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review 2017-04-23 21:30
March: Book Three by John Lewis
March: Book Three - Andrew Aydin,Nate Powell,John Lewis Gaddis

And with this, I've completed the trilogy. I am so happy I read this. It helped educate me on the finer details that helped bring about the Civil Rights Movement. In this volume, we follow John Lewis from the streets of Atlanta, Georgia to the entire continent of Africa and back to the streets of Selma, Alabama. This volume covers the events of Bloody Sunday, the 1965 Voters' Rights Act, and so much more.

 

John Lewis has a way of telling these important events in a conversational tone. And sometimes it sounds as if we're getting to sit in an academic setting and hearing his lecture of his time on the battleground. For that's what it was: a battleground. So many people mercilessly killed because they just wanted the same rights as white people. It's horrific and wrong. And although this is a very difficult read, it is also an important one.

 

The artwork is gritty. It's a lovely style, but it does not sugarcoat what went on during those times. And I am grateful that it doesn't. People need to see the blood, the violence, the deaths. They need to be reminded that these events happened and they could easily happen again if we are not careful. We need to be vigilant and help each other as much as we can. Because that's what it means to be human. I've learned so much about these events and I shall continue to educate myself and fighting for the rights of others.

 

Please read all three volumes of March. Especially if you don't know much about what America was like during the 60's. Lewis packs in a lot of information, yes, but it's vital to know who played a role in our history and how we got to where we are today. These are not easy reads, but I think the knowledge and experience you gain from reading these books are well worth it. I love these books and I will definitely be adding them to my personal library.

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review 2017-04-23 06:38
March: Book Two by John Lewis
March: Book Two - Andrew Aydin,Nate Powell,John Robert Lewis

This is a disturbing, harrowing, yet beautiful and important continuation to John Lewis's role in the Civil Rights Movement. This continues after his early life within the SNCC and how he became one of the "Big Six" as well as what happened during the March on Washington. 

 

Once again, I do not feel right reviewing this book. As I've said in my previous review, this is our history. This happened. The segregation, the violence, the murders... all of this was experienced by people. Real people. People whose lives were taken from them far too soon because of the blind hatred running rampant during those times... that could still rise up today if we are not careful.

 

John Lewis is an incredible man for working as hard as he did. Everyone who participated during the movement were all amazing! Every single one of them. From the leaders in the groups to the ones marching in the streets. Every single one of them were brave, incredible, amazing people who risked their lives... and sometimes lost them... in order for us to be here today. Thank you.

 

I will just reiterate: Please read these graphic novels. If you want to know history, if you want to understand what others went through and sacrificed so that we can have a better future, please read this. Educate yourselves as much as you possibly can. If you want to make a difference, know your history, learn from it, then we can move forward.

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review 2017-04-22 05:10
March: Book One by John Lewis
March (Book One) - Andrew Aydin,Nate Powell,John Robert Lewis

Lately, I've been trying to educate myself in areas of life where my knowledge is sorely lacking. A part of that lacking is how the Civil Rights Movement came about. Then, recently, I learned about Congressman John Lewis and his role in the Civil Rights Movement. When I heard about this graphic novel, I went to my library and placed orders for all three volumes. Now, after having read just the first volume, I can tell this is going to be one of the most important reads of my life.

 

How does one even begin to review a book like this? This is our history. This is extremely important information to know. Not only if you live in America, but for the world. What John Lewis and so many others did to help put an end (and there's still a lot more we have to do in order to fully put an end to racism and discrimination of any kind) to the injustices that were happening during that time period is astounding and is worth more than what my measly review can cover here.

 

So instead of reviewing this book like I would normally do, I will simply talk about the importance this graphic novel holds and how much I urge you to pick up this book. Or to pick up any book by John Lewis, really. 

 

This graphic novel covers the beginning of John Lewis's life where he grew up in a farm in Alabama and it covers his early teens to when he's a young adult at college. The story is harrowing, to say the least. This is a time where black people were beaten and killed for just looking at a white person... so you know this is going to be a hard read. But it is a necessary one. So please. Read this book. To educate yourself on our history. To learn from the brutal and cruel mistakes of our past. To have a better future.

 

This is not a book I think is an enjoyable read. How can you enjoy reading about people being stripped away of their rights and humanity? No. I will say this is an important read and, in a sense, a good one. Pick it up! The artwork is dark and matches the story perfectly, and the graphic novel might give some insight to how we got to where we are today and how we still have so much work left to do. I highly recommend this graphic novel.

 

I'm off to read the other two books in this trilogy. I have a feeling it's going to be just as painful and important to read.

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review 2017-04-12 17:03
Coffee at Luke's: An Unauthorized Gilmore Girls Gabfest - Jennifer Crusie 
Coffee at Luke's: An Unauthorized Gilmore Girls Gabfest - Jennifer Crusie

work library has it. Trying to get it downloaded onto a device I can read it on. So much aggravation.

I have it on my phone, now. W00t! If I can get it on my Kindle I will be a very happy person for about 5 minutes, until something else comes along to annoy me. Fingers crossed. I wanted the Fire specifically to be able to take advantage of the extensive work elibrary.

Now I've run into problems getting the sundry devices onto the Wifi network. Sigh. It's not a big problem, just a little niggling one that's going to drag this whole thing out for the entire day.

Not to name names, but the app for reading this on my phone was not convenient.

But the essays, they are intriguing. But also, collectively a little clueless. So many contrast New England culture against [place where the author is now] which is utterly unlike Star's Hollow, for good and ill. Seriously? I realize that Connecticut is the Land of WASPs, the place where Pilgrims get all the attention, but seriously, the lack of history re the entire rest of the nation was off-puttingly White-minded and just wrong. No one should ever again get a book chapter out of ignoring 1) millennia of First Nations, 2) five hundred years of Norse, and English, and Irish exploration and settlement, mostly for the cod 3) French settlement in Acadia 3) more than two hundred years of Spanish exploration and colonization. Seriously, Plymouth wasn't even the first permanent English colony in what is now the USA during the 17th century: there were already three in Virginia.

Generally I love a pop culture essay. I enjoy someone taking a tv show seriously, seeing what it says about society, family, religion, adulthood. Of course, there are problems: backstory is incomplete, sometimes contradictory, often open to interpretation, and that's when these essays get really good. Because there is no objective reality, everyone ends up writing not about the show, but about themselves. It's a Rorschach test. Humans are social animals, and it desire to examine the related between us is just as strong when we're talking about imaginary people. In real life a person rarely has to choose between two romantic prospects, but as a mental exercise it makes us consider what is most important: do we prefer similar backgrounds, or shared passions? Charm or loving actions? What do we need to be content?

So, here I am, nothing like Lorelei, except I do live in a charming old small town, and I like junk food and old movies and coffee, and books examining what this all means.

Library copy 

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review 2017-04-12 16:55
Paddle Your Own Canoe: One Man's Fundamentals for Delicious Living - Nick Offerman  
Paddle Your Own Canoe: One Man's Fundamentals for Delicious Living - Nick Offerman

Offerman is a lucky guy would had a good childhood, a good and meaningful college time, followed by the rest of his life, working hard at work and crafts he appreciates (which is mostly being silly, but also involves building canoes). He has a good work ethic and a seemingly kind heart, as well as a seriously advanced sense of humor. It's delightful to read a memoir by someone who understands that his life is very good and that he's lucky to have so many sources of pleasure.

On the downside, he has a very strong personality which won't appeal to all readers and which can become rather much of a muchness. Everyone's mileage is likely to vary a great deal.

Library copy

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