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Search tags: Robert-Jackson-Bennett
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review 2018-07-15 14:18
Foundryside
Foundryside - Robert Jackson Bennett

I wasn't sure when I requested this on Netgalley that I would like this as it didn't seem like what I normally read but in the end I really enjoyed it. This mostly follows Sancia who makes money for stealing things. She ends up being hired to steal something that is very valuable that will lead her into danger.

 

I really enjoyed reading about Sancia and all the other characters in the book. I even liked the characters that were the villains. villains. Sancia is gifted in a way most people are not and it was interesting when it was realized why she is the way she is.

 

I liked reading about the background about all of the different merchant houses and how scriving came to be. I am definitely interested in continuing this series as it looks like it's going to be really good.

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review 2018-05-19 15:13
It's not a you thing, its probably a me thing...
City of Stairs - Robert Jackson Bennett


"Time renders all people and all things silent. And gods, it seems, are no exception."

 

Wellllll, I hate to be the odd duckling here BUT I just didn't love this as much as everyone else did. Now that's not to say that I didn't enjoy it. I just didn't fall hopelessly, googly- heart eyed in love with it. The premise was unique, the pacing was great, the writing was well done, the characters were interesting and the ending was nice and tidy...BUT... I just didn't care much. It was most likely a case of it's-not-you-it's-me so I won't be too harsh with the rating BUT again, I wish I cared more what happens next. There were also a lot of great quotes, too many in fact to add here.

 

"The world is a coward, he thinks. It does not change before your face; it waits until your back is turned, and pounces.…"

 

All in all this was a satisfying read and the ending was buffed to a shine and wrapped up nicely with a spiffy bow and a thank you card.

 

"Humans are strange, Shara Komayd. They value punishment because they think it means their actions are important—that they are important. You don’t get punished for doing something unimportant, after all."

 

~Enjoy

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review 2018-02-22 23:00
City of Miracles by Robert Jackson Bennett
City of Miracles (The Divine Cities) - Robert Jackson Bennett

STOP right here!  If you haven’t read the first two books in Robert Jackson Bennett’s The Divine Cities series yet, add them to the top of your list!  You don’t know what you’re missing!  City of Miracles just won’t read the same without having read the City of Stairs and City of Blades.

 

Shara Komayd is a legend, one who has received a vast number of death threats.  As a former covert agent and then the Prime Minister, Shara battled gods and enemies, wreaking great changes in the world.  Shara cleaned house at Parliament before she herself was given the boot.  During her heyday, Shara had a lot of help from her friends!  One of the most memorable of those is Sigrud je Harkvaldsson, a great brute of a man (think Viking).  Shara rescued Sigrud from prison and he worked with her and protected her every step of the way.  Then there is General Mulaghesh who shined so brightly in those battles.  She is brilliant, damaged and IMHO, a great hero in her own right.  I love these characters and I’m invested!     

 

In City of Blades, hell hath no fury like Sigrud je Harkvaldsson!  Still haunted by the death of a loved one and the revenge he took thereafter, Sigrud has lived in hiding now for 13 years.  He’s moved from job to job, keeping a low profile.  (Well…as low a profile as he can manage, you know…being Viking-like and all!)  Ever-faithful to his comrade-in-arms Shara Komayd, he knows that one day she will clear his name and summon him to her side once again.  Yet when he finally has news of Shara, it’s only to learn that she has been assassinated, and even though he is a wanted man, he knows it’s time to come out of hiding.  He must find out who killed Shara and take revenge.  He also finds himself thinking of her adopted daughter, Tatyana Komayd, wondering what will become of her.  He has only seen her once in her life but she’s the one thing he has left of his closest friend.   

 

Vengeance is the name of the game when it comes to Sigrud but he is still so likeable.  His revenge always seems to be for all the right reasons and this man could star in his own action movie.  He also oozes a heart of gold for those he loves.  His uncanny lack of aging is a mystery to him and us.  During his investigations, Sigrud discovers the fact that Shara still harbored some secrets at the end of her life leaving him with more questions than answers.  Look out, he’s about to open a whole new can of worms about the Divine!   

 

RJB chose to shift the focus to another character in each book which was a great tool and kept the series very interesting.  I’m not sure which he thought would turn out to be the most popular character but I know who mine is.  General Mulaghesh took the prize hands down in City of Blades.  This is a very well-rounded series, full of mystery, suspense, action and just plain good storytelling! 

 

Robert Jackson Bennett has become one of my favorite authors with his amazing The Divine Cities series.  I am really curious to check out some of his earlier books and I highly recommend you read this series!

 

I want to thank the publisher (Crown Publishing) for providing me with the ARC through NetGalley for an honest review.

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text 2017-12-27 23:01
Top 5 books of 2017
A Conjuring of Light - V.E. Schwab
City of Miracles - Robert Jackson Bennett
Raven Stratagem - Yoon Ha Lee
The Ninth Rain - Jen Williams
The Bear and the Nightingale: A Novel - Katherine Arden

I didn't do a book challenge this year, but I still ended up reading about 60 books and graphic novels, as well as starting another 8-9. A bunch of those were re-reads, as I got ready to finish off or continue trilogies, while I also went on a big Earthsea jaunt as I'd never read all the novels in one go before. 

 

Anyway, here are my top 5 books of the year (graphic novels excluded), in no particular order:

 

A Conjuring of Light by V.E. Schwab - stunning conclusion to a great series, just wish I liked her YA books as much as I liked these!

 

City of Miracles by Robert Jackson Bennett - another trilogy-concluder, with each book featuring what I've described as 'grumpy olds doing stuff'.

 

Raven Stratagem by Yoon Ha Lee - second book in a trilogy this time, but while I enjoyed Ninefox Gambit a lot, I thought this book was far more accessible and I can't wait to see what happens in Revenant Gun next year. 

 

The Ninth Rain by Jen Williams - a first book this time, curses! I really enjoyed her Copper Cat series (which starts with The Copper Promise, for anyone who's interested) but this book kicks things up a notch. The next book, The Bitter Twins, is due out in March and I can't wait...

 

The Bear and the Nightingale by Katherine Arden - another first book in a series, not to everyone's taste but it more than worked for me! The next book, The Girl in the Tower, is already out and I need to get hold of it when it eventually arrives in paperback. 

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review 2017-10-09 17:12
The Glamorisation of Suffering: "City of Stairs" by Robert Jackson Bennett
City of Stairs - Robert Jackson Bennett

When is it necessary to kill a character to get a point across? I’m thinking about Vo here. By the time we get to the point when things get moving, I’ve already seen how damaging his religious upbringing had been to him. I've already seen how it had wreaked him and how this agony had shaped him into the character’s he'd become. I got that; bumping him off does nothing to further highlight the deed, nor to bring forth the message I got from killing him off. His death is just lazy writing. In fact, his death serves no narrative purpose and hence, it saps the very directive it was supposedly delivering. People don't just suffer in a void. Not all pain leads to tragic and abject death. Such “glamorisation” of suffering is a method to avoid endorsing and responding to that suffering. When everyone dies, it's sad, but we aren't called upon to answer for how we or our society has contributed to their suffering. We ache and move on. Nothing we do can change the fact that they are dead, and we have no impetus to change our ways because that impetus has ceased breathing. But when there's a living person staring you in the face, you are forced to acknowledge and come to terms with the reality of that person and how their suffering takes place in your world. This state-of-affairs is not so much with the Urban SF writers themselves as it is the culture of apparent "laziness" that they seem to have inspired (e.g., Grimdark comes to mind with so many bad imitators out there). 

 

 

If you're into SF, read on.

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