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review 2018-05-21 11:52
The Virgin Suicides - Jeffrey Eugenides,Nick Landrum

The Virgin Suicides just like Truman Capote's Breakfast at Tiffany's pleasantly surprised me. I have seen the film many years ago and I remember the feeling of nostalgia settling in after the film has ended. (I think Josh Hartnett's dreamy eyes played a part in it. ;) ) I found the book does the same. A well-constructed storytelling draws you into the adolescent impressionable world - dealing with growing up, falling in love and dying. The novel doesn't answer questions. Instead, the novel makes you want to cross the street from the boys' spying place to the Lisbons' house, knock on the door and ask, 'What is happening inside?'

 

The story is a reminisce of a grown man and is told from the collective first-person of teen-aged boys (I think there are 7 of them, I tried to count) who are obsessed with the enigmatic Lisbon sisters: Therese, Mary, Bonnie, Lux and Cecilia. Cecilia is the first one to attempt and complete suicide setting in motion series of various responses from neighbours and schoolmates. Her suicide stirs up the sleepy neighbourhood, confronts them and makes them deal with emotions and feelings that are suppressed due to being unacceptable in social circles. While the remaining sisters are attempting to move on with their lives - they too are confronted with social pressure and parental restriction. How do they escape?

 

The novel's narrative is stylistically flowing. This uncomplicated language adds to the emptiness of the beautiful world around when dealing with macabre events. The novel does not claim to be omniscient, but its memories are fragile just like the sisters.

 

One can discuss and draw so many different issues and themes from the novel that I think it would be perfect for any literary essay. One thing did surprise me that at the end, after having walked the reader through the story, the author calls the act of suicide "simple selfishness". My understanding that even as an adult, the narrator is still dealing with personal guilt and consciousness. 

 

Brilliant read. A must.

 

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review 2017-01-19 01:34
Miss Peregrine's Home For Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs
Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children - Ransom Riggs

A spine-tingling fantasy illustrated with haunting vintage photography, Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children will delight adults, teens, and anyone who relishes an adventure in the shadows. (Ransom Riggs)

 

A delightful book indeed, with elements of horror and fiction, this novel is definitely a must read for people of all ages. If you think you’re too old for a child fiction novel, recommend it to a teenager with a wild imagination. It may be a children’s novel but its wise beyond its target audience. More than being about deformed orphans at an orphanage…this novel is about accepting each others’ peculiarities and making them a tool against the bad in this world instead of staying the odd one out. (Believe me I know a lot about THAT)

 

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children is one of the best stories that people in growing age should read at least once. For adults, it may sound like a far stretch but its basic audience will definitely be smitten by the thick plot twists, the beautiful examples of a teenagers feel misplaced in this world with a little horror added to it. All parents should recommend this book to their teenagers. And if you are all grown up and haven’t read it (and love reading fiction) give it a try. It might be a bit childish in its language but its worth a read. Thanks for bearing with me.

 

Have a Great Read!

Source: writebeforeyouspeak.wordpress.com/2016/12/31/miss-peregrines-home-for-peculiar-children-by-ransom-riggs-book-review-fantasy-horror-novels-fiction-children
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text 2016-09-06 13:33

 

 

frankenstein-156488_1280

 

My first reaction as I started Mary Shelley's Frankenstein was:

 

It is an epistolary novel. Nobody told me that! Wait, when has that ever come up in a conversation anyway?

 

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So, the book started off with one of the characters writing letters to his sister while he's on a sea voyage.

 

The second thing that I noticed was boy, this guy can talk! So far, his chatter has not diminished my enjoyment of the book.

 

Mr. Monster has already made his first appearance although we only get to admire him from a distance. Now, I am listening to the good doctor's narrative.

 

A quote that stuck with me:

(On the subject of friends) "we are unfashioned creatures, but half made up, if one wiser, better, dearer than ourselves -- such a friend ought to be -- do not lend his aid to perfectionate our weak and faulty natures."

 

Capture

 

Find out more about Project Frankenstein.

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url 2016-05-11 11:12
Why we shouldn't protect teenagers from controversial issues in fiction

There are certain subjects – sex, drink, drugs, violence – that light fires and push buttons. So how do you write about them for teenagers?

 

Read more here.

Source: www.theguardian.com/childrens-books-site/2016/may/10/teenagers-controversial-issues-fiction-chris-vick
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quote 2015-12-02 15:18
Adolescents in a house demand that parents finally grow up themselves and be authentic, or else the young persons feel hampered in getting on with their own developmental process.
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