logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: Kazuo-Ishiguro
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2017-07-20 16:00
Book Booty, July 2017

 

A dear friend and colleague left the company recently. To us, it meant that we’d be seeing less of her. We decided to surprise her with a trip to The Tent and bought her a bevy of books. She loved it! We all got just a bit teary eyed but that’s life, isn’t it! You meet awesome people, get to know them better, and then become sad when you part ways with them.

Anyway, since I took myself there, I had to sample some of The Tent’s goodies. But you already knew that. So, this is what I got:

The Buried Giant is a book that I have wanted to get for a while now. The delicious controversy surrounding it and the rumor that it is fantasy without being fantasy have only convinced me to get it.

I loved both The Secret Life of Bees book and the movie. Wanting to see if the author’s other books are as magical, I have purchased this one as well. Now, I have two of her books in my collection:

Since people keep pairing the two, I have wanted to read this one ever since I read The Road. Now I can! The book can be used in lieu of a door stopper but if I can survive WoT, I am sure I will live to tell the tale after having read this one!

Read and loved this one, so I wanted it for my collection. I like the cover on this edition even though I have yet to watch the movie!

20170718_185308[1].jpg

I have heard mostly negative things about Memoirs of Geisha and how the author of that book has over-romanticized and out-slutted the role that geishas played in the Japanese society. From trusted sources come recommendations that present a more accurate picture. This author is one from that list and I couldn’t stop myself from getting this book.

20170717_201130[1].jpg

To be honest, I don’t know why I bought this…yet. I might read it or I might give it to someone who will get more use out of it than I would. Haven’t decided!

1.jpg

This was a wonderful find. This book-cum-RPG thing is why I love going to The Tent. I have found all sorts of amazing things there. If you remember my illustrated Hobbit and LOTR editions, that is where I got them from.

20170717_223644[1].jpg

The empty frame was filled with cards displaying characters from the book. Each card had the picture of a character at the front and some questions (that might help in brainstorming) at the back. Here are the cards:

20170714_210031[1].jpg

A closer look:

20170714_2101151.jpg

Am I crazy or are they really pretty? Like the book on Rock history, I haven’t decided what I am going to do with these yet. Any ideas?

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-07-14 15:05
A Review of Kazuo Ishiguro's Nocturnes
Nocturnes: Five Stories of Music and Nightfall - Kazuo Ishiguro

I think if you look at my ratings on Goodreads you'll see that I'm much more sympathetic to short story collections. A good short story collection often shows an author's commitment to craft. You can see how much care the author takes with every word, you can get a sense of his or her range when dealing with subject matter and characters. You can get a sense of how their style carries from one kind of story to another.

 

There is another reason -- there is very little money in short stories, even for established writers. Thus, writers write short stories "for the love of the game".

 

For the most part, the stories in this collection share a kind of tonal consistency. Each story tells a tale of disappointment, subtle loss, memory, and the way we look foolish in pursuit of a dream. All the stories share musical elements and songs. Various songs and melodies tie these stories together. But this short story collection could also have been about the travails of writers and writing.

 

The story "Come Rain or Come Shine" stuck out for me as a bit awkward. It wasn't poorly written. It featured compelling characters and fantastic dialogue. However, because the short story takes place in a single space and is mostly dialogue, I felt that the story would have been better as a one-act play. (In some ways, it reminded me of the low-budget, but clever movie "Tape" with Ethan Hawke and Uma Thurman). The story also features an absurd scene that doesn't quite work prose fiction but might have seemed less absurd and entertaining as a piece of theater physical comedy. You'll know the scene as soon as you read it.

 

There are some compelling reasons to stay away from these stories. One -- the emotional journies in these stories are subtle. There is rising action and things do happen, but by the end of the story, you often get the impression that the things that were left unsaid and that didn't happen were just as important. As a writer, I love these stories. I also appreciate how hard they are to pull off. Also -- the endings are not traditional endings. They may even feel like non-endings to some readers.

 

If you are a writer, there is also a compelling reason to read this book. A close reading of these stories will help you master your craft. In particular, these stories will help you master the craft of dialogue, character, and how to use compelling details.

 

Happy readings!

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-02-24 05:07
The Buried Giant: Or the Cost of Forgetting (and Remembering)
The Buried Giant: A novel - Kazuo Ishiguro

The language in this book, especially the dialogue, is highly stylized. It brings to mind not only a different time, but a different type of form altogether - at times it feels like a play, or performative storytelling. There's a disjointed dreamlike quality to the story itself, and there is a great deal of repetition. The voice is also quite distanced. Add all that together and it reminded me a bit of Gaiman swirled together with a dose of Shakespeare.

 

There is a great deal of symbolism at work, as well as ample themes. It's a great book to dig into and analyze if that's your cup of tea. The characters feel more like archetypes than they do specific people, at least to me. The plot also takes on more of a secondary role in service to the feel of the story rather than the movement.

 

So you're probably thinking, sure, but did you like it? Was it effective? Should I read this? Well...I don't really know how to answer any of that. For all this book's distinct and unique flavor I'm not sure I particularly enjoyed reading it. It didn't hit any overtly sour notes, but it never really gave me much I connected with either. It was like a meditation in book form. If you enjoy books that are all about the atmosphere, tone, and prose, or if you like fables designed to make you think, then this will likely be a good fit for you. If you're looking for high fantasy, adventure, or characters that steal your heart this one will likely leave you cold. As for me I'm glad I read it, but after my other stabs at Ishiguro I think I'm going to skip the rest of his oeuvre.

Like Reblog Comment
review 2017-01-05 00:00
The Remains of the Day
The Remains of the Day - Kazuo Ishiguro A serious look at professional identity and how it can devour your life. Every social interaction, almost every inner feeling that wouldn't fit the professional identity, is discarded even before Stevens himself is quite aware of it.
I personally found Stevens very real and rather tragic, and do so pity him.
The handling of the first person narrative is masterly. The voice is consistent throughout, never a slip of the tongue, always restrained, always unemotional. And despite that, we get to see the emotions and know quite a lot of things Stevens either doesn't know or doesn't admit to himself.

Despite Ishiguro's British upbringing, and himself disclaiming significant influence from Japanese writers, some overtones are reminding me of the few Japanese authors I read. Repressing the emotions (and pushing them inside where they are pressure-cooked to burst one day) does seem to be as much a Japanese trait as an English one, in any case.
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2016-09-24 14:16
Servants No Longer De Rigueur...
The Remains of the Day - Kazuo Ishiguro
I was honoured to be given the opportunity to give this book, as part of the World Book Night 2012. This was my first choice and enabled me to wax lyrical about this deceptively simple story, which explores in detail the reflections and experiences of a butler, Stevens, as he contemplates his life in service and the relevance of a life spent in service at a time of profound social change. Empathetically written, Ishiguro's prose is a sheer delight and his attention to detail and fine emotional expression is quite touching. Certainly not a thriller, yet I feel the intentionally pedestrian pace merely accentuates the absolute quality of the writing. A truly exceptional read!
 
 

 

Source: www.goodreads.com/review/show/1521144071
More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?