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Search tags: The-Bell-Jar
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review 2018-12-01 01:30
What kind of superpower do you have?
El Deafo - Cece Bell

El Deafo by Cece Bell is the autobiographical account of the author as a little girl after she contracted meningitis and became deaf. First point in this book's favor: The illustrations are absolutely delightful. If you were a fan of the Arthur cartoon growing up then you'll love her artistic style as it's very reminiscent of that. (The characters are all rabbits.) She focuses primarily on her experiences using the different hearing aid devices that she had growing up and how isolated it made her feel. Bell doesn't shy away from exploring her shame and 'otherness' in comparison to her family and friends which I think is refreshing in a middle grade book. The way that Cece ultimately copes with the changes and difficulties that she's experiencing is by creating an alternate persona where she uses her deafness as a superpower. (Check the picture below for an example.) I personally really loved the references of such classics as Batman (with Adam West) and one of my faves M*A*S*H. I don't know that younger readers will appreciate that as much but I thought it was a great touch. Included at the end of El Deafo is a little informational blurb about Deaf culture so if parents are reading with their kids (or teachers with their students) it makes a really awesome learning tool. I loved that kids are getting to see a character using a hearing device in a medium that is easily digestible and conveys the message that no matter what our abilities we are all 'super' in our own ways. 9/10

 

An example of the art writing style. [Source: Goodreads]

 

 

If you don't follow me on social media you may have been surprised/confused when I started posting a new review every day this week. I did this because I didn't want to play catch-up like I did earlier this year with books I've finished but not yet reviewed. However, I'm not seeing a ton of engagement in these posts so I want to get your opinion. Are you enjoying the more frequent posts or do you prefer once a week and you don't care when they go up? Please comment below with your thoughts! :-)

 

What's Up Next: Cici's Journal: The Adventures of a Writer-in-Training by Joris Chamblain with illustrations by Aurélie Neyret. 

 

What I'm Currently Reading: Guns, Germs, and Steel by Jared Diamond

Source: readingfortheheckofit.blogspot.com
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text 2018-11-23 09:06
24 Festive Tasks: Veterans' Day/Armistice Day, Task #3
The Complete Sherlock Holmes - Arthur Conan Doyle
The Complete Sherlock Holmes - Arthur Conan Doyle
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Arthur Conan Doyle,Paul Hogarth
The Annotated Sherlock Holmes Volume 1 and 2 - William S. Baring-Gould, Arthur Conan Doyle
Sherlock Holmes: The Definitive Collection - Arthur Conan Doyle,Stephen Fry
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Arthur Conan Doyle
The Speckled Band - Arthur Conan Doyle
A Study in Scarlet / The Hound of the Baskervilles - Arthur Conan Doyle
The Hound of the Baskervilles - Illustrated - Arthur Conan Doyle
A Study in Scarlet - Joseph Bell, Arthur Conan Doyle

Task 3:  Tell us: What author’s books would you consider yourself a veteran of (i.e., by which author have you read particularly many books – or maybe even all of them)?

 

I'm a completist and a re-reader-ist so there are a few authors I could use for this task, but really there can be only one.  And he's Scottish, so the possibly obscure movie/TV reference works.

 

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.  Sherlock Holmes.  The former one of only two authors I'd go out of my way for the chance to have dinner with (assuming death is not an obstacle) and the latter my numero uno literary hero.

 

I have read the entire Sherlock Holmes canon multiple times and as you can see above, I own several editions of both the complete works and individual titles.  I'm pretty sure they're just the beginning too, because if I thought it was hard to pass by additional editions of Jane Austen's works (I have at least 2 of all her works, 3 of some, and I think I'm up to 4 P&P editions) it's downright impossible for me to pass by a good Sherlock Holmes - especially an older edition.

 

Even though I've read all the stories at least 4 times, there is a lot I learn every time - things I've forgotten or overlooked, or simply 'get' because of new life experiences.  This makes me hesitant to go toe-to-toe with anyone over most of the stories themselves, but I definitely consider myself enough of a 'veteran' to wade into any conversation about Holmes and Watson as characters with confidence.

 

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text 2018-11-20 12:07
The House of the Seven Gables (Oxford World's Classics) - Michael Davitt Bell,Nathaniel Hawthorne

My goodness I am struggling with this one. I'm almost half way through the story and nothing has happened! Well, alright, that is a slight exaggeration, the old lady has opened a shop, a little boy comes in repeatedly to eat her biscuits, a young relation has turned up on her doorstep as has her brother(?) . 132 pages! Wow! This was another author that got paid by the word, I should think. Yawn. I will persevere but, really, it's hard work/

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review 2018-10-30 08:17
Rebarbativeness: "The Bell" by Iris Murdoch
The Bell - Iris Murdoch,A.S. Byatt


(Original Review, 2002)


“Toby had received, though not yet digested, one of the earliest lessons of adult life: that one is never secure. At any moment one can be removed from a state of guileless serenity and plunged into its opposite, without any intermediate condition, so high about us do the waters rise of our own and other people’s imperfection.”


In "The Bell" by Iris Murdoch


I first encountered the word 'rebarbative' in The Bell.

 

 

If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review.

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review 2018-10-19 03:41
Open Your Mouth Like a Bell
Open Your Mouth Like a Bell - Mindy Nettifee

Mindy Nettifee won my heart years ago with her collection Rise of the Trust Fall, and she has yet to disappoint me since. Insightful, lyrical, and straight from the heart Nettifee's verse hits me right between the eyes and in the blood. Filled with several poems written surrounding the 2016 election there is a political core here that resonates strongly with me. I am so very thankful for her voice.

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