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review 2017-04-17 18:11
Kidneapped At Christmas, Maggie K. Black
Kidnapped at Christmas (True North Bodyg... Kidnapped at Christmas (True North Bodyguards) - Maggie K. Black

I really enjoyed this romantic suspense. I received this book for free and I voluntarily chose to review it. I've given this a 5* rating. This book pulled me in from the start and held me till the end. I was up to 4 this morning to finish this. Lots of messed up characters in this to keep you guessing and lots of action to keep you turning those pages.

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review 2017-04-13 10:28
Grief, survivor’s guilt, identity and family relations in a beautifully written book set in Guatemala.
Petals - Laurisa White Reyes

I’m writing this review as part of a blog tour for this novel that I voluntarily agreed to participate in.

From the author’s note, it is clear that this book is a labour of love that has been many years in the coming. This is the first novel by Larisa White Reyes I had read and it is unlikely to be the last one.

The story is told in the first person by Carly Perez, a young girl (almost eighteen) who lost her mother last Christmas Even in a car accident. She was also in the car when it happened and it has taken her a long time to recover, both physically and mentally. We soon realise how precarious this recovery is. Her father, who is originally from Guatemala, insists on going there to visit his family for Christmas and Carly is less than happy. She doesn’t know them, as her father hasn’t visited in the last twenty years, she hardly speaks any Spanish, and a year after her mother’s death, the last thing she wants is to spend time in an unfamiliar (and to her mind backwards and wild) place with a bunch of strangers. Her preconceived ideas of the country and her family will be put to the test and her precarious mental equilibrium will be stretched to the very limit.

Carly is a typical adolescent in some ways, but also an extremely sensitive soul. She is moody because she has to go to Guatemala, instead of staying in California, she argues with her father, she disobeys his rules and gives him the silent treatment at times. She can be grumpy and quick to judge, both the country and her relatives, and she does not know what to think about Miguel, her step-cousin, the only one close to her age and experiences but also reluctant to engage and talk about his problems. Carly is an artist, although she’s had difficulty painting since her mother’s death, and she keeps being tormented by strange dreams, and by the recurrent appearance of a weird man, wrinkled and scarred, who keeps nagging at her subconscious. She is terrified of him but can’t recall where she saw him before. She’s convinced he has come to confront her with something, but she does not know why or what. The combination of her disturbing experiences and the new environment manages to make her remember something that had been hiding inside of her mind, masked by the grief and the medication.

The author excels at showing Carly’s point of view, and how her opinion evolves from indifference and disdain towards her relatives and the country to curiosity and eventually affection and love. One of the reasons why I decided to read the book was because I was intrigued about how a girl brought up in California would adjust to a new family and a completely different environment. The description of Guatemala, the city of Reu, the Mayan temples, Xela … paint a vivid picture of the country, its traditions (including those related to Christmas, religious and otherwise), its food and its people. We get to meet the more traditional older generation (her grandfather, caring and congenial, and her grandmother, always cooking and comforting), her aunt Dora, who also left the country and lived in New York for many years, and Miguel, the youngest one, who was born in the USA and who, although initially reluctant, ends up becoming the closest to her. They share not only age but also similar identity problems, and he’s dark and handsome too, so it’s not surprising that things develop to Carly’s surprise.

There is clean romance, there are some interesting discussions about identity, family, and what makes us who we are (and how difficult it might be to fit in when perhaps you don’t belong anywhere), and also about life, death, guilt and forgiveness. There are very emotional moments, fun and magical ones, and sad ones. Although the discovery Carly makes towards the end wasn’t a big surprise for me, the beauty is in the detail, the visual symbols (the snow, the petals of the title, the man …), the way all the pieces come together, and the final message is one of hope, forgiveness and reconciliation.

In summary, this is an excellent YA book, well written, with beautiful description of places, people and emotions, exploring issues of identity, survivor’s guilt, grief and death, mixed marriages and families, the role of tradition and culture, with an engaging and sympathetic main character and a good cast of secondary ones. This is a clean book with some Christian religious content and questions although that is not the emphasis of the book. It will appeal not only to readers of YA books but to anybody who enjoys well-written first-person narratives, exploring mixed family relationships, identity and grief, set in a wonderful location.

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review 2017-04-08 05:23
How the Grinch Stole Christmas - Listening Library,Walter Matthau,Dr. Seuss

How the Grinch Stole Christmas by Dr. Suess is one of my favorite books I've ever read. Although its very simple, It's so fun and has a great moral behind it so of course i would recommend reading it in the classrooms. The book is about the mean ole Grinch in Whoville who tries to put a stop to Christmas. Cindy Lou Who teaches the town and the Grinch that Christmas is't just about at the presents of the material things. Christmas is about being together and the things that don;t come wrapped in perfect little bows or cost a lot of money. Family and the people you are with mean the most. I would rate this book a five out of five and it is listed as a on the Lexile scale as a 510L. An activity I would get my students to do would be to complete a story map of the book. I would then want for them to illustrate the events of the story they have included in their map.

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review 2017-04-08 03:05
How the Grinch Stole Christmas! - Dr. Seuss

This is one of my favorite stories ever; it cracks me up every time! The Grinch hates Christmas and plans to “steal” the holiday from the Whos. He pretends to be Santa and steals everyone’s presents and decorations. After the fact, the Whos all still find a way to celebrate, because they know that the true meaning of Christmas is not about the presents or decorations. When the Grinch sees this, he realizes that he misunderstood what Christmas is truly about.

 

 

In the classroom, this would be a great Christmas time read. Students could be reminded that the true meaning of Christmas (and other holidays) is about family and being together, not about presents.

 

 

  • Lexile Measure:510L
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review 2017-04-08 00:00
Twins For Christmas
Twins For Christmas - Jen A. Durand Twins for Christmas packs a boatload of drama in such a short lovable package. Ms. Durand delivers a story of betrayal, heartache and secrets. What began with such promise ended in despair for Malcolm and Rhea. Now, three years later, Malcolm wants a second chance. Can Rhea find it in her heart to give him one? Twins for Christmas is simply good storytelling. The author mixes common sense with age old wisdom and delivers that classic Christmas feeling of forgiveness and hope.
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