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review 2017-09-19 21:00
The Snow Child - Eowyn Ivey

I love fairy tales, and this one is no exception. I also appreciate that the wild, snowy Alaskan landscape is as much a character as the 50-year-old husband and wife who are the protagonists. Inspired by a Russian fairy tale, Ivey has done a lovely job of balancing the magical world with the very real difficulties and savagery of life in the high north. The images Ivey chooses work perfectly and the characters are all well-drawn, even the somewhat unearthly presence of the 'snow child' herself.

 

Like the best of fairy tales, this one is equal parts light and dark, and the transformations are complicated and at times disturbing. Thank goodness for that.

 

My only issue with the book, and what stopped me from giving it five stars, is that it's a tad too long. Well, more than a tad. There is a good deal of detail that might have been removed in favor of pacing. Still, I recommend it for anyone who has a soft spot for magical tales. I don't think you'll be disappointed.

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review 2017-09-05 08:07
Harriet The Spy by Louise Fitzhugh

I have read this again as an adult. The last couple times I was around Harriet's age. It is a lot different from what I remember, and I am highly influenced by what I remember in the movie as I've seen that several times in my adult years. I feel like it still holds up, but honestly maybe not a glowing 5 star rating. It isn't a perfect book by any means. I'm leaving it at 5 stars, because this book (and the movie) were very important to me when I read/saw them for the first time at age 12. I even kept a journal and thought I was a spy for a while.

As an adult, I can say that Harriet was a little bit of a bratty, spoiled child, but I hardly blame her, because of how she was raised.

I also want to say that if Janie was really her best friend, I don't believe she would have read her diary/journal, and should have gave it back to Harriet. None of the mess would have happened. Harriet could have apologized for hurting people's feelings, but I don't think she should have to lie, maybe little white lies. Her journal was her personal thoughts and something she really needed. There are people who believe she might have been on the autism spectrum and the journal was her grounding activity.

Also how Janie and Sport treated Harriet does not come off how a best friend would treat another friend, even if they were angry at each other. I might be able to believe the other classmates actions, because they were never that close to Harriet. Some people think Golly was a bad influence, but I don't think so. She encouraged Harriet's imagination and seemed like the only person who could truly understand her, but that is just my opinion.

 

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review 2017-09-02 17:49
Relic
Relic - Douglas Preston,Lincoln Child

It´s my second read of this book and it is still as fun as I remember. The perfect novel when you just want to read something fastpaced, actionpacked and suspenseful and you don´t want to use a lot of brainpower on the words you are reading. And to all of you who don´t like gore: there is a lot of it in this book.

 

The science is incredibly wacky (genetics in the 90s), but I loved the setting of the museum and the great characters, especially excentric Agent Pendergast and goodhearted, down-to-earth Lieutenant D´Agosta.

 

I didn´t like the epilogue, though, because it felt completely out of place and it has only been included to hint at a continuation of the story. I could easily have done without the epilogue.

 

I´ve read this for the monster square and trust me, there is a monster. I´m just not telling you what kind it is.

 

 

 

 

 

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text 2017-08-30 20:02
Reading progress update: I've read 1%.
Relic - Douglas Preston,Lincoln Child

Whittesley sat down on the fallen tree and pulled off his right boot and sock. Lighting a cigarette, he applied its tip to the forest of ticks on his shin and ankle.

 

Let the horror begin!

 

I´m kidding. No monstrous ticks in this book ;)

 

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text 2017-08-30 11:37
Wringo Ink. Short Story for the Genre “Starts with a Phrase”: Not. A. Story.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Once upon a time, sharks flew across the sky.

 

Or so one would think if one hadn’t been living in that era.

 

It was an age where people thought they had the right to punish people in God’s stead.

 

It was a time when it was okay to turn the sacred ground of universities into abattoirs.

 

It was just one of the moments in a string of moments when masks slipped off faces. With the carapace removed, you could see the hideousness underneath. The beings that had been masquerading around as animals were found to be much much worse. They might have been playacting to be civilized animals but the reality was abhorrently bad. When the masks were gone, we realized the torturers had been human.

 

Only the most unfortunate were alive at this instant in history. Could there be any doubt about their luckless nature if one looked at their accursed existence?

 

It was an epoch when nests were raided and the nestlings would never be safe. A false sense of optimism and security lay on the world like a thick heavy blanket. It seduced the birds to keep breeding, thinking their cygnets would be the only ones to be blessed. They never were; their fates had been anointed with humanity. There was no way those nestlings would remain unaffected.

 

It was a phase in human history when the Painbearers were taught their place. Untouched but still sullied, they plodded on. The chinks grew larger and each time, they glued the pieces back with hopelessness. Freedom was an illusion and the idea that they would ever be anything but the bearers of pain, a mirage.

 

It was an interval that had stopped being an interval a long time ago. It was like a pox-ridden Cronos but who refused to die.

 

In short, it was everyday o’clock.

 

Originally published at midureads.wordpress.com on August 30, 2017.

 
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