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review 2018-08-10 16:36
Teaching responsibility
One Step at a Time - Aharon, Sara Y.,Bryn Pennetti

The following book was kindly sent to me by the author, Sara Y. Aharon, who requested a review. This book will be published on September 1, 2018 and you can check out the author's website or Amazon for more information on purchasing the book.

 

One Step at a Time by Sara Y. Aharon is a picture book which teaches children the value of perseverance and personal growth. Emma is a little girl who loves butterflies so it's lucky that her classroom has one for a pet. However, Emma gets so excited about playing with Belle the Butterfly that she accidentally sets her free. What should she do? Can she ever face her teacher and classmates again?  One Step at a Time demonstrates the advantages of accepting responsibility even when it's uncomfortable (especially then) and how being brave doesn't necessarily mean that you are totally confident that things will go your way. It's a gentle way to visually display the significance of doing the right thing even when you may be afraid. As this is self-published, I think there are a few things that could be done to set it apart and give it a chance against some of its mainstream contemporaries. Adding questions to test comprehension at the back of the book (nothing too daunting) would give the message that this would be a great teaching supplement. Perhaps including a link back to the author's website where additional information about metamorphosis and free downloadable butterfly coloring sheets are available would sweeten the pot even further. [A/N: I give these suggestions based on my own experience reading children's books and recommending them to the parents and teachers in my community. These are definitely hot ticket additions to any book and would make a great selling point. ;-)] It's a cute little story that has a good message. 7/10

 

What's Up Next: Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison

 

What I'm Currently Reading: Mary B: An Untold Story of Pride and Prejudice by Katherine J. Chen

 

Source: readingfortheheckofit.blogspot.com
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quote 2018-08-09 05:34
“Come here, little girl. I know what you want, little girl.” It was a rustling voice, scratchy and dry. It made Coraline think of some kind of enormous dead insect. Which was silly, she knew. How could a dead thing, especially a dead insect, have a voice?

She walked through several rooms with low, slanting ceilings until she came to the final room. It was a bedroom, and the other crazy old man upstairs sat at the far end of the room, in the near darkness, bundled up in his coat and hat.

As Coraline entered he began to talk. “Nothing’s changed, little girl,” he said, his voice sounding like the noise dry leaves make as they rustle across a pavement. “And what if you do everything you swore you would? What then? Nothing’s changed. You’ll go home. You’ll be bored. You’ll be ignored. No one will listen to you, not really listen to you. You’re too clever and too quiet for them to understand. They don’t even get your name right.

“Stay here with us,” said the voice from the figure at the end of the room. “We will listen to you and play with you and laugh with you. Your other mother will build whole worlds for you to explore, and tear them down every night when you are done. Every day will be better and brighter than the one that went before. Remember the toy box? How much better would a world be built just like that, and all for you?”

“And will there be gray, wet days where I just don’t know what to do and there’s nothing to read or to watch and nowhere to go and the day drags on forever?” asked Coraline.

From the shadows, the man said, “Never.”

“And will there be awful meals, with food made from recipes, with garlic and tarragon and broad beans in?” asked Coraline.

“Every meal will be a thing of joy,” whispered the voice from under the old man’s hat. “Nothing will pass your lips that does not entirely delight you.”

“And could I have Day-Glo green gloves to wear, and yellow Wellington boots in the shape of frogs?” asked Coraline.

“Frogs, ducks, rhinos, octopuses—whatever you desire. The world will be built new for you every morning. If you stay here, you can have whatever you want.”

Coraline sighed. “You really don’t understand, do you?” she said. “I don’t want whatever I want. Nobody does. Not really. What kind of fun would it be if I just got everything I ever wanted? Just like that, and it didn’t mean anything. What then?”

“I don’t understand,” said the whispery voice.

“Of course you don’t understand,” she said, raising the stone with the hole in it to her eye. “You’re just a bad copy she made of the crazy old man upstairs.”
Coraline - Neil Gaiman,Dave McKean

I'm currently re-reading this book (I got Scribd back again!!) and I came to this scene. It really is true what Coraline says and I think we forget that. Also just because you might get everything you want... that doesn't equal happiness.

 

20764916

 

[This bit of wisdom from a Children's book (though I believe no matter your age, you should be able to read any book/books shouldn't have age limits) Coraline by Neil Gaiman.]

 

 

 

*Not sponsored:(I'm nobody) For those who don't know, Scribd is an ebook and audiobook subscription service. I really like it! They don't have the largest catalog, but enough to make the price worth it. $8.99 a month, and I think they might have a free trial. Heck, if you read or listen to one book, I believe you got your money's worth. Scribd's worldwide! You'll be able to access Scribd in any country unless local service providers or authorities have blocked it. Please note: not every title is available in every country.

 

Sharing this, because I wish I had known about it sooner!

Source: www.goodreads.com/book/show/17061.Coraline
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text 2018-08-08 21:58
My July 2018
Dear Ijeawele, or A Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions - Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
Miraculous - Das verwunschene Parfüm - Barbara Neeb,Katharina Schmidt
Always Never Yours - Austin Siegemund-Broka,Emily Wibberley
Children of Blood and Bone: Goldener Zorn - Tomi Adeyemi,Andrea Fischer
Harry Potter und der Halbblutprinz - J.K. Rowling
Dear Ijeawele, or A Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions - 5 stars
Miraculous - Das verwunschene Parfüm - 5 stars
Always Never Yours - 5 stars
Children of Blood and Bone: Goldener Zorn - 4 stars
Harry Potter und der Halbblutprinz - 5 stars

 

Favorite book(s) of the month: Dear Ijeawele, Always Never Yours, Harry Potter (duh!)

 

Books started this month but haven't finished yet: Manga Classics: Romeo And Juliet

 

Look at me, finally posting my wrap up. I don't know why it's taking me so freaking long, it's not like I have tons of books to talk about. But 5 are not that bad, I'm actually super happy about it, especially since they all got a really good raiting from me, and were seriously soooo good. I'm still mad about me, for not finishing Romeo and Julie yet. I hate this play since highschool, I never read it there, and I have so many problems with it, still, even when it's in Manga format and way easier to read. I just don't like the story. Here we go, now I put a freaking mini review in this wrap up LOL

 
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review 2018-08-05 17:30
Some Journey's Takes Us Further... And Weirder.
Beneath the Sugar Sky - Seanan McGuire

Where Every Heart A Doorway shows us a world where doors are open to the hearts of children that leads to home instead of the real world we live in, Beneath the Sugar Sky answers the questions why these doors exist and how time plays its role in it. The third book of the Wayward Children series continues from Every Heart A Doorway when a girl, out of nowhere drops off from the sky and lands on a lake near Eleanor West's Home for Wayward Children. It was this girl, that takes ChristopherKade and two other new characters (Cora and Nadya) on an adventure through a world of Confection. From there, its starts to get a little weird.

 

Although I would love to reveal more but if no one has read the first book, I won't write much of it here. Still, this is a hard book to rate. I am torn between 4 star rating or a 3.5 star. You see, this doesn't feel much for me in ways to really say this is better or as good as Down Among the Sticks and Bones, its more of an adventure quest to me. Although it does answer more questions about doorways open for certain children and some times, its possible that its open for all, its enough to fulfill fans of this series that might have some questions that are finally answered here. Here, we get to know more about Christopher and his abilities, a new main character Cora taking the lead here and an old familiar face returns that will excite fans. Overall, I like it still so likely this is one series I will be staying but its a long wait for me to read the next chapter. Beneath the Sugar Sky can be fun to read, and funny at times too. This is a fantasy novella that I feel deserves some attention.

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review 2018-08-02 22:31
Children of Time: The space spider book I came to love
Children of Time - Adrian Tchaikovsky

This was the surprise book of the year for me. When my book club selected this for our reading list I pretty much immediately decided it would be my skip for the year - I don't like giant doorstoppers and I hate spiders, so a 600 page epic about space spiders sounded dreadful. As the date grew closer I decided I'd give it a shot, giving myself permission to bail at any moment without guilt (I finish almost every book I start). And guess what? I finished it. Not only that I really enjoyed it.

 

This book is classic hard sci-fi. Full of weird science, alien worlds, and a slow build. Alternating chapters between the humans of a generation ship and the spiders of the green world you get two distinct plot lines that promise to eventually intersect. The human side of the story evoked a bit of a time travel story for me as the central character continually exits cryosleep to discover his "world" has changed and moved forward in unexpected ways. The spider side of the story actually became my favorite as you watch their civilization evolve over many many generations, one genetic line remaining our constant thread (no pun intended).

 

This book is a very slow burn. The thing that took me most off guard was how the two plot lines stayed separate for so long. I was expecting the book to be about the clash between these two cultures, but instead it is an exploration of them so that once they do meet you can fully understand where both are coming from. I quite enjoyed the ending, which I think I would have scoffed at had it not seemed so earned. This book takes its time, but that's an important component of what makes it effective. I actually found myself emotional from time to time about the lives of spiders, something I never thought I'd say.

 

If you're longing for a good old fashioned hard sci-fi with a focus on world building and cultural anthropology you won't want to miss this book. It kept me invested and curious all the way to the end.

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