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text 2018-01-16 19:38
Reading progress update: I've read 77 out of 167 pages.
Special Libraries: A Survival Guide - Toby Pearlstein,James M Matarazzo

I need a fiction break so more of MBFE.

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text 2018-01-16 01:36
Reading progress update: I've read 55 out of 167 pages.
Special Libraries: A Survival Guide - Toby Pearlstein,James M Matarazzo

Met my goal, the melatonin is kicking in, and I slept very badly yesterday night.   Gonna read MBFE for a bit before I go to sleep, though.   I find this article on newspaper libraries written in a more engaging style, so at least I'm enjoying this more!

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text 2018-01-15 21:56
Reading progress update: I've read 32 out of 167 pages.
Special Libraries: A Survival Guide - Toby Pearlstein,James M Matarazzo

I need a break.   The words are small, so high word count, and I'm finding this less interesting than my archive articles. 

 

So I'm going to read at least one hour of My Best Friend's Exorcism as a palate cleanser, and then try to get the third chapter of this book read. 

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quote 2018-01-08 01:38
Bookstores and libraries are places of refuge, somewhere to go when the skies are dark and rain is beating on the windows.

Tumblr

Source: bibliophileanon.tumblr.com/post/169397740512/bookstores-and-libraries-are-places-of-refuge
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review 2017-11-29 16:17
The Bad-Ass Librarians of Timbuktu / Joshua Hammer
The Bad-Ass Librarians of Timbuktu: And Their Race to Save the World’s Most Precious Manuscripts - Joshua Hammer

To save precious centuries-old Arabic texts from Al Qaeda, a band of librarians in Timbuktu pulls off a brazen heist worthy of Ocean’s Eleven.

In the 1980s, a young adventurer and collector for a government library, Abdel Kader Haidara, journeyed across the Sahara Desert and along the Niger River, tracking down and salvaging tens of thousands of ancient Islamic and secular manuscripts that had fallen into obscurity. The Bad-Ass Librarians of Timbuktu tells the incredible story of how Haidara, a mild-mannered archivist and historian from the legendary city of Timbuktu, later became one of the world’s greatest and most brazen smugglers.

In 2012, thousands of Al Qaeda militants from northwest Africa seized control of most of Mali, including Timbuktu. They imposed Sharia law, chopped off the hands of accused thieves, stoned to death unmarried couples, and threatened to destroy the great manuscripts. As the militants tightened their control over Timbuktu, Haidara organized a dangerous operation to sneak all 350,000 volumes out of the city to the safety of southern Mali.

 

I was fascinated by this account of the libraries/archives of irreplaceable old manuscripts in Arabic and other languages of North Africa and the Middle East. The first chapters introduce us to the main players in the manuscript biz, as they try to find & trade for these delicate, rare documents and set up local archives to store them.

I think many people forget how sophisticated the Arab world was, back when Europe was languishing in the Dark Ages. They were responsible for maintaining scientific knowledge, mathematics, medicine, and philosophy, while Europeans were being held back by a repressive Church. The Renaissance began when Europeans re-discovered the books that had been preserved by the Arabs.

I don’t know about you, but I remember being taught the history of civilization in grade school. I think it must have been about Grade 5 or 6 that we learned about Mesopotamia being the Cradle of Civilization and being part of the Fertile Crescent. And still, Western governments & researchers seem to be surprised to discover that non-European people had complex civilizations complete with books & universities. I was glad to see the people of North Africa hanging on to their patrimony and keeping these manuscript collections in their own countries, as they have the expertise to read and interpret them. Too often this kind of collection gets whisked off to some Western repository where it attracts limited interest and travel costs prevent African scholars from accessing them.

Reading about the history & variety of extremists in the area certainly gives one pause. So many of the names of the major players were familiar to anyone who follows the news, especially the kidnap victims. I was interested to fill in the details on why these events happened and what else was going on behind the scenes. I still don’t really comprehend the level of hostility of groups like Al Qaeda and the Taliban to art, culture, and literature, but I understand that they have a potentially mistaken idea of what early Islam was like (just as many fundamentalist Christians seem to have a skewed view of what early Christians were like). It seems like most fundamentalists have the same view of the world, i.e. that it is just a temporary waiting room before the real deal, the hereafter. What a limiting way to look at the world!

As a library worker who has dabbled in archival and museum collection description, I have to say that I was sincerely jealous of the people who got to work with the marvelous collections described in this volume. I would give my eye teeth to be involved in the cataloguing & digitization of such a significant resource!

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