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review 2017-03-29 01:20
I would have been a runaway
Terms & Conditions: Life in Girls' Boarding-Schools, 1939-1979 (Slightly Foxed Editions) - Ysenda Maxtone-Graham

Terms & Conditions: Life in Girls' Boarding Schools, 1939-1979 by Ysenda Maxtone Graham is exactly what I was looking for this week. As the title suggests, this is a non-fiction book about what it was like to attend a boarding school for girls from the years of 1939-79 (in the United Kingdom obviously). The author conducted numerous interviews of women who attended these school who recalled startlingly vivid memories (both ill and pleasant) of their time there. From what it was like to be separated from family at a young age (some incredibly young) to the traumatic recollections of the horrible food they were forced to eat to what really went on when a bunch of hormonal girls were kept sequestered without any boys in sight this is a book that is both informative and interesting. (It's also super funny.) I've read some fanciful stories about what it's like to live in a boarding school but never true accounts from the girls themselves about what actually went on behind those austere facades. (Seriously a ton of them were in manor houses and castles which makes me super jealous.) There are many similarities between the institutions and also some gargantuan differences. For instance, some of the places (Cheltenham for instance) were strict, highly academic, and the girls that left there were more likely to continue into higher education. Others were more practically minded (or obsessed with horses and sports) and the girls that left there were generally encouraged to go to secretarial college and then look for a husband almost immediately after entering the workforce. It's an eye-opening read about what it was like for these upper-crust girls who were sent away by their families and then suppressed by these same people into wanting less for themselves. I highly recommend this not only because it's extremely well-written and researched but also because it's so fascinating comparing it to the way young women of today are educated and their expectations after leaving school. 10/10

Source: readingfortheheckofit.blogspot.com
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review 2017-03-24 22:10
The Fire Child by S.K. Tremayne
The Fire Child by S. K. Tremayne (2016-06-16) - S.K. Tremayne

This review can also be found at Carole's Random Life in Books.

I liked this book quite a bit. This turned out to be quite the page turner and I ended up liking it even more than The Ice Twins. This was a book that I never knew quite what might happen next. I ended up reading this whole book in a little more than 24 hours because I had such a hard time putting it down. I am very glad that I decided to pick this book up.

The story opens with Rachel and David as newlyweds at his family home, Carnhallow House. Rachel is now the step-mother to David's son, Jamie, whose mother has recently died. It is a huge adjustment for Rachel and the day to day task of caring for Jamie falls largely to her since David is away during most of the week for work. Jamie is still grieving the loss of his mother and it is showing in some of his actions. Rachel starts to wonder about what really happened to Jamie's mother and starts asking a lot of questions.

I thought this book had a whole lot going for it. It went in directions that I would have never imagined and I love being taken by surprise with this kind of book. The pacing was perfectly done with enough action to really keep the pages turning. Jamie was one of the creepiest kids that I remember reading about in a book which was a big plus. Add in the old house and the mining tunnels running all over the place and there is a whole lot of creepy in this story. I never really knew if I should trust Rachel. I think that Rachel's character was written in such a way that it was hard to tell if she was actually psychotic or if these things were really happening.

I would definitely recommend this book to fans of psychological thrillers. This was one of those books that made me wonder if any of the characters should be trusted but I had to keep reading to figure out what was real. This is the second book by S.K. Tremayne that I have read and I can't wait to read more.

I received an advance reader edition of this book from Grand Central Publishing.

Initial Thoughts
I enjoyed this one quite a bit. I thought that the kid in this story was pretty creepy which I loved! The story took a lot of unexpected twists that kept me guessing.

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review 2017-03-23 01:53
The Abuse of Ashley Collins - Jon Athan

 

I don’t  know why I ever chose to torture myself and willingly read A CHILD CALLED IT,  but Dave Pelzer broke something inside me – I haven’t been right since.  Knowing that, you’d think I’d have learned a lesson, (yeah, I know… I’m audibly laughing right now, too).  Nope. Years after ‘ACCI’ I decided that I wanted to read THE GIRL NEXT DOOR, and I let Jack Ketchum walk right in and start poking at the wound that David Pelzer left with a big, pointy stick.  I think it was the masochist in me who invited Mendal W. Johnson to drop by and sucker-punch my PTSD in the back of the head.  As far as the ‘Let’s Go Play At The Adams fiction/non-fiction debate’ goes – I’m sticking with IT’S FICTION, but I’m sure all the atrocities have been committed, many times, and on many different Barbaras. 
Like LGPATATHE ABUSE OF ASHLEY COLLINS is not a true story – but it very well could be. Watching the decreasing sanity, and the elevating brutality of Ashley’s parents demonstrates just how fast situations can escalate. One little poke at the wrong moment, and all control is lost – you can’t come back from certain things.

       

THIS IS A WORK OF FICTION. It is disturbing, and hard to read at times, but the author is not exploiting issues to gain shock value for a horror story. Jon Athan comes at the story from every possible angle, from every p.o.v., and sheds light on problems that most families would keep hidden in the dark. Let me misquote one of my favorite movies before you start reading…

WARNING: This book contains scenes of graphic violence, including violence towards children. This book is about abuse—verbal, physical, and emotional. This book does not feature any explicit sex scenes, but it does discuss sexual abuse. This book is not intended for those easily offended or appalled.

Ashley Collins, a sixteen-year-old girl, has severe behavior issues. She regularly fights with her parents, Logan and Jane. When the fights become personal and physical, Logan and Jane decide to take matters into their own hands. They chain their daughter in the basement and abuse her in an attempt to rescue her from her bad behavior… while delving into their own deviance and depravity.

This is a story of family and abuse. This is a story of violence and discipline. This is the abuse of Ashley Collins.

Jon Athan, author of A Family of Violence, brings you an uncompromising vision of human horror. Can the cycle of abuse be broken?

 

Find The Abuse of Ashley Collins on Goodreads, Amazon, and it’s available through the KU program.

Connect with the author via Twitter – @Jonny_Athan, Facebook,  through the officialJon Athan Website, or his author pages on Goodreads, BookLikes, LibraryThing  &Amazon. You can email him directly at: info@jon-athan.com, or head on over to the West Coast and start stalking him the old fashioned way!

 

* I'm really glad that you didn't shelf the idea/book, and I think that THE ABUSE OF ASHLEY COLLINS is a better title than your original title. In fact, I think I may have misinterpreted 'A GENERATION OF ABUSE' when I first read it. I was going over my notes and highlights for the review when it clicked - <i>the cycle of abuse</i> - "ahh... OK".

* You made a comment on the 'Join the mailing list' page, and if I WASN'T searching for the things that you mentioned, I sure am now!! It may be a 'private matter', but... we're friends, right? :) IDEA!! If you collect all of the police files, doctor notes, patient files, and maybe even a "found" journal of Ashley's - it could sell as a companion book to THE ABUSE OF ASHLEY COLLINS.

* Something you said (after the story, before 'Dear Reader') made me [inappropriately] giggle for a second - (you know... that <em>super disturbed, "I know I'm going to Hell", "Don't judge me!</em>" giggle? No? Ever laugh at a funeral? Um... OK. Nvmnd).
<blockquote><strong>"[...] Sure, there were a few things that may seem outlandish, especially towards the end [...]"</strong></blockquote>
Well... there was something on the news just a few days ago -
<blockquote>"On Monday, March 6th, 2017 - North Carolina authorities arrived on the scene to witness 18 year old suspect, Oliver Funes Oliver Funes Machado, exit the family home "carrying a knife in one hand and a severed human head in the other."
Authorities found what was left of her body between the kitchen and living room. Funes-Machado had also told the dispatcher his 4-year-old and 2-year-old siblings were in the house. He said his father was not home.
The younger sisters were not hurt, and a teenage brother was at school."</blockquote>
<strong>Peace, Love & Necrophilia ♥</strong>
<strong> <em>~  </em>šhαd⊕ω gïrレ</strong>

 

(spoiler show)

 

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text 2017-03-21 13:20
Squeeeee!
Sweet Child of Time: Episode Seven of The Chronicles of the Harekaiian - Shanna Lauffey

Just got my early reviewer copy of the next book in the time travel series I love so much. Great timing as I just finished another book and my other books on the go might be moving slowly.

 

Really looking forward to starting this today.

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review SPOILER ALERT! 2017-03-16 01:18
Soviet's agent take the red pill
Child 44 - Tom Rob Smith

Leo's awakening.

 

In the beginning of the book, Leo is a strong, effective state agent. 

 

Then things happened that begin to shake his faith of the state, or the state methodology. He was an agent of the state that caught citizens who were accused of subversion. Yet, these people who are caught are not bad people, they are just normal people who would confess to anything if they were being tortured. 

 

Then he found out that he has been living in a lie. 

 

Not only he fantasied about his job, he has romanticised about courtship with his wife.

 

It is all a lie. And Leo begin to see the truth. The truth that put his life in danger.

 

It started with a denial of a child found killed near the railroad track. Leo delivered the state position that it was an accident.

 

Leo was also smart and he found out more information that it was no accident. That is against the state position, and all the excuse needed to get him into trouble.

 

He was also lied to by his wife.

 

A lot of lies.

 

Leo was happy when he didn't know the truth.

 

This is a Russia, Soviet era Matrix story. Would he rather take the red pill or the blue pill.

 

He take  the red pill and now the illusion is off and the harsher reality review itself. 

 

Almost to the end of the book. Good story telling. The movie didn't do it justice as a lot of subplot, the more internal revealing of the truth is not shown. 

 

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