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review 2018-06-13 07:11
Misunderstanding
On a Tuesday - Whitney G.

This is a great story about a second chance for Charlotte and Grayson.  They met in college and had their life ahead of them.  She to be a lawyer, he to be in professional football.  When they come across one another later - fireworks!

 

Grayson had always intended to be with Charlotte.  He lost her and did not know where she was.  With seven years wasted, he does not want to miss another minute.  Convincing her to give him another shot?  Priceless.

 

This book was full of so many precious moments.  I loved the banter, sexy times, heat level, pace, etc.  I was so pleased I picked this one up.  This author is amazing.  I give this story a 4/5 Kitty's Paws UP!

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text 2018-05-21 12:15
Audiotour - Thirty Day Boyfriend

 

Thirty Day Boyfriend

by Whitney G.

Publication Date: November 2, 2017

Genres: Adult, Contemporary, Romance

 

 

Purchase: Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Kobo | iBooks | Audible | iTunes

 

I should've never agreed to this arrangement...

 

Thirty days ago, my boss--Mr. Wolf of Wall Street, came to me with an offer I couldn't refuse: Sign my name on the dotted line and pretend to be his fiancée for one month. If I agreed, he would let me out of my employment contract with a "very generous" severance package. The rules were pretty simple: No intimate kissing, no actual sex. Just pretend to love each other for the press, even though I've secretly wanted to knock that sexy smirk off his face since the first day we met. I definitely didn't need to think twice about this. I signed my name and started counting down the seconds to when I would never have to deal with his special brand of ass-holery again.

 

I only made it to one minute...

 

We argued the entire four-hour flight to his hometown, failed to make a convincing impression with the welcoming press, and right when I was about to knock that arrogant look off his face in real life? He purposely dropped his bath towel in front of me, distracting me with his nine-inch cock to "show me who the bigger person was" in our relationship. Then he gave me his trademark smirk once again and asked if I wanted to consummate our marriage. Tragically, this is only day one. We still have 29 more days to go...

 

 

 

 

Thirty Day BoyfriendThirty Day Boyfriend by Whitney G.
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Emily has had all she take of her job and her boss. Then he proposed a whole new deal. With all that is at stake, can she really last thirty days?

Nicholas fights his attraction to his assistant every day. Following her second anniversary with his company, he asks Emily to do him a favor. If they can get along for one month, maybe that will be all it takes.

The voices provided by Erin Mallon & Zachary Webber were just really good to listen to. I think it was a great combination, and the inflections and tones added to the story. I really hope I get to hear them in another book. This story with these voices was just magic.

This was such a fun and sexy story. There was heat, terrific banter, and a trope that any serious romance reader can get behind. I laughed and enjoyed listening to this book right to the end.


***This copy was given in exchange for an honest review only.

View all my reviews

 

 

 

About Whitney G.:

 

Whitney G. is a twenty-eight-year-old optimist who is obsessed with travel, tea, and great coffee. She’s also a New York Times & USA Today bestselling author of several contemporary novels, and the cofounder of The Indie Tea–an inspirational blog for indie romance authors.

 

When she’s not chatting with readers on her Facebook Page, you can find her on her website at http://www.whitneygbooks.com or on instagram: @whitneyg.author. (If she’s not in either of those places, she’s probably locked away working on another crazy story.)

Don’t forget to sign up for Whitney’s monthly newsletter here: http://bit.ly/1p9fEYF

 

 

 

a Rafflecopter giveaway

 

 

 

 

 

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review 2018-05-21 07:37
Sexy
Thirty Day Boyfriend - Phyllis A. Whitney

Emily has had all she take of her job and her boss.  Then he proposed a whole new deal.  With all that is at stake, can she really last thirty days?

 

Nicholas fights his attraction to his assistant every day.  Following her second anniversary with his company, he asks Emily to do him a favor.  If they can get along for one month, maybe that will be all it takes.

 

The voices provided by Erin Mallon & Zachary Webber were just really good to listen to.  I think it was a great combination, and the inflections and tones added to the story.  I really hope I get to hear them in another book.  This story with these voices was just magic.

 

This was such a fun and sexy story.  There was heat, terrific banter, and a trope that any serious romance reader can get behind.  I laughed and enjoyed listening to this book right to the end.  I give this audiobook a 5/5 Kitty's Paws UP!

 

 

***This copy was given in exchange for an honest review only.

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review 2018-04-24 00:23
Hysterical
Sincerely, Carter - Whitney Gracia Williams

Sincerely, Carter is a fabulous contemporary romance by Whitney Gracia Williams.  Ms. Williams has delivered a book that is well-written and loaded with amazing characters.  The only thing I didn't care for about this book is the alternating first-person point of view format.  Carter and Arizona have been best friends since childhood.  Their story is laugh-out-loud funny with plenty of drama and sizzle thrown in.  I enjoyed this book from cover to cover and would gladly read more from Whitney Gracia Williams in the future. Sincerely, Carter is book 1 of the Sincerely, Carter Series but can be read as a standalone.  This is a complete book, not a cliff-hanger. 

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review 2018-04-02 14:14
The man who introduced America to mass production
Eli Whitney and the Birth of American Technology (Library of American Biography Series) - Constance McL. Green,Oscar Handlin

Eli Whitney ranks as one of the great inventors of American history.  Associated in innumerable textbooks with the cotton gin that he developed, his contribution to the development of the American economy extended far beyond this simple device.  Constance McL. Green explains his impact on our history in this brief biography, one that serves both as a study of his life and of the evolution of early American industry.

 

Whitney displayed his mechanical aptitude from an early age.  Growing up in colonial Massachusetts, he preferred tinkering in his father’s workshop to his various chores on the family farm.  Though his family was middle class by the standards of the age, his request to go to college was nonetheless a considerable burden on the family finances, though one to which his father assented.  Whitney attended Yale, which Green sees as a decision with critical consequences, as his subsequent career would be greatly aided by his fellow alumni.

 

After his graduation in 1792, Whitney’s acceptance of an tutoring position brought him to Georgia, where he made the acquaintance of the remarkable Catherine Greene, the widow of General Nathaniel Greene.  It was while he was staying at her plantation that he set himself to solving one of the most perplexing problems the South faced – how to process green-seed cotton cheaply.  Here the author provides a valuable context, explaining the new nation’s economic straits in the aftermath of the American Revolution.  With America now cut off from most British markets and with her industry undeveloped, many believed that the solution was to develop a new staple product to export.  The Industrial Revolution was stimulating a growing demand for raw cotton for the new machines to weave into cloth, but the green seeds of the dominant American variety were prohibitively difficult to separate from the fibers.

 

Eli Whitney solved this problem by building a machine the separated the seeds from the fiber easily.  His new device, the cotton gin, was quickly seen as the revolutionary device it was, energizing the economy of a region that until then was bereft of a role.  Filing a patent for it, he went into business with Greene’s plantation manager, Phineas Miller.  Their plan to gin cotton for 2/5 of the crop soon encountered hostility from numerous Southern cotton growers, however, who preferred to copy the gin and do it themselves.  The subsequent legal battles dragged on for another decade, and resulted in judgements that brought in only a fraction of the money Whitney and Miller had hoped to make.

 

Yet Whitney’s efforts on the cotton gin were to lead to an even more revolutionary innovation.  To produce the number of machines believed his company would need, Whitney developed a standardized production process, one which he soon sought to apply to the production of muskets.  After his struggles with marketing the cotton gin, Whitney turned to musket manufacturing as an endeavor that ensured a guaranteed income through federal contracts.  His promise to deliver thousands of muskets rested not on a new design of the weapon, but on the application of his “uniformity system” to their production.  This, as Green notes, was Whitney’s “unique contribution to American industrial development . . his execution of a carefully-thought-out system, of which every separate type of machine was a part.”  Such a system offset the shortage of labor plaguing the young nation, and permanently transformed both American manufacturing and the American economy.

 

Green’s book is a good examination of both the man and his legacy.  Drawing upon a range of materials, it describes his inventions and his business activities in a clear and accessible manner.  More than just a portrait of Whitney, it is a study of a pivotal moment in the history of the American economy and in the development of American technology, with lessons and insights that are as applicable today as they were in his age.

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