logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: Tie-In-Edition
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-10-24 00:54
Backwater by Tom Deady
Backwater - Tom Deady

Tom Deady is an author I discovered last year, and was glad I did! Although this newest addition was a tad more predictable than his prior works, it was still very well-written. He is definitely an author to watch out for, because he is going places.

 

If you decide to read one of his books, I highly recommend Haven or Eternal Darkness. They were excellent!

3 stars

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-10-19 22:28
Reading progress update: I've read 10 out of 272 pages.
American Reformers, 1815-1860, Revised Edition - Ronald G. Walters

Earlier this week I combed through my shelves and pulled out a half-dozen books to add to the book box. All of them were unread, but they are all books that I can get through our district's library system. One of them is Walters's book on antebellum reformers, which I have been meaning to read for years; I sampled the introduction, and I came across this:

[T]he patterns of thought were the same: old values were being lost and whatever was at fault had to be eliminated or controlled if America was to fulfill its destiny. Behind that reasoning was a suspicious mentality characteristic of many antebellum reformers, as well as non-reformers, that attributed the nations troubles to conspiracies of one sort or another . . . To believe that plotters were responsible for what was happening to the country was wrong; but it was part of a quest, going back at least to the eighteenth century, for secular terms in which to analyze politics and social change. Rather than seeing the hand of God moving events, many antebellum Americans saw the hands of sinister individuals. That may not have been accurate, but it was about as good as any other explanation available before Marx and modern social science.

And just like that, my reading for this weekend was set.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-10-11 17:39
Bright Lights, Dark Skies by Jess Hanna
Bright Lights, Dark Skies - Jess Hanna

 

A very well written "alien abduction" story from a Christian point of view. The author did a fantastic job in describing that feeling of foreboding that one gets when you know something is there, but you don't want to look. I just thought he did a great job in describing the main character and how his life slowly spirals out of his control because of his close encounter.

Really good book with a great message that is worth consideration when it comes to the subject of UFO's.

Definitely recommended!
 

 

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-10-11 07:07
We Have Always Lived in the Castle (audiobook) by Shirley Jackson, narrated by Bernadette Dunne
We Have Always Lived in the Castle: Acting Edition - Shirley Jackson

The Blackwood family used to be much bigger, but now there is only 18-year-old Mary Katherine (Merricat), her older sister Constance, their Uncle Julian, and Merricat's cat, Jonas. Merricat is the only Blackwood who ever leaves the house. She does all the grocery shopping and tries her best to act normal and unafraid, but inside she is a seething mass of rage and fear, quietly wishing all the townspeople dead as some of them taunt her. When she is not running errands, she spends all her time playing with Jonas and devising protections for her home that usually involve burying or hanging items around various places on Blackwood land. Meanwhile, Constance cheerfully and patiently cares for her and Uncle Julian, who is unable to walk and who spends his days writing about and obsessing over an event that occurred several years ago. The delicate balance of all their lives is disturbed by the arrival of Charles, Merricat and Constance's cousin and Julian's nephew.

This was a deeply distressing story.

I enjoyed the beginning. The Blackwood family's past was hinted at, and I came up with theories as to what had happened, who was involved, and how they were involved. The pacing didn't always work for me, and the book dragged more than a bit after Charles arrived, primarily because I thought I knew where Jackson was going with the story and I wanted her to finally get on with it.

As it turns out, I was exactly right about what happened to the Blackwood family - it's so easy to guess that I'm not even sure it counts as a spoiler. I was very wrong about where Jackson was planning on going with it all, however. When things finally came to a head, the results were unsettling and utterly horrific.

I don't suppose I liked the pacing after that much better, but it didn't seem to matter as much. I was compelled to find out just how far Jackson would go (thankfully not as far as I feared - I'm not sure I could have taken it). This is only the second work of hers that I've read or listened to, but it's enough to see that she's a master at writing increasingly unsettling heroines. I wouldn't call Merricat likeable, but overall she worked better for me than The Haunting of Hill House's Eleanor. I went from feeling annoyed and frustrated with Merricat and her childishness, to horror at her and Constance's relationship, to nearly crying for the both of them at the end.

By the end of the story, quite a few things are up to the reader's interpretation. Unfortunately, most of the big questions I had were never answered. Like the pacing, this didn't seem to matter as much to me as it should have. I was too raw from listening to Constance and Merricat try to cobble together a new "normal" for themselves to care that I hadn't gotten all the details about the Blackwood family's fate that I'd wanted, or more details about what was going on with Constance.

Bernadette Dunne's narration was great. I enjoyed her voices for all the main characters. The only things that irked me a bit were her voices for the town boys, which sounded cartoonish and contributed to a theory I had (and soon scrapped) that the taunting was all in Merricat's head.

 

Rating Note:

 

I wasn't sure how to rate this. I settled on 4 stars, even though it left me feeling terrible, because of how compelling it was.

 

(Original review posted on A Library Girl's Familiar Diversions.)

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-10-11 01:25
Reading progress update: I've listened 332 out of 332 minutes.
We Have Always Lived in the Castle: Acting Edition - Shirley Jackson

This was upsetting. I thought this was better, in a lot of ways, than The Haunting of Hill House, but I don't know that I'd ever want to re-listen to/re-read it. And I just realized that I never did get my biggest questions answered.

 

Edit: Oh, and I need to pick a Halloween Bingo square for this. I'm going to go with 13. I don't know if Jonas was ever described, but on the cover he's a black cat.

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?