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review 2018-09-15 08:47
When Marnie was There - Review
When Marnie Was There - Joan G. Robinson

The anime pretty much follows the book until the ending, which cuts out the part with the Linsdays.

Yes Marnie and Anna say they love each other. So that whole "queer baiting" thing is in the book too if you want to call it that. It's pretty much that Marnie was forced to marry Edward and then had kids.

 

Overall the book is pretty good if you like slice of life type books were not much happens and there's no super magic stuff going on.

I felt the part with the Lindsays was drawn out a bit much. They are mostly there to get you hyped for the big reveal of who Marnie was.

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text 2018-09-03 20:44
Reading progress update: I've read 146 out of 288 pages.
When Marnie Was There - Joan G. Robinson

So I had a friend that said that "When Marnie Was There" (the anime movie from Studio Ghibli) was "queer baiting" as in the anime Anna and Marnie both say that they love each over and over and "that wasn't in the book!" She insisted that she had read the book many times.

 

Only... reading the book myself there are quite a few time that Anna says she loves Marnie, even one point where she puts her cheek next to Marnie's. Yes they use the word "love" and not just implying it.

 

So.. yeah, turns out she DIDN'T read the book. Not surprising.

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review SPOILER ALERT! 2018-08-22 19:29
Caedmon's Song (Robinson)
Caedmon's Song - Peter Robinson

According to his afterword, this non-Banks story from Peter Robinson, though published in 2003, was written in the late '80s (it's copyrighted 1990), and he made a conscious choice not to try to update it into the internet age. The 1980s setting is, in fact, one of its selling points for me; I have a curious nostalgia for the days when it was the norm to be unhooked from the rest of the world, and operating purely independently and often in the absence of definite information on any number of minor topics. It was actually possible not only to get lost, but to be lost to other people.

 

This is a two-stream narrative, both in the third person but very much focused on a single point of view, and both tracking a young woman. It becomes evident early on to an attentive reader that both streams are about the same person; what is unresolved until a little later is just how close in time the two narratives are, one detailing a horrifyingly traumatic sexual assault just barely short of murder by an established serial killer, and the other telling about the cascading ethical (and physical) horrors of seeking revenge. Unlike a detective novel, this one does not concern itself with the legal consequences of the three murders that the protagonist commits on that journey. In some ways, having found ourselves in her head all through the novel, that's a bit of relief. We get to decide for ourselves (or fail to decide) what justice might look like in the horrifyingly unjust world in which Kirsten first finds herself, and to which Martha and Sue eventually contribute. (The multiple names refer simply to successive disguises the woman takes on during her journey of revenge, not to multiple personalities in the "Sybil" sense, but certainly there is a resonance with that general notion of the traumatized fractured self).

 

I have seen mixed reactions to this novel on the review sites, partly attributable (of course) to that bane of series novelists, frustrated expectations, but partly with reasoned criticisms of what was in fact a first work, though not first published. Myself, I liked it very much, enough to give it my standard Robinson four stars. It already shows some of the strengths that make his mature work so compulsively readable: psychological complexity, a keen eye and ear for the details of the world, and a solid grasp of narrative progression and structure.

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review 2018-08-20 01:09
Sheer: A Hollywood Romance (Exposed Book 3) by Sarah Robinson
Sheer: A Hollywood Romance - Sarah Robinson

 

Wounded hearts get a chance to heal. Robinson takes the broken and makes them whole. The beauty of the Exposed series is that images can be deceiving. There's drama under the surface waiting to bubble over. It's how the people handle the fallout that makes the stories so intriguing. Sheer is the beginning of the end for an unforgettable series. As Grant and Simone find their way in the industry of bright lights and heartache, each tackles hard knocks in their personal lives and insecurities in their professional ones. The fault in our stars is that we all have flaws. It's the lessons we learn and the peace we find from working through them, that helps us become who we're meant to be. Gritty, sensitive and inspiring tale.

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review SPOILER ALERT! 2018-08-16 06:00
The Revolution of Jack Frost by K M Robinson
The Revolution Of Jack Frost - K.M. Robinson

TITLE:  The Revolution of Jack Frost
 

AUTHOR:   K M Robinson

 

EXPECTED PUBLICATION DATE:       

6 November 2018

 

FORMAT: ARC ebook

 

ISBN-13:  9781948583077

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NOTE: I received a copy of this book from NetGalley. This review is my honest opinion of the book.

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Book Description:

    "No one inside the snow globe knows that Morozoko Industries is controlling their weather, testing them to form a stronger race that can survive the fall out from the bombs being dropped in the outside world—all they know is that they must survive the harsh Winter that lasts a month and use the few days of Spring, Summer, and Fall to gather enough supplies to survive.

    When the seasons start shifting, Genesis and her boyfriend, Jack, know something has gone wrong. As their team begins to find technology that they don’t have access to inside their snow globe of a world, it looks more and more like one of their own is working against them.

    Genesis soon discovers Morozoko Industries is to blame, but when a foreign enemy tries to destroy their weather program to make sure their destructive life-altering bombs succeed in destroying the outside world, their only chance is to  shut down the machine that is spinning out of control and save the lives of everyone inside the bunker--at any cost."

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This is something of a light dystopian/science fiction novel written in a simple style that young teenagers might find appealing.  The concept was interesting enough, but the execution fell a bit flat.  There were far too many mild romance scenes inserted randomly throughout that detracted from the story.  There were also too many unanswere questions or missed opportunities for extended world building.  The characters also have done with a bit more personality and conflict - especially the group of secondary characters.  They came across as docile sheep, following whatever instructions are given without question and not even twitching when they find out their world wasn't what they thought it was.   The writing of the first half of the novel was a bit stilted, almost like a novice writer.  The second half picked up pace and intensity.  This wasn't a bad book, but it could have been better.

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