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review 2018-09-18 01:47
Mistress of Mellyn - Victoria Holt for Genre: Suspense
Mistress of Mellyn - Victoria Holt

Maybe it's nostalgia, maybe it was the disappointment of the last book, maybe the potato finally got digested, whatever it was I quite enjoyed this. Unlike the heroine I have a bit of familiarity with gothic conventions, so there weren't a lot of surprises, not that I expected any. But now I would like to do some kind of survey of the genre, noting popular locales (Cornwall and Scotland, of course, but where else), characteristics of the leads, relationship with the servents, what happened to the first wife, etc. No doubt the time of the writing has more influence on these attributes than the supposed setting year.

 

Fun times with old houses and dark doubts.

 

Library copy 

 

Would also work for Romantic Suspense, Terrifying Women, Gothic, Country House Mystery, and Amateur Sleuth.

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review 2018-09-15 01:59
What a gal!
Condoleezza Rice: A Memoir of My Extraordinary, Ordinary Family and Me - Condoleezza Rice

Condoleezza Rice: A Memoir of My Extraordinary, Ordinary Family and Me covers her childhood in segregated Birmingham, her close-knit family life, education, and rise through professional, educational, and political worlds. I went into this knowing almost nothing about Condoleezza beyond her serving in the White House under President Bush but by the end of this book I felt that I knew her as one knows a friend. I think what I found most surprising is that she still teaches classes (Managing Global Political Risk if you're curious) at Stanford University. This book runs chronologically as most autobiographies do but two of the biggest focuses are her relationship to her parents (she is an only child) and her professional life as an academic and political scientist. She is an accomplished, intelligent, and ultimately fearlessly ambitious woman. She has never married but seems genuinely happy with her single life (sounds familiar). She makes no bones about her many achievements which include but are not limited to being a proficient pianist and fluent Russian speaker. I also appreciated that she included photographs, a chronology of her career, and a glossary of historic events and people during her lifetime. I'd say that this book would be good for anyone looking to learn more about women in politics and/or what it was like for this particular woman who was raised during segregation in the tumultuous city of Birmingham...and still make it to the upper echelons of government. Good for history buffs and political junkies.  

 

What's Up Next: Recovery: Freedom From our Addictions by Russell Brand

 

What I'm Currently Reading: Star Trek Destiny #2: Mere Mortals by David Mack

 

Source: readingfortheheckofit.blogspot.com
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review 2018-09-10 05:58
Oh, My!
There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly - Simms Taback

Many children are already familiar with the "old lady" books. There are so many now! I am going to focus on one that delivers its own version of the original classic, There Was An Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly, by Lucille Colandro. The story uses rhyming text and hilarious illustrations to engage the reader. The main character, the old lady, swallows an entire menagerie of animals with each one being bigger than the last. Kids will enjoy the fun, colorful pictures and repetition. 

 

This book would be the perfect book for a lesson on rhyming words or sequencing. Have students cut and paste pictures from the story in sequential order or create a list of rhyming words following a class discussion of the rhyming words found in the story. 

 

Recommended for Ages: 5-8

Lexile Level: AD280L 

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review 2018-09-10 05:32
I Want To Be Friends With the BFG
The BFG - Roald Dahl,Quentin Blake

I LOVE Roald Dahl's, The BFG. Otherwise known as: the Big Friendly Giant. This was the first chapter book I truly enjoyed as I child, and I am currently reading my worn and tattered childhood copy aloud to my son every night. He always begs for me to read one more chapter, reminding me of the same love I had of the story growing up. The BFG centers around a young girl named Sofie, who is scooped up by the giant out of her bed one night. Terrified, because she believes the giant is going to eat her, she soon learns that the BFG is different from normal giants. He is friendly and caring and doesn't eat "human beans" at all. The BFG is full of humor and his silly, jumbled form of language will make any child laugh.

 

The BFG opens the doors for many lessons and activities including:

  • A lesson on character traits, both physical and inner
  • A discussion about the BFG's gobblefunk glossary, prompting students to create some made-up words of their own
  • Have students create a dream jar like the ones described in the book
  • Have students write about their dream(s)

 

Recommended for Ages: 8-12

Lexile Level: 720L

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review 2018-09-10 05:06
I'll Eat You Up!
Where The Wild Things Are - Maurice Sendak

Maurice Sendak's, Where the Wild Things Are is truly a timeless classic. I enjoyed it over and over as a child and my kids enjoy it just the same. The story follows a mischievous little boy named Max who gets sent to his room without any supper. Upon being sent to his room a forest begins to grow...and grow...and grow. Max's imagination takes him on a journey to a faraway place to where the wild things are. And although the wild things gnash their terrible teeth and roar their terrible roars, Max is unafraid and tames them with his magic, becoming king of the wild things. After his adventurous travels Max begins to feel hungry and tired and decides to return home, where his dinner is waiting for him, still warm. 

 

The beautifully detailed illustrations are just as intriguing as the story. Where the Wild Things Are is an enchanting read, and one that many children will be able to make connections with (whether it be imagining faraway lands and monsters, getting sent to your room, or acting like a wild thing). There are some wonderful activities to accompany this book and some of my favorites include:

 

  • STEM Challenge: Design your own wild thing, foil boat, or paper bag tree
  • Writing prompt: "I feel wild when..."
  • Act out the action words found in the book (roar, march, jump, gnash, etc.)

 

Lexile Level: AD740L

Recommended for Ages: 4-8

 

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