logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: Mars
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-07-09 00:54
Disappointing
The Mars Room - Rachel Kushner

The Mars Room, Rachel Kushner, author and narrator

Although the author does a good job of reading the book, the subject matter could not hold my interest. The main character was a lap dancer. She is now being transferred to a new prison. She is serving two concurrent life sentences for murder. She describes her trip and some of her past. The story is bleak and dark. It is populated with characters who are miscreants and don’t seem to want to reform. Rather, some like the world inside better than the world at large.

The language the author uses is crude. Her characters are unlikeable. I got through about 1/3 of the book and finally just gave up. Simply put, the book depressed me. It may interest those who like stories about lawlessness, dysfunction and despair. It isn't my cup of tea. I didn't want to keep reading, hoping to find a redeeming feature. Sorry, but it was just too much of a downer for me

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-06-18 03:31
Review: Before Mars
Before Mars - Emma Newman

Third book in the series, and each is great in a totally different way. This one takes place concurrent to After Atlas, but instead of detective story, this is a psychological thriller where a protagonist fears her paranoia, but keeps finding reasons to mistrust the world around her. 

 

Once again, having not read the previous books wouldn't be an issue. There's some stuff at the end that would be quite obvious if you've read After Atlas, but the tension works either way. 

 

This is just such a great series. 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-06-15 17:29
Red Mars / Kim Stanley Robinson
Red Mars - Kim Stanley Robinson

For eons, sandstorms have swept the desolate landscape. For centuries, Mars has beckoned humans to conquer its hostile climate. Now, in 2026, a group of 100 colonists is about to fulfill that destiny.

John Boone, Maya Toitavna, Frank Chalmers & Arkady Bogdanov lead a terraforming mission. For some, Mars will become a passion driving them to daring acts of courage & madness. For others it offers an opportunity to strip the planet of its riches. For the genetic alchemists, it presents a chance to create a biomedical miracle, a breakthrough that could change all we know about life & death. The colonists orbit giant satellite mirrors to reflect light to the surface. Black dust sprinkled on the polar caps will capture warmth. Massive tunnels, kilometers deep, will be drilled into the mantle to create stupendous vents of hot gases. Against this backdrop of epic upheaval, rivalries, loves & friendships will form & fall to pieces--for there are those who will fight to the death to prevent Mars from ever being changed.

 

A “hard” science fiction book which takes the reader to Mars with the First Hundred settlers, tasked with making the planet livable for humans. There’s a lot of science in this one, folks, and not presented in Andy Weir’s humorous fashion as in The Martian. There were actually a couple of equations and diagrams, so if that kind of stuff gives you a rash, strike this book from your TBR.

Now, I’m generally a preferential fantasy reader, but I’m also a fan of science fiction, even occasionally this kind of technical science fiction, but I found the amount of detail about the building of things, the science of trying to change the atmosphere, the geology, etc., to be a bit excessive. If all the science-y stuff really turns your crank, you will love Red Mars.

This author could really have taken some lessons on describing landscapes from Zane Grey. Grey wrote romantic westerns in the early 20th century and is acknowledged for his beautiful descriptions of the settings of his tales. Mars in this book becomes rather like a wild west, also with some awesome (in the original sense of that word) landscape features, but they tend to be described in terms of physics, rather than the beauty that is inherent in them. Having seen the movie version of The Martian with its gorgeous planetary scenes, I feel there was room for a bit less utilitarian description of the features of Mars.

I’m glad that the author chose to have women in the First Hundred and that a couple of them achieve high standing among them. That said, there were some dynamics in the group that were awfully predictable. The two people who reach the highest are, of course, white American men. The author is a white American man, and its true that these positions have been disproportionately inhabited by that demographic, but wouldn’t it be more interesting if someone else rose to that level on Mars? There’s a lot of talk about building a new, fresh society, but things end up back in the old rut. (Perhaps that’s what the author intended, to be fair). There are also Russians on this mission, but they are stereotypically fixated on socialism and revolutionary plans. The two Russian women followed throughout the book are polar opposites—Maya is beautiful, emotional, flighty, and manipulative, while Nadia is plain, practical, solid, and steady. I loved Nadia, despite the fact that she was an engineer’s engineer, totally fixated on building and problem solving. But really, are those the only roles available to us? Beautiful prima donnas or practical Plain Janes?

I liked the book well enough that I will read the next one in the series, and not just because it is part of my reading project, but it will never be one of my favourites. And that’s okay, because it will be loved by the people who love this kind of book.

Book number 288 in my Science Fiction & Fantasy Reading Project.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-06-14 14:54
Reading progress update: I've read 498 out of 572 pages.
Red Mars - Kim Stanley Robinson

 

Due back at the library in 2 days and I will finish it this evening or know the reason why!

 

It's been a bit of slog. 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-06-13 14:46
Reading progress update: I've read 260 out of 572 pages.
Red Mars - Kim Stanley Robinson

 

Apparently Mars crews haven't acquired new social skills since junior high school.

 

Sigh!

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?