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Search tags: Mexican-food
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text 2018-11-08 21:08
24 Festive Tasks: Door 1 - Día de los Muertos, Task 4 (Mexican Food)

Mini beef tortillas with potato wedges, sourcream, and a dip that's half salsa and half guacamole.

 

Ordered in, not my own creation ... I couldn't be bothered to cook, having had to go into Cologne because my iphone was on strike and Apple STILL doesn't have location in Bonn where there are actually technicians as well, which pretty much killed my entire afternoon.  (Stopping by IKEA on the way home for another bookshelf, for the "leftovers" I hadn't been able to give a home in the big shelf makeover the other week, was child's play in comparison.)

 

I hadn't been planning on any dessert, but after Wanda's mouthwatering "Orange Gingerbread" post decided to treat myself to some of these, in the spirit of the Mexican theme:

 

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text 2014-06-10 02:05
Birthday Night.

Mexican food

This was SOOOOO filling! we also got dessert.... possibly the worst idea ever, but OMG so delicious.

 

me

Me tucking in.

 

dessert

Dessert.

 

movies

My Housemate and I (her birthday was on the 2nd, mine the 3rd) At the movies.

Saw the latest X-men movie, was pretty sweet.

 

movies

Movies^^^^

 

birthday cake

Birthday Cake my awesome friend made. Yes there is a penis on it.... No im not sure why, lol.

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review 2013-07-21 20:58
Mexican Food Made Simple
Mexican Food Made Simple - Thomasina Miers In my book it's not quite a beginner's mexian cookery book, but not far off it. You'd need to know a few things before embarking on this book but it's fairly simply done. You'd also need to search a bit for ingredients, although she does offer some options scattered throughout the book. It's interesting fare.
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review 2013-01-01 00:00
Planet Taco: A Global History of Mexican Food
Planet Taco: A Global History of Mexican Food - Jeffrey M. Pilcher Planet Taco is a scholarly exploration of Mexican food conducted by a trip through history. I am partial to Mexican history, Mexican food and societal analyses rooted in history. So Planet Taco hit on all my favorites. This book managed to maintain my interest through its disucssion of history and kept my hunger level at a constant high during my reading. Before reading this book, I had no idea that without human intervention corn would not have grown and existed, "maize florurished under human protection and to this day, it cannot reproduce in the wild." How wild is that? Someone stumbled on a corn plant in the wild and changed the world. Pilcher proposes some interesting ideas about servant and female labor which make a lot of sense. Yes, he discusses the influence of coloinazation and immigraiton on cuisine -- but what about the folks preparing the food?: "Scholars have only begun to explore the connections between household labor and the fate of empires." The female labor it takes to grind corn and turn it in to a usable food (tortillas) is immense. "Spanish historical documents provide ample information about agricultural production, which was gendered male, but typically remain silent about the female labor properation." Planet Taco discusses the labor intensity of consuming corn and its likely influence on different evolutions and changes in Mexican food. Such as the introduction of flour tortillas in the north, which took much less labor. He notes that scholars are not in agreement as to whether this resulted from the missionary influence but he proposes that women and servants may have had a hand in the change of the type of tortillas eaten in this region due to the lesser work involved. Potatoes, tomatoes, chilis, chocolate, corn (and on and on and on) are examples of the foods discovered in Mexico. And then introduced into Mexico - -citrus, sugar, coffee, cinammon, cilantro (yes cilantro!), bananas, beef, pork. What an amazing marriage of food and flavors. "People have been confused about the nature of Mexican food for hundreds of years. Certainly there was no authentic Mexican food in pre-Hispanic times." Pilcher interestingly discusses the various influences in Mexico food, society and culture by discussing the Asian labor and immigrants, the African slaves, and the influence from Europe. Corn and tomatoes when exported to Europe were not immediately embraced. Unfortuantely, when corn was exported it was exported without the indegineous knowledge. "Although prolific and versatile, maize has significant nutritional defects, particularly the lack of niacin, a B-vitamin essential to human health." Somehow every native people in the Americas that consumed corn understood this and developed a technology of adding niacin to the corn. This is freaking amazing to me. But, when Europeans and North Africans began initially consuming corn -- they did so without this knowledge to disastorous results. Epidemics of lack of nutirion followed in European communities that relied solely on corn. I loved this trip th rough history but done through a dietary manner. It was brillaintly done and I also appreciated that Pilcher makes note of how recent political and economic changes are effecting Mexico (and thus the USA). Mexico in a bizarre twist, the birthplace of maize is now competing with the US in the market of corn, "NAFTA, implemented in 1994, allowed the free entry of subsidized Midwestern maize (corn) to Mexico, undermining (Mexican unsubsidized) family farms and forcing many to migrate north in search of work."
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review 2012-06-12 00:00
Taco USA: How Mexican Food Conquered America
Taco USA: How Mexican Food Conquered America - Gustavo Arellano Though it can get a bit long at times (the chapter on restaurant history really felt like a long haul), the book overall is very good. Arellano is covering a lot of ground, but that is because Mexican food in the U.S. has taken so many forms, it has been transformed so many times, it has been adapted so often that it takes a lot of effort and research to track it all down. Track it all down the author has. From the early restaurants to food in the grocery stores with side trips about tequila and even the invention of the frozen margarita machine, Arellano covers it all from the early days of Mexican and American history to today. I did learn a lot, and I think a lot of readers will learn something as well. What I found amazing is that the food has taken such diverse forms and adaptations. In the end, Mexican food, as the U.S. sees it and consumes it is as much Mexican as it is something new that has been assimilated and adapted to the U.S. It was another immigrant so to speak. If you enjoy food writing, you will probably enjoy this book. If you enjoy microhistory books, you will like this book as well. There are a lot of interesting stories and details in this book. There are some well known tales, such as Mr. Bell starting what became Taco Bell to the lesser known stories of tamale vendors (well, lesser known today, but Arellano makes sure you know by the time you have read this book). Very good reading, and a book that will make you hungry for some Mexican food and some tequila. Similar books, or at least ones I have read and that I think will appeal to readers who like this one: * The Fortune Cookie Chronicles* Glazed America: a History of the Doughnut
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