realize I already was, and the wished-for me was most likely based on who other people seemed to be and the desire to have the same effect on others that they had had on me.

 

She writes an almost nude picture of herself, the good, the bad, the WTF (and there were many, many instances where I went WTF), the petty, the shy, the self-aware, the painfully young. There is this sense of "I'm at the last part of the slide, and I have little fucks left to give" mixed with the "still want to be liked".

 

There is a lot about her relationship with the character, a lot mixed feelings that in the end, amount to mostly positive.

 

“You were my first crush.” I heard it so much I started asking who their second one was. We know what a first crush is to a teenager, but what does it mean to a five-year-old?
“But I thought you were mine! That I had found you—I was the only one who knew how beautiful you were—because you weren’t beautiful in that usual way women in film are, right?”
He realizes that I might take what he’s saying wrong. He doesn’t mean it that way. I reassure him, touch his arm; why not give him an anecdote? “I know what you mean, it’s fine. Go on.”
He checks my face to see if I mean it. I do. He continues, “So my friend, when I tell him about my crush, he goes, ‘Oh yeah, she’s awesome! I have a total crush on her, too. Everyone does.’ I got upset. I coulda punched him.”
“Why?”
“Because you were mine and I wanted to be the one who loved you. Me, maybe even help you . . .” He got embarrassed. “Anyway—I wanted to tell you.” He shrugs, then adds, “Thanks for my childhood,” and walks off. Wow, what a thing to be given credit for, to be thanked for! Because he didn’t mean his whole childhood—he meant the good bits. The parts he escaped to.

 

It was a weird and nostalgic ride.

 

If you can find a common language that runs from five to eighty-five, you’ve got yourself something, and Star Wars fans have something.

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