logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: children-s
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-12-13 16:28
Great ending!
By Rick Riordan: The Last Olympian (Percy Jackson & the Olympians, Book 5) - -Disney Hyperion Books for Children-

Wow, this last book in the series was packed full of action and so good! I mean it starts off fast and doesn't slow till the very end as the Campers take on Kronos.  There are a few disgruntled Campers who refuse to fight at first but everyone has their place and time in the battle.

 

Percy and his friend are doing their best to protect Manhattan where Olympus is because the gods are off fighting other battles which is what Kronos wants. Typhon is causing a huge storm over the midwest and that is where most of the gods are and to normal humans it just looks like a huge and deadly storm not a huge monster. 

 

Percy is worried about making the wrong decisions as everyone thinks he is the hero that will either let Olympus fall or he will save it. He has a lot on his shoulders but the ending was surprising and it was interesting to see what happens to everyone in the end. 

 

As much as I love Percy and Annabelle I think Tyson and Grover will be my favorites from this series! They both just make me laugh especially Tyson! He was so brave!!

 

I don't want to say a lot about what happened cause it would be horrible to spoil this really good book ending! So just know that I really enjoyed this series and if you haven't tried it yet you really should!! I can't wait to try some more of this author's series now that I got this one done. 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-12-13 09:01
Polly Diamond and the Magic Book written by Alice Kuipers and illustrated by Diana Toledano
Polly Diamond and the Magic Book: Book 1... Polly Diamond and the Magic Book: Book 1 - Alice Kuipers,Diana Toledano
Polly Diamond and the Magic Book written by Alice Kuipers and illustrated by Diana Toledano is a children's book written for ages four to eight years.
 
Polly loves words and writing stories and lists. She believes amazing things happen in threes. Her mother is expecting another baby, so her three-year-old sister, Anna (the sparkle princess) moved into Polly's room. She's not happy about it.
 
Her father is a contractor and always has a project going in the house. Polly's new magic book allows her to make things happen that she writes. She's imaginative and creative. It is a fun story to read. I gave it five stars.
 
I received an Advanced Reading Copy from Chronicle Books and NetGalley. That did not change my opinion for this review.
 
It is in pre-order status until May 18, 2018 so I could not leave a review on Amazon or Barnes & Noble.
 
Link to purchase: https://www.amazon.com/Polly-Diamond-Magic-Book/dp/1452152322
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2017-12-12 23:48
Reading progress update: I've listened 376 out of 990 minutes.
Children of Time - Adrian Tchaikovsky,William Henry Hudson

The debate on its purpose and meaning – on the lesson that the arrival of such a prodigy was intended to teach – lasted for generations, over the whole span of the creature’s long life and beyond. Its behaviour was strange and complex, but it seemed mute, producing no kind of gesture or vibration that could be considered an attempt at speech. Some noted that when it opened and closed its mouth, a cleverly designed web could catch a curious murmur, the same that might be felt when objects were pounded together. It was a vibration that travelled through the air, rather than across a strand or through the ground. For some time this was hypothesized as a means of communication, provoking much intelligent debate, but in the end the absurdity of such an idea won out. After all, using the same orifice for eating and communication was manifestly too inefficient. The spiders are not deaf, exactly, but their hearing is deeply tied into their sense of touch and vibration. The giant’s utterances, all the frequencies of human speech, are not even whispers to them.

 

The spiders are awesome. They also see value in preserving ecological diversity.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2017-12-12 03:07
Reading progress update: I've listened 355 out of 990 minutes.
Children of Time - Adrian Tchaikovsky,William Henry Hudson

They could hear Bales screaming as soon as the outer door opened. The woman lay on the ground just outside, smashing both hands against her suit, kicking and flailing as though beset by an invisible attacker. Everyone except Holsten and Tevik piled out to help her, trying to get her under control. They were shouting her name now, but she was oblivious, thrashing out at them, then trying to force her helmet off as though she was suffocating. One foot was a red ruin – seeming half cut away – the leg of her suit slashed open with a weird precision.


It was Nessel that released the catch and dragged Bales’s helmet off, but the screaming had already turned to a ghastly liquid sound before then, and what came out first, after the seal broke, was blood.


Bales’s head flopped aside, eyes wide, mouth open and running with red. Something moved at her throat. Holsten got sight of it just as everyone else suddenly recoiled: a head rising from the ruin of the woman’s throat, twin blades brandished at them under a pair of crooked antennae that flicked drops of Bales left and right as they fidgeted and danced.

 

Mwahaha. Meet...the ants!

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-12-11 22:41
A morally ambiguous thriller and a story of tainted friendships that will appeal to readers of King’s It.
The Chalk Man: A Novel - Tasha Tudor

Thanks to NetGalley and to Penguin UK for offering me an ARC copy of this novel that I freely chose to review.

This story, told in two different time frames by Eddie Adams (known as Eddie Munster as a child, because all the friends had nicknames and somehow the Munsters and the Adams became conflated into one…), has all the elements fans of mysteries and thrillers love. Strange characters, plenty of secrets, red herrings and false clues, lies, many suspects, a slightly odd setting, bizarre murders, strange relationships… A murder involving bizarre circumstances (a chopped-up body with a missing head, strange chalk drawings…) took place in a small and picturesque UK city (it sounds small enough to be a town, but as it has a cathedral, it is a city) in 1986 (although there were other strange things that happened at the time too, coincidental or not), and became known as the Chalk-Man murder. Thirty years later someone starts asking questions and stirring things up. Eddie narrates, in the first-person, the events, including his memories of what happened when he was a teenager and also telling us what is happening now. Those of you who read my blog know I have a thing for unreliable narrators, and, well, Eddie is a pretty good one. He is an English high school teacher and seems fairly reliable and factual in his account, and he does a great job of making us feel the emotions and showing us (rather than telling us) the events; although slowly he starts revealing things about himself that make him less standard and boring, and slightly more intriguing. Eddie does not have all the information (it seems that the friends kept plenty of things from each other as children), and sometimes he is unreliable because of the effect of alcohol, and possibly his mental state (his father suffered early dementia and he is concerned that he might be going down the same path). But there are other things at play, although we don’t fully get to know them until the very end.

The story reminded me of Stephen King’s It, most of all because of the two time-frames and of the story of the children’s friendship, although the horror element is not quite as strong (but there are possible ghosts and other mysterious things at play), and the friends and their friendship is more suspect and less open. In some ways, the depiction of the friend’s relationship, and how it changes over time, is more realistic. Of course, here the story is told from Eddie’s point of view, and we share in his likes and dislikes, that are strongly coloured by the events and his personal opinions. The main characters are realistically portrayed (both from a child’s perspective and later from an adult one), complex, and none of them are totally good, or 100% likeable, but they are sympathetic and not intentionally bad or mean (apart from a couple of secondary characters but then… there is a murderer at work). Morality is ambiguous at best, and people do questionable things for reasons that seem fully justified to them at the time, or act without thinking of the consequences with tragic results. I am not sure I felt personally engaged with any of the characters (perhaps because of Eddie’s own doubts), but I liked the dubious nature of the narration, and the fact that there were so many unknowns, so many gaps, and that we follow the process of discovery up-close, although there are things the main character knows that are only revealed very late in the game (although some he seems to have buried and tried hard to forget). The parents, and secondary characters, even when only briefly mentioned, serve the purpose well, add a layer of complexity to the story and are consistent throughout the narration.

The mystery had me engaged, and the pieces fit all together well, even when some of them are not truly part of the puzzle. I can’t say I guessed what had happened, although I was suspicious of everyone and, let’s say I had good reason to be. I liked the ending, not only the resolution of the mystery but what happens to Eddie. If you read it, you’ll know what I mean.

The writing is fluid, it gives the narrator a credible voice, it gets the reader under the character’s skin, and it creates a great sense of place and an eerie atmosphere that will keep readers on alert. The story deals with serious subjects, including child abuse, bullying (and sexual abuse), dementia, and although it is not the most graphically violent story I have read, it does contain vivid descriptions of bodies and crime scenes, and it definitely not a cozy mystery and not for the squeamish reader.

A great new writer, with a very strong voice and great ability to write psychological thrillers, and one I hope to read many more novels by. 

 

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?