logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: biotechnology
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
text 2018-08-27 10:24
Molecular Diagnostics Market Outlook, Price Trends and Application Analysis, 2016 to 2024

The Molecular Diagnostics Market was valued at over USD 6.40 billion in 2015. It is likely to grow at a CAGR of around 9% during the forecast period (2016-2024).

 

Increasing prevalence of infectious diseases, cancer, genetic disorders, and other contagious disease are likely to drive the molecular diagnostics industry. Hospital acquired infections and other communicable infections are expected to boost market growth in the coming eight years. Moreover, prenatal genetic testing is also expected to increase the adoption of this diagnostics.

 

Unhealthy lifestyle can further contribute to large number of people getting afflicted with chronic ailments like cardiovascular disorders and diabetes. This with further propel market growth in the coming years. Molecular diagnostics market is divided into products, technologies, applications, test location, and regions.

 

Browse Details of Report @ https://www.hexaresearch.com/research-report/molecular-diagnostics-industry

 

On the basis of products, the market is split into instruments, reagents, and others. Reagents segment held the largest share in 2015 with revenues exceeding USD 3.5 billion. It is expected to grow at a CAGR surpasing 12%. Instruments segment is expected to show a significant growth in the coming years.

 

Technologies consist of polymerase chain reaction (PCR), in-situ hybridization, chips and microarrays, mass spectrometery, DNA sequencing, transportation mediated amplification, and others. PCR held the largest market share of over USD 2.5 billion in 2015. Growth of this segment can be attributed to its high incorporation among the researchers and healthcare professionals. DNA sequencing is likely to show a growth of about 16% CAGR in the coming years.

 

Applications encompass oncology, pharmacogenomics, infectious diseases, genetic testing, neurological diseases, cardiovascular diseases, and others. Infectious diseases segment was the largest application holding market share exceeding 45% in 2015.

 

Oncology segment is anticipated to show a CAGR of about 13% till 2024. Rising awareness among people regarding early cancer diagnosis is the key aspect propelling market growth of the segment.

 

Test location comprises of point of care (PoC), self test or over the counter (OTC), and central laboratories. Central laboratories dominated the market with over 60% shares in 2015. The growth of the central laboratories can be attributed to their large prominence in underdeveloped countries, rising awareness about early detection of diseases, and high procedure volumes.

 

The PoC is expected to project a lucrative growth with a CAGR of more than 14%. The growth of this segment can be attributed to the increasing demand of bedside patient monitoring and innovative technological devices.

 

Regions are fragmented into North America, Latin America, Europe, Asia Pacific, and the Middle East & Africa (MEA). America dominated the market with over 40% revenue share. Asia Pacific is likely to exhibit a growth of around 12%CAGR in the coming years.

 

The key global players of the molecular diagnostics market include Siemens Healthcare GmbH, Novartis AG (Grifols), F. Hoffmann-La Roche Limited, and Johnson & Johnson.

 

Browse Related Category Market Reports @ https://www.hexaresearch.com/research-category/biotechnology-industry  

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-11-13 06:59
How to Build a Dinosaur by Jack Horner & James Gorman
How to Build a Dinosaur: The New Science of Reverse Evolution - Jack Horner,James Gorman

TITLE:  How to Build a Dinosaur:  Extinction Doesn't Have to Be Forever

 

AUTHOR:  Jack Horner & James Gorman

 

DATE PUBLISHED:  2009

 

FORMAT:  ebook

 

ISBN-13:  978-1-101-02871-1

 

____________________________________

 

This is a horribly written book. There is a ridiculous amount of completely irrelevant filler, a few interesting dinosaur bits and pieces that have nothing to do with the book title (and presumably subject) and then a magazine article length section on "how to build a dinosaur" by fiddling with chicken genomes, along with how the general public is going to freak out about it. The author spends the entire first chapter babbling about a town in the middle of nowhere, how to get there, local gossip and a bit of local history i.e. irrelevant filler. Then there is a section on finding evidence of dinosaur blood cells and collagen, with some pointless pot-shots at creationists (they might be crazy but do you really have to include it in the book, especially since it doesn't accomplish anything?), and too much details about the scientists personal life. The sections dealing with the techniques used was interesting, but there was too little substance and far too much filler. The writing is also simplistic but overly verbose, and got boring after a while.

 

NOTE: The book was published in 2009, so some of the scientific data discussed may well be out of date by now, especially anything related to genetic alterations.

 

 

INTERESTING ARTICLE (2015)

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review SPOILER ALERT! 2017-11-03 07:21
Bring Back the King by Helen Pilcher
Bring Back the King: The New Science of De-extinction - Helen Pilcher

TITLE:  Bring Back the King:  The New Science of De-Extinction

 

AUTHOR:  Helen Pilcher

 

PUBLICATION DATE:  2016

 

FORMAT:  ebook

 

ISBN-13:   978-1-4729-1228-2

 

_______________________

 

 

In this book, Helen Pilcher takes an introductory look at the science of de-extinction, covering such topics as the de-extinction of dinosaurs, neanderthals, mammoths, a variety of extinct birds, the thylacine, Elvis Presley, as well as some other random questions, ethics and concerns.

 

The book reads more like a collection of excessively padded magazine articles stuffed into one package. There is also an excessive amount of "cutsie" humour (also bad jokes) in this book which simply falls flat; as well as too many personal intrusions from the author. The discussions of the actual de-extinction science are uneven - some animals are lucky enough to get their situation and the science explained in a fair amount of detail, others will get an over-simplified explanation. The ethics, challenges and if the whole things is a good idea is glossed over in one chapter.

 

For example:
The majority of the chapter on Neanderthals involves too much author speculation and personal emotion in her speculative story of a neanderthal baby. The chapter on Elvis is just silly and self-indulgent. Pilcher could have found a better way to discuss general genetics and epigenetics, and she oversimplifies what she does write about the topic. The chapter about the white rhino gastric brooding frog are informative, and better written than the others.

 

This book is easy to read, funny (to other people) and would probably make a good introduction to the subject for people who aren't too particular about the amount of hard science in their popular science books. Teenagers might like it too.

 

Otherwise, there are a selection of other books on the same topic that are better written:

 

-Resurrection Science: Conservation, De-extinction and the Precarious Future of Wild Things by M.R. O'Connor [Deals more with the conservation angle]

 

-How to Clone a Mammoth: The Science of De-Extinction by Beth Shapiro [Includes more physical science involved in de-extinction and all the ethics and possibilities]

 

-Rise of the Necrofauna: A Provocative Look at the Science, Ethics, and Risks of De-Extinction by Britt Wray [Focus on the ethics, risks and possibilities of de-extinction science]


- How to Build a Dinosaur: The New Science of Reverse Evolution by Jack Horner & James Gorman

 

 

For those interested in epigenetics:

 

-The Epigenetics Revolution by Nessa Carey

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-10-27 15:09
Rise of the Necrofauna by Britt Wray
Rise of the Necrofauna: The Science, Ethics, and Risks of De-Extinction - Britt Wray

 

TITLE:  Rise of the Necrofauna:  The Science, Ethics, and Risks of De-Extinction

 

AUTHOR:  Britt Wray

 

DATE PUBLISHED:  September 2017

 

FORMAT: epub

 

ISBN-13:  978-1-77164-163-0

 

_______________________________

 

 

Rise of the Necrofauna is a wonderfully clearly written, enjoyable, extremely interesting, informative and engaging book that takes a broad look at the science, uses, ethics, and risks of de-extinction technology and organisms. Britt Wray provides a nice summary of the current status of the handful of de-extinction projects currently in existence, as well as providing interesting interviews with the scientists currently involved in these projects.

 

Chapter one provides a summary of the scientific methods involved in the various de-extinction efforts.  I would have preferred more details of the actual methods involved, such as is covered in How to Clone a Mammoth by Beth Shapiro.  However, what the author does write about the science involved is clear and easily understandable. 

 

The remainder of the book covers topics on the ethics and uses of this technology, such as: why de-extinction is important; what species are good contenders and why; woolly mammoths and passenger pigeons; possible regulations for de-extinct species; uses of this technology in conservation efforts; and the risks involved.  A great many perspectives are investigated, but what is interesting is that the majority of scientific techniques developed for de-extinction projects has helped other scientific fields as well, and that their may be more than one way to bring back an extinct species or help an endangered species.

 

Most of the information and examples covered in this book is discussed (in one way or another) in How to Clone a Mammoth by Beth Shapiro, however, this book is better written even though it doesn't emphasize the science as much.  So, if you have read How to Clone a Mammoth you will probably not gain much more information from this book.  On the other hand, this is a lovely introduction to the concept and reality of de-extinction and its possibilities.

 

 

Other Recommended Books:

 

-Resurrection Science:  Conservation, De-Extinction and the Precarious Future of Wild Things by M.R. O'Connor  (well written book that deals more with using de-extinction techniques in conservation efforts).

 

-How to Clone a Mammoth:  The Science of De-Extinction by Beth Shapiro (includes more about the actual science methods involved)

 

-Once & Future Giants: What Ice Age Extinctions Tell Us about the Fate of Earth's Largest Animals by Sharon Levy  (on rewilding)

 

-Where the Wild Things Were: Life, Death, and Ecological Wreckage in a Land of Vanishing Predators by William Stolzenburg (on rewilding)

 

Interesting Websites

  

http://all-that-is-interesting.com/de-extinction#1

  

http://reviverestore.org/

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review SPOILER ALERT! 2017-10-23 15:03
Glowing Fish & Bucketfuls of Spider Silk in Goat Milk, Frankenstein’s Cat by Emily Anthes Showcases Some of the Wonders of the Biotechnological World While also Raising Some Important Questions!
Frankenstein's Cat: Cuddling Up to Biotech's Brave New Beasts - Emily Anthes

 

 

 

The penultimate installment in Project Frankenstein was a joy to read. It was relatively short and full of stuff that I find interesting. I am dividing this review into three parts:

 

1. Here is a Snippet from the book:

 

 

2. Then there were these Sciency Bits that I enjoyed ruminating upon:

Cloning other adult mammals reinforced the discovery that nuclear transfer can reset genes contained in specialized cells back to their embryonic state.

It meant that the genetic clock could supposedly be turned back if things didn’t go so well the first time!

It is my content that the northern grasslands would have remained viable…had the great herds of Pleistocene animals remained in place to maintain the landscape.

This occurred to me for the first time. Yes, the Ice Ages may have changed the landscape physically but it also caused the extinction of the grazers and caused changes in a roundabout way.

…(tuna) are warm-blooded, which makes them oddities in the fish world but keeps them toasty…

They are what?! Why are you doing this to me world? I was so happy, thinking all fish are cold-blooded but no! I hate nature!

International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT)

While The Sixth Extinction left me without hope, this book helped me see that we aren’t all bad eggs. Yes, humans have brought the onset of Anthropocene and change environment wherever they go…

We have harvested so many of these large deer, elk, and sheep over the centuries that many species have evolved smaller body and horn sizes. Similarly, fish have adapted to human harvesting by developing thinner bodies capable of sneaking out of nets.

Yet, organizations like ICCAT are keeping track of the number of bluefin tuna that are being pulled out of water annually. The Integrated Ocean Observing System is tagging elephant seals and other swimmers to gather information about the marine environment. Then there is Ocean Tracking Network that has been busy installing underwater listening stations that will pick up on tagged animals. The list of scientists and researchers trying to collect information goes on and on. There is even an attempt to engage the public and increase awareness via animal Facebook profiles. The point is, it took us decades if not more to wreck things. We will need some time to put them back together and it is a pity if nature doesn’t grant us that respite.

 

3. And a Franken-Bit that I shook an admonitory finger at:

The manufacturers of AquAdvantage salmon think that by producing only sterile female fish, they can keep them from reproducing or passing along their genes.

 

 

Even though the book raises pertinent questions about whether animals can incur psychological damage from being tagged, it doesn’t answer them. To be fair, most of us won’t be able to say no to a drug, if it would save a loved one, even if one or two clauses of animal rights weren’t observed!

 

Could you?

 

Image

 

Originally published at midureads.wordpress.com on October 23, 2017.

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?