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review 2018-11-19 21:03
A Festive Re-read
Winter Solstice - Rosamunde Pilcher

I read this book nearly every year in the weeks leading up to Christmas. I have loved Rosamund Pilcher's sagas since I picked up The Shell Seekers at a Barnes and Noble somewhere around 20 years ago. I passed it onto my mother, who fell in love with her writing.

 

I don't know if Winter Solstice is my favorite Pilcher, but it is such a comfortable read for me that I can't give it less than 5 stars. I love all of the characters, and I love the theme of the book, which really acknowledges that sometimes your most important family is the family that you create. The relationship that grows between the lonely Lucy, whose self-centered parents are wrapped up too deeply into their own lives to give her the attention she deserves and Elfrida, her great-aunt, a former actress who never had children, but whose peripatetic life was endlessly fulfilling, is perfect. 

 

This is one of those books that I can't see clearly, because it has become a part of my bookish DNA. I've read it probably dozens of times, and each time I pick it up, it's like saying hello to a group of old friends that I've not seen for a while. The best kind of comfort read.

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review 2018-11-17 13:20
Review: “Winter Oranges” by Marie Sexton
Winter Oranges - Marie Sexton

 

~ 4.5 stars ~

 

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text 2018-10-25 17:03
Audible Halloween $6.95 Sale!
Carrion Comfort - Dan Simmons
The Collector - John Fowles
Joplin's Ghost - Tananarive Due
Secondhand Spirits - Juliet Blackwell
Thornwood House - Anna Romer
The Lottery and Other Stories - Shirley Jackson
FantasticLand - Mike Bockoven
Hell House - Richard Matheson
They Thirst - Robert R. McCammon
Cold Moon Over Babylon - Michael McDowell

Oh boy, I took in a huge book haul. Just when I'm fed up on horror and mystery and ready for nothing but non-fantastical fiction for a while. But oh, well, these will keep until I'm ready for chills and thrills again. 

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text 2018-10-21 22:48
Reading progress update: I've read 1 out of 336 pages.
Hallowe'en Party - Agatha Christie

This is a reread, but I couldn't resist. I sold books back to Powell's today - a disappointing total, tbh, only $84.00 in credit, but I snagged a Berkley paperback from 1991 for $4.50 while I was there. I'm holding onto the credit for my daughter's Christmas trip home and we will go have a delightful spree!

 

Anyway, this is a comfortable old Agatha, featuring Ariadne Oliver, my favorite recurring character.

 

"I don't think she was a very nice girl," said Mrs. Oliver, "not one you'd want to talk to much. She was the sort of girl who shows off and boasts. It's a rather tiresome age, I think. It sounds unkind what I am saying, but--"

 

"It is not unkind in a murder to say what the victim was like," said Poirot. " It is very, very necessary. The personality of the victim is the cause of many a murder..."

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text 2018-10-06 11:59
Reading progress update: I've listened to 492 out of 492 minutes.
The Murder at the Vicarage: A Miss Marple Mystery - Agatha Christie,Richard E. Grant

Finished last night.

 

To the resident Christie (and Miss Marple) fans: Do you recall Christie saying anywhere that Colonel Melchett is a Scot?  Because that's the accent that Richard E. Grant gives him.  I totally wouldn't rule out that he's got a point -- he picked up on Christie's characterization of Lawrence Redding as Irish, too, and that's easy enough to miss as it is -- but if he's right about Melchett, then boy do I have to reread all of the Miss Marple mysteries that are actually set in St. Mary Mead to see what I've been missing about Melchett.

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