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text 2018-05-24 21:06
Works on BookLikes - an update

 

Hey all readers, authors, publishers, avid readers, all book lovers!

 

Just wanted to confirm that the IT works on BookLikes will continue, however, they should not affect your BookLikes experience.

 

If you still encounter the difficulties on our site it maybe because your browser does not recognize the updates we've been doing. Please do consider clearing your browser's cache memory. 

 

If clearing the cookies won't change your BookLikes experience, please feel free to let us know, mail Kate@booklikes.com . You can mail Kate with any other queries as well :)

 

Happy reading and BookLiking! 

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text 2018-05-17 12:16
Reading progress update: I've read 236 out of 320 pages.
A is for Arsenic: The Poisons of Agatha Christie - Kathryn Harkup

Phosphorus and Ricin -- two particularly nasty ones.  And the way she's describing the discovery of phosphorus, it sounds like something straight out of a sorcerer's lab ... byproduct of the search for the philosophers' stone.  Why stop at gold, anyway?!

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text 2018-05-14 12:58
Reading progress update: I've read 202 out of 320 pages.
A is for Arsenic: The Poisons of Agatha Christie - Kathryn Harkup

What does it say that I read the opium chapter this night, after having woken up at 4:00AM (against all habit)?

 

I can see the temptation in using Sad Cypress as the anchor book for this chapter, and I'm glad Harkup gave an unambiguous spoiler warning this time around before proceeding to give away the final twist, in order to be able to address a compound that Christie uses in this novel (and which she only mentions by name in Poirot's final round-up of the suspects).  Still, it's not like this is the only book by Christie where morphine plays a prominent role, and Harkup would have been able to do without a spoiler completely by choosing, say, By the Pricking of My Thumbs (which was likely inspired by one of the real life cases Harkup addresses anyway), discuss morphine, heroin / diamorphine and codeine exactly the way she does here, and then, without specifically identifying Sad Cypress, tag on a paragraph beginning with "In another book, the poisoner ..." -- and then proceed to describing the solution of Sad Cypress.  Ah, well.  But, as I said, at least this time around there's a clear spoiler warning ... which should absolutely be heeded by anybody who hasn't read Sad Cypress yet.

 

Notes on the previous chapters:

 

I'm now wondering whether the murderer in Ellis Peters's Monk's Hood would really have made it all the way to being found out by Brother Cadfael, a considerable time after the murder, without suffering the slightest effects of the drug himself.

 

And while I thought I couldn't possibly be more scared of both nicotine and opiates than I already am anyway, just reading about the chemistry involved all over again was a not-very-much-needed refresher of just how scary these really are.  And, um, why kicking the habit (smoking) once and for all some 20 years ago was definitely the right thing to do.

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text 2018-05-10 13:09
Reading progress update: I've read 140 out of 320 pages.
A is for Arsenic: The Poisons of Agatha Christie - Kathryn Harkup

Oh, FIE.  Major spoiler alert.

 

In the "Hemlock" chapter, Harkup gives away -- without any prior warning whatsoever -- the identity of not one but two of the key suspects in Five Little Pigs who ultimately turn out to be innocent, and she also reveals the answer to the question that Poirot is chiefly asked to resolve.  This concerns persons whom Christie builds up as particularly "promising" suspects with great skill throughout the novel, with many clues pointing in their direction, and the revelation that they are innocent (and how the clues pointing to them are actually red herrings, and what they really mean) is a key part of Poirot's eventual summing up.  Even worse, knowing that -- and why -- these two persons didn't do it, and what the clues pointing to them actually mean, opens up direct lines of reasoning pointing to the true killer (whom Harkup doesn't reveal, but who is fairly easy to identify once you start questioning / rethinking those clues -- or at the very least, Harkup's hints also help eliminate other suspects).

 

If you haven't read Five Little Pigs yet, I strongly suggest you don't read the Hemlock chapter of Harkup's book until after you've read the novel.  For all I can see so far, there are no cross-references to this chapter with other parts of A Is For Arsenic, so it's not like you're missing anything that you need to know to be able to follow the rest.

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