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text 2018-04-17 02:57
Dewey's and Caldecott

It's a bit over a week until Dewey's 24-Hour Readathon on Saturday, APRIL 28, 2018.

 

 

Reader Sign-ups are open:

http://www.24hourreadathon.com/april-2018-reader-sign-ups/

 

There are over 700 people signed up already.

 

I've made a tradition of reading the  2018 Caldecott Award winner and some of the Caledcott Honor books as a change of pace between novels during the Spring Deweys.  You can find the winners of the Caldecott, Newbery and other awards from http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2018/02/american-library-association-announces-2018-youth-media-award-winners 

 

This is nicely compatible with the low-key Readathon I'm planning, since there is also a visiting scholar at my synagogue and the local Earth-Day celebration competing for my attention.  I don't expect I'll actually read much, since I'd rather spend my time social media-hopping and cheering others on.

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review 2018-02-23 12:43
Duck for President
Duck for President - Doreen Cronin,Betsy Lewin

This book does an excellent job at educating readers on the process of nominating and electing a person in office. It also gives a little background on the responsibility of the President. I think using animals instead of people will grab the attention of younger students better. It's much more fun that way. I like that the duck starts out at a position of no power and slowly climbs the political ladder all the way to presidency. I would use this book to introduce the election process and have a mock election, rather it be during the presidential election or a classroom election.  

  

Lexile Measure: AD680L

 

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review 2018-01-23 20:12
Bud, Not Buddy
Bud, Not Buddy - Christopher Paul Curtis

This is a heart-warming story about a child that lost his mother and unknowingly mistaken about who his father is. He has lived in an orphanage and has been in and out of several foster homes. He runs away with a small case of the only few possessions he has in a search to find the man that he believes to be his father. I would use this book to work on making inferences and discuss how sometimes if there are not enough clues or facts those inferences can turn out to be something completely different then what we thought.

 

Accelerated Reader Level: 5.0

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review 2018-01-23 14:22
Helliconia Spring: The First Book in the Helliconia Trilogy (Helliconia Trilogy, Book 1) - Brian W. Aldiss

The central character in this book is the planet Helliconia. The story shows how the primitive civilizations and flora and fauna are influenced by planetary forces with seasons that last thousands of years. Readers must keep in mind that this book is the start of a trilogy or they will not like the ending.

All in all it is a good start and makes me want to read the next book in the trilogy.

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review 2017-12-19 02:39
A cute little book with some important hurricane safety lessons for kids
Elephant Wind (Mom's Choice Award Winner) - Heather L Beal

So the day care is having a field trip to a science fair and the local tornado siren goes off, the teacher rushes the kids to the shelter and then starts answering questions for the frightened kids. She calms them, tells them what's going on and how they (and their parents) can stay safe in the middle of a tornado. It's a great way to respond to a time like this and a great way to lure in the readers so they will absorb the same lessons.

 

Now, I'm not convinced that you're going to get kids living in an area that has the tornado shelters and sirens, etc. that are that old and not have some clue about what's going on (sure, maybe a couple of people who've just moved into the area, but not that many) -- but this book isn't trying to go for accuracy, it's trying to teach something. Like, say, about tornado shelters and sirens to kids so they know what they are before being taken to a shelter by their day care teacher. Basically, sure, it's a plot problem, but this book doesn't care about things like that.

 

Storywise, it's just different enough from Tummy Rumble Quake (well, this was actually published first, I guess, but I read them in this order. Still, technically, Tummy Rumble Quake is just different enough from this), which is a pretty tricky thing to pull off, but will keep some kids from tuning out -- it's not just a case of "here we go again." The ways to stay safe are clear, and will help minimize the fearfulness of the situation.

Again, on behalf of parents with little musical ability, some tips on how to sing this mnemonic song (a tune suggestion, perhaps), would be very helpful and welcome. The inclusion of the song is a great idea.

 

Sager's art did the job -- good use of colors and details, without overwhelming the reader and distracting them from the text. The tornado-elephant mashup pictures were an inspired choice -- one suggested by the text, no doubt, but the execution was spot-on.

A wonderful idea and I'm pretty sure a great help for those in areas where this is a lesson to be taught. I'd encourage parents and others to grab this one, too.

 

Disclaimer: I received this book from the author in exchange for this post and my honest opinion.

Source: irresponsiblereader.com/2017/12/18/elephant-wind-by-heather-l-beal-jubayda-sager
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