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text 2017-11-21 14:57
Reading progress update: I've read 129 out of 237 pages.
Family Matters - Anthony Rolls

the book's best quality seems to be a slow determinedness to go deliberately insane. the chemistry/toxicology aspect of the book cannot be accurate, but that doesn't matter, because the absurdity cooked up is so much fun: two poisoners trying to bump off the same dude are unknowingly putting a mixture into his body that is making him fit as a fiddle. if a third poisoner gets into the act, I suppose the guy will be accidentally transformed into Superman. a frothy, delicious Satire, so far! nasty, too.

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text 2017-11-20 22:55
Reading progress update: I've read 75 out of 237 pages.
Family Matters - Anthony Rolls

hmm, a lot of sharks in my entertainment today--just a fluke, I guess (was that a pun? sometimes I don't know...). I watched a Man from UNCLE episode today, and there was nasty, evil Carroll O'Conner with a lagoon full of sharks ready to eat any heroes asking to be tossed in (didn't go that way, haha bad guy, you lose/you lunch!), and then I put on Thunderball, and we have Largo bragging about catching sharks and selling them to eager customers. that's what you do if you're high up in SPECTRE...secondary income is something weird and exotic. 

 

finally, here I am immersed in Family Matters, which you would think would take me a million miles away from sharks...but Robert Kewdingham, now that he's decided not to loaf about and disappoint his wife and relations any more, is actually thinking to go to work as an engineer for a shark farm. proposed shark farm. anyway, I don't think Robert has decided to amount to something in time to avoid the various deaths by poison multiple family(!) members are planning for him.

 

so, sharks as a great selling-product--when people aren't being thrown to them--has been shoved in my face all day, and it's been fun. by the way, this book is perfect so far.

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review 2017-11-20 18:45
The Happy Man: A Tale of Horror by Eric C. Higgs
The Happy Man: A Tale of Horror - Eric C. Higgs

THE HAPPY MAN: A TALE OF HORROR is one bizarre piece of work from the 80's, brought back by Valancourt Books. I finished this book on Saturday and I still am not sure what to make of it!

 

A couple moves in to a new housing development in a suburb of San Diego. Charles Ripley and his wife are mostly on an even keel, despite a tragedy that occurred shortly after the move. Then, the Marsh's move in next door and even though they don't know it, the lives of the Ripley's are soon about to change.

 

First-the good. It is very difficult to put this book down. The chapters are short, (heck, the BOOK is short), and fast paced. Once things start happening, they don't stop happening until the very end.

 

Second-the baffling. I'm not sure what the point of THE HAPPY MAN is supposed to be? I'm pretty sure there's some commentary going on here about housing developments, suburbia, immigration, sex, monogamy, corporate America, family dynamics, drug use, the decline of morals in society and so on, but was that the point? I don't know!

 

Perhaps it's this simple: A man thought he was happy and then was shown that he wasn't? Or that it didn't take all that much to turn a happy, regular guy into something else altogether? Maybe everything is just as much a facade as was Charles Ripley's demeanor? Charles wasn't that good of a guy in the first place and it only took a small nudge to send him down the road of....well, you'll have to read this to find out.

 

I'm going with a 4/5 star rating because I'm still thinking about this short novel days later and also because it was VERY difficult to put down once started. I'm also going with RECOMMENDED, if only so that you and I could talk about it and I could see what you think, when you're done!

 

You can get a copy here: The Happy Man: A Tale of Horror

 

*I received an e-book free from Valancourt Books in exchange for my honest review. This is it!*

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text 2017-11-20 16:00
Reading progress update: I've read 4 out of 237 pages.
Family Matters - Anthony Rolls

I whizzed through Martin Edwards' Intro, and I'm also aware that he selected this novel as a terrific example of the type of book he discusses in the chapter called "The Ironists", in his reading guide The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books. there was no way I was going to put off for long any book filed under "The Ironists"; in fact, it's weird that I waited this long. The Ironists! love the sound of that!...hope the book is amazing! is it irony, if it's not...? maybe Alanis Morissette irony.

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review 2017-11-18 06:02
Romancing the Scot by May McGoldrick
Romancing the Scot (The Pennington Family) - May McGoldrick
Authors holding $100 Visa gift card giveaway to celebrate new series! Click Giveaway for chance. Ends Nov. 26

3.5 stars

I received this book for free in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

The Napoleonic Wars are over but the political maneuverings are far from, Grace and her father are traveling with messages from Joseph Bonaparte to his wife Julie. They are attacked and Grace ends up hiding in a crate that gets shipped off to Scotland. As the daughter of a French cavalry officer with Jacobite ancestors, Grace finds herself in a perilous position when she awakens in the home of a former English cavalry officer and current judge. 
Hugh still blames himself for not being able to rescue his wife and son during the war; he therefore likes dangerous hobbies such as ballooning. When an unconscious woman is found in the new basket he had delivered, he can't help but be drawn to her. 
Grace and Hugh may have been on opposite sides of the war but their serendipitous meeting will have them joining together.
 
"I shouldn't have kissed you," she finally managed to whisper.
"No, it was I," he said, his gaze still setting her body aflame even from two steps away. "But I don't regret it, and I don't think you do, either."
 

 
First in the new Pennington Family series, Romancing the Scotis a rich and intriguing tale. Hugh is our viscount, former cavalry officer, and current judge hero, whose parents you might remember from the authors' Scottish Dream Trilogy. I greatly appreciated the authors' attention to Hugh as a judge. We don't get a courtroom scene but instead an engaging look at how he approaches his cases, specifically through a case involving a deaf and mute woman accused of murdering her child (in the author's note, the case is said to be based on a real one). This approach not only allowed Hugh and Grace to bond through solving how to work the case, showing how Hugh appreciated Grace's mind and abilities, it also added unique details to an often written about time period. 
 
While Hugh provided the calm and commanding demeanor, Grace gave us the action and compelling components. She at first claims amnesia because she fears that her father fighting for Napoleon and her Jacobite ancestors might land her in trouble but can't keep lying as she grows closer with Hugh. Grace was a wonderful heroine who didn't need to be dramatically overwritten to show her brilliance in strength living the everyday life she was placed in. She traveled with her French cavalry father, fighting sicknesses, helping wounded, and marching in the muck like many of the women in her time did; she's utterly capable but also so human in her vulnerability. The story's drama comes from Grace running from men who killed her father and her thinking they're after a huge diamond she didn't know until later she was transporting. There are English and French spies and some machinations. 
 
The story started off right away at a bit of run and it did jolt me a bit as I had to attempt to place the characters and what exactly was going on but it does level off fairly quickly. The middle slowed a bit as I thought more of a focus on the romance between Grace and Hugh could have sparked vivacity but I also greatly enjoyed the feel of history in this historical romance. There's a mention of the Spa Fields riots, the workings of the law I mentioned, and a focus on the Scottish Clearances. If you read a fair amount of Scottish historicals from the 1800s, you've probably run across this historical event, what made this feel different was instead of just reciting what the Clearances were or did, the authors' focused on the actual people and effects, it felt more intimate. The historical components in this story felt true and woven in a way that immensely added to the feel and created a richer story tapestry. 
 
I thought the middle could have used more romance between our couple but I also believed in them when they made love, the writing sometimes veered toward flowery/purple, the plot was weaving and intriguing, and the historical components highly enriched the story. Hugh's sister Jo was a touching character in her own right and with the set-up (adopted, broken engagement) the authors' have alluded to, I can't wait to read her book. Romancing the Scot was just an all around interesting read and a strong beginning to the Pennington Family series. 
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