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text 2017-07-16 10:33
Reading progress update: I've read 176 out of 346 pages.
Life and Letters of Charles Darwin - Volume 1: By Charles Darwin - Illustrated - Charles Darwin

Religion; this debate doesn't seem to have changed at all between then and now.

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text 2017-07-13 04:39
Science Buddy Read Book Club coming soon!
Horseshoe Crabs and Velvet Worms: The Story of the Animals and Plants That Time Has Left Behind - Richard Fortey
Atoms Under the Floorboards: The Surprising Science Hidden in Your Home - Chris Woodford
Stuff Matters: Exploring the Marvelous Materials That Shape Our Man-Made World - Mark Miodownik
The Science of Everyday Life - Marty Jopson
Rain: A Natural and Cultural History - Cynthia Barnett
The Inheritor's Powder: A Tale of Arsenic, Murder, and the New Forensic Science - Sandra Hempel
The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat - Oliver Sacks
What Really Happens If You're Swallowed by a Whale, Get Shot from a Cannon, or Go Barreling Over Niagara...and Then You're Dead - Paul Doherty,Cody Cassidy
Furry Logic: The Physics of Animal Life - Matin Durrani,Liz Kalaugher
My Beloved Brontosaurus: On the Road with Old Bones, New Science, and Our Favorite Dinosaurs - Brian Switek

Our current buddy read of The Invention of Nature is going well enough that when it's finished, we're going to convert the book club into a general science buddy read club.

 

We definitely need a snappier name for it.

 

In the meantime, the current members are going through their shelves and coming up with possible titles for future reads; we'll likely read one book every two months, as non-fiction is generally a more time consuming read and we don't want to burn anyone out with too much of a good thing.  

 

I've gone through my Planning to Read shelf and shelved all the science books onto the science shelf (something I generally don't do until I've read the book - more out of laziness than anything else) and I've included a few here to see if any of them look interesting to anyone else, or are maybe already on their shelves.  

 

I have 16 all up; if anyone has any interest in seeing them all, I have confirmed that if you go to my shelves (or anyone else's for that matter) and click on Planning to Read, and then click on my Science shelf, you'll only see the Science books I have that I haven't yet read.  BookLikes has a bit of boolean searching power it's been keeping under its hat.

 

I've stuck with hard sciences (left out philosophy for example), but as a member of the group I'm open to interpretations.  

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text 2017-07-04 08:00
Reading progress update: I've read 168 out of 346 pages.
Life and Letters of Charles Darwin - Volume 1: By Charles Darwin - Illustrated - Charles Darwin

The first mention (in this book) of working on "the species question" comes in a letter dated 1840.

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review 2017-07-03 08:33
Tales From The Underground by David W. Wolfe
Tales From The Underground: A Natural History Of Subterranean Life - David W. Wolfe

TITLE:  Tales from the Underground:  A Natural History of Subterranean Life

 

AUTHOR:  David W. Wolfe

 

DATE PUBLISHED:  2002

 

FORMAT:  Paperback

 

ISBN-13:  9780738206790

 

The subterranean is not one world but many.  It is filled with many unique habitats, and the occupants of these habitats range in size from the microscopic bacteria to the easily visible earth worms and burrowing animals.  Tales from the Underground is not intended as a comprehensive treatment of the subject of soil ecology.  The author's goal is to introduce the reader to a few of the most intriguing creatures on the underground and to the sometimes equally intriguing scientists and explorers who have studied them.   With the many interesting creatures and scientists discussed in this book, I feel the author has achieved his goals.

This book takes a look at the Earth's most ancient life forms, the extremophiles; bacterium; fungi; earthworms; the dual nature of soils with regards to deadly plant and animal diseases; the tragic history of human interactions with prairie dogs, burrowing owls and the black-footed ferret.  This book also explores the impact of human activities on the soil resources important to our food security and the potential for using soil microbes for intermediation of damaged soil.  The author also takes a look at the various hypothesis that try to explain the origin of life in which dirt or soil play a role e.g. the "clay-gene" theory in which clay crystals act as a catalyst and gene precursors.

The author states that he hopes that as more of us become aware of the life beneath our feet, we will be inclined to work together to maintain the biological integrity of the underground, an preserve some of what we find there for future generations.


"With each new subterranean discovery, it becomes more apparent that the niche occupied by Homo sapiens is more fragile and much less central than we once thought."


This book contains diagrams where relevant and a decent reference section.  However, the author tends to select too many examples and creatures from the U.S.A, which is a bit annoying, since there is an entire planet full of underground creatures and humans that interact with them.  The book is well written without excessive biographical detail and a fair amount of detailed information on each topic.  I believe this book would be easy to understand for the general reader.  Tales of the Underground provides an enjoyable look at some of the interesting underground citizens.

 

 

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text 2017-06-15 17:51
Reading progress update: I've read 150 out of 346 pages.
Life and Letters of Charles Darwin - Volume 1: By Charles Darwin - Illustrated - Charles Darwin

Darwin is glad to be home after five years away on a journey meant only to take two.

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