logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: Sunset
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-12-10 19:08
The Towers of the Sunset / L.E. Modesitt
The Towers of the Sunset - L.E. Modesitt Jr.

Tells the story of Creslin, son of a powerful military matriarch, who chooses exile rather than an arranged marriage. He sets out on a search for his true identity as a man, developing his magical talents through constant conflict with the enigmatic white wizards of Candar.

 

I really enjoyed the beginning of this book, with the male/female role reversal. The young man, Creslin, who is kept in seclusion to be pure for marriage, the reluctance to teach him fighting skills because he will have women to defend him, his major life role to be a consort to a powerful woman somewhere. And because he has insisted on learning to fight and to ski, we get a runaway groom instead of a runaway bride! I’ve read this particular pattern with a female lead character quite often and it was refreshing to see a male character get the same treatment.

Later in the book, there is some interesting exploration of the nature of man-woman relationships, the differences between the priorities of the sexes when it comes to love, perhaps? Not as spot-on for me as the beginning of the story, but still a long way from the fiction where only the man’s opinion matters.

Somewhat confusing sometimes was the alignment of the colour black with Order Magic and white with Chaos Magic. Kind of reversing the usual good/evil colour associations. Not that either form of magic is painted entirely good or evil—Creslin learns that he can certainly cause bad things to happen with his Order magic. It’s like the old saying about knives. It isn’t the knife that is good or bad, it’s the intention of the person wielding it.

Book number 302 in my Science Fiction & Fantasy reading project.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-10-10 18:40
Baby trees -- but I don't need another hobby!
Bonsai Basics: A Step-by-Step Guide to Growing, Training & General Care - Christian Pessey,Remy Samson
Bonsai: Illustrated Guide to an Ancient Art - Sunset Books,Buff Bradley

I'm not sure when I bought these books, but it was probably around 2002 or 2003.  They've been in a box out in the workshop, untouched since at least 2006.  They may never have been opened or read.

 

Believe it or not, one of the reasons in favor of my staying in Arizona is that I don't want to leave my ironwood tree, especially after it bloomed so spectacularly last spring.  I had to leave a magnificent white oak tree when we moved from Indiana, and I'm just not sure I can uproot myself -- pun intended -- from another beloved tree.

 

It's possible, from what I've seen online, to grow desert ironwood trees as bonsai.  I think I can still find some seeds in the yard, but I'm not sure how well they sprout.  I haven't seen any seedlings in the yard, though we've had quite a bit of rain lately that has other little plants shooting up.

 

So, I gotta think about this.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-09-26 21:23
SUNSET by Erin Hunter
Sunset - Erin Hunter
Ending of series 2 in the Warriors series.  Some of the story lines are ended but others open up here.  The clans are adjusting to their new homes with the usual fights over borders and Two Legs interfering with the clans' lands.  Leafpaw is getting many visions.  Which are true?  Which are hers?  The prophecy comes true.  But who is the traitor now?  Does Leafpaw confront some of the others or not? 
 
I like this series.  I hope my questions get answered in series 3.  I think I know the answers to my questions but I want confirmation of those answers.  This is a good ending of series 2 and sets up series 3.  Excellent world building.
Like Reblog Comment
review 2018-09-03 22:32
Sunset in Laguna (Finding Forever in Laguna Book 3) by Claire Marti
Sunset in Laguna - Claire Marti

 

Even in our darkest moments, we never walk alone. Christian is the beast fighting his way through his demons with a little help from the angel on his shoulder. Marti examines the bruises of a battered soul and the strength of a determined crusader intent on mending a broken heart. Sunset in Laguna reminds that ugliness can hide in the most beautiful faces and places, but beauty thrives no matter how dark the surroundings. Christian and Kelly are a match made in hopelessness, that are learning what it means to hope.

Like Reblog Comment
review SPOILER ALERT! 2018-08-27 20:38
Thirteen Days by Sunset Beach - Book Review ***spoilers***
Thirteen Days by Sunset Beach (Fiction Without Frontiers) - Ramsey Campbell

Ramsey Campbell

Flame Tree Press

Publication Date: 6th September 2018

 Book Review

 

 

“They feed so Skiá feeds”

 

I had the pleasure of receiving a copy of this book to review in exchange for an honest review. Thank you to NetGalley and Flame Tree Press.

 

My fiancé is a huge Ramsey Campbell fan so he was just as excited as me for me to begin. His writing has been a great source of comfort for Andy over the years and he takes every opportunity he can to re read the books he owns. I can see why, the writing is so fluid and detailed, pulling you in one sentence at a time, engulfing you with this feeling that you are there, right in the middle of the unfolding drama. I was dragged in from the start with this book; the increasing tension, the desperation to know just exactly what was happening, I found it hard to put down, only stopping when real life traumas like work got in my way (even then I was reading it on my lunch break, so engrossed that I didn’t hear my colleague trying to talk to me for over 10 minutes).

 

I really appreciated that we were never given the full picture of what was happening until quite near the end. I knew from the start there was something ‘off’ with the Greek Island of Vasilema, there was something unseen and unspoken, a darkness that lingered and terrified. Only the locals seemed to know, but they appeared to ignore it, or at least pretend to.

 

The tone of the story was very much about our mortality and prolonging life. The focus of the book surrounded Ray and Sandra, as well as their children and grandchildren. We are aware from the beginning that something is wrong with Sandra, we can feel the concern and protectiveness that Ray has for her, confirmed when he proceeds to put on a facade of normality for the rest of the family. He doesn’t want to ruin the family vacation. The descriptiveness of how frail Sandra was, the writing was both delicate and yet intense, fully encompassing just how brittle she appeared to be, and how she was deteriorating before Ray. The way she was then invigorated, seemingly from a bite, or the island, or a combination, gathering her strength back very slowly over the two weeks, was beautiful to read yet unnerving all the same.

I found all the subtle references throughout the book relating to mortality, and the curse of immortality I felt, very well thought out and very well placed. The driving force of the story, the family, their relationships, and their coming to terms with Sandra’s illness, was so well integrated with the underlying tension of darkness. It was claustrophobic in parts, this all encompassing, all controlling darkness; it seemed to be the all powerful force on the island. Even the buses wouldn’t stop after dark.

After the initial night, Sandra had been bitten by some kind of insect after falling asleep on the balcony outside their room. While Ray and Sandra awaited the rest of the family at a local taverna, Chloe’s Garden, the waitress seemed to be quite disconcerted with Sandra’s bite. Responding with “I pray not” when Ray comments “at least my wife won’t get bitten here”. There were also the seemingly religious women on the bus, blessing Sandra, Tim and Jonquil (the three members of the family in total who had been bitten) every time they boarded; we found near the end of the book that it was only these three family members whom the women had been blessing, and no one else. They appeared to know that they had been tainted in some way by the island. I particularly enjoyed a scene over dinner one evening in Chloe’s Garden, in which birthday greetings of a long life were conveyed, and rebuked, as they are seen to be more than a curse by the locals.

From the start you could feel the underlying oppression, a dark force, something that wanted to feed, that needed to feed. The phrase, “They feed so Skiá feeds” becomes more and more unsettling. Even more unnerving was what felt like captivity in some ways, they just couldn’t leave the island. Boat trips cancelled, the owners of tour boats and fishing boats refusing to take them – ‘them’ referring to Sandra, Tim and Jonquil. There is a notion mentioned several times relating to ‘coming back to find your memories’, rather than to re-live them, I found this to be very unsettling indeed, what happens to you here that you forget after you leave? The story ended with the family leaving on the ferry away from the island, with Sandra, Jonquil and Tim trying to remember the details of their two week vacation. It was ambiguous yet implied that they were beginning to forget.

 

5/5 – If I could give it more I would. This book is beautifully thought out and so amazingly written. It really gets you thinking, and stays with you afterwards.

Lesley-Ann (The Housewife of Horror)

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?