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Search tags: Libraries
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text 2018-04-29 17:46
Another meme

1. How often do you visit your local library?

Once in a while. But less now than earlier, since my sister didn't get a job there. ;) Also, they have doors that open automatically and my two-year-old daughter almost ran out into traffic before my sister could catch her (I was elsewhere with my son).
 
2. If you could visit any library in the world, which would it be?

Strangely enough I think I'd pick the one in the town next to here. It's very nice, but so are most libraries, even the tiny one in a village close to here, where most of the local residents are awful, but the librarians are great.

3. What books do you have on hold at the library, if any?

I don't usually borrow printed books anymore, just e-books. The only thing I have to wait for is for the week to pass. We only get to borrow two books a week, but since I have children, I'm usually busy, so I don't have that many nights when I'm alert enough to read but don't get to borrow one.

4. At what age did you get your first library card?

I was four or five, but then we moved to a town with a bigger library, and they said children had to use their parents' library cards.

Source: crimsoncorundum.dreamwidth.org/185851.html
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review 2018-03-28 06:37
Ex Libris: Stories of Librarians, Libraries, and Lore by Paula Guran (Editor)
Ex Libris: Stories of Librarians, Libraries, and Lore - Paula Guran

All the stories in this collection involve libraries or librarians. This collection of stories is a mixed bag - some stories were great, some original, others ok, a few I did not enjoy. A book to borrow first if you are interested.

 

 

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review 2018-03-26 16:59
Dear Fahrenheit 451 / Annie Spence
Dear Fahrenheit 451: Love and Heartbreak in the Stacks - Annie Spence

A Gen-X librarian's snarky, laugh-out-loud funny, deeply moving collection of love letters and break-up notes to the books in her life.

Librarians spend their lives weeding--not weeds but books! Books that have reached the end of their shelf life, both literally and figuratively. They remove the books that patrons no longer check out. And they put back the books they treasure. Annie Spence, who has a decade of experience as a Midwestern librarian, does this not only at her Michigan library but also at home, for her neighbors, at cocktail parties—everywhere. In Dear Fahrenheit 451, she addresses those books directly. We read her love letters to The Goldfinch and Matilda, as well as her snarky break-ups with Fifty Shades of Grey and Dear John. Her notes to The Virgin Suicides and The Time Traveler’s Wife feel like classics, sure to strike a powerful chord with readers. Through the lens of the books in her life, Annie comments on everything from women’s psychology to gay culture to health to poverty to childhood aspirations.

 

I read this book to fill a Book Riot Reader Harder challenge (a book of essays). I can’t help but feel that I *should* have liked this book much more than I did. I suspect it’s not the author, it’s me. I’m a bit too old to appreciate the author's sense of humour fully, being on the cusp between the Baby Boomers and Gen-X. Still, her essays are letters written to books found while weeding the library and that should be right up my alley.

I did like the book. Three stars is not a bad rating in my opinion. I think the author would be fun to have a drink with and discuss all the weird things that one finds in the library stacks. I’m always amazed, as a library cataloguer, what our librarians choose to add to the collection and what I find while I’m looking for something else.

I was heartened that I had read or at least heard of many of the books mentioned (and some still lurk in my TBR pile).

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review 2018-03-12 14:27
The Librarian of Auschwitz / Antonio Iturbe
The Librarian of Auschwitz - Antonio G. Iturbe,Lilit Zekulin Thwaites

Based on the experience of real-life Auschwitz prisoner Dita Kraus, this is the incredible story of a girl who risked her life to keep the magic of books alive during the Holocaust.
Fourteen-year-old Dita is one of the many imprisoned by the Nazis at Auschwitz. Taken, along with her mother and father, from the Terezín ghetto in Prague, Dita is adjusting to the constant terror that is life in the camp. When Jewish leader Freddy Hirsch asks Dita to take charge of the eight precious volumes the prisoners have managed to sneak past the guards, she agrees. And so Dita becomes the librarian of Auschwitz.

 

I enjoyed this book quite a bit, but I must admit that I was hoping for more. The story itself is fascinating and that’s what kept me reading. The writing was pedestrian, which was a disappointment. Still, I would recommend the book to those looking for an inspirational story concerning Auschwitz.

The narrative closely follows Dita Kraus, a 14 year old girl in the Auschwitz family camp and her experiences as the keeper and protector of eight forbidden books. I was interested that one of them was a history text by H.G. Wells, as I have been cataloguing a large collection of Wells’ writing during my work hours. I was also glad to see that they had several people that they designated as “living books” because they could tell certain stories (one woman could recount The Count of Monte Cristo). The concept of living books has recently been used at our city’s public library, so I was thrilled to see an example of the history of the practice.

If this time period and setting are interests of yours, I would recommend this book.

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text 2018-02-04 21:03
OMG Free books. I Love HEB.

I was following up on this post from Reading Is My Escape From Reality, which was reblogged from Leah's Bookish Obsession, and discovered that the Houston Public Library's e-card is free to all Texas residents, sponsored by the local grocery store chain HEB. Took me 5 minutes to sign up with my drivers license number, and now I have access to all their audiobooks on Overdrive!  Wooooohoooooo!

 

 

Seriously, HEB, when are you coming to North Texas so I can show you some love? 

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