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text 2018-05-23 02:29
Summer Reading List 2018
Pete Rose: An American Dilemma - Kostya Kennedy
First Love, Last Rites - Ian McEwan
The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket - Edgar Allan Poe,Richard Kopley
Leviathan - Scott Westerfeld,Keith Thompson
Three Tall Women - Edward Albee
Homegoing - Yaa Gyasi
The Tenant of Wildfell Hall - Anne Brontë

I'm well behind pace in my reading this year. I always say I "average" a book a week, for 52 or so books a year, but I usually exceed that by a fair margin. This year, I'm quite slow. Only 16 so far - even though at least two were "doorstops."

 

So two weeks ago, when I realized I hadn't even considered my summer reading list, I was worried. But when I finally sat down to compose it, the list came flowing straight out. Easy-peasy, less than an hour's contemplation, for sure.

 

The fact I've been using the same nine categories for years, I'm sure, helps considerably. Three books for each month of summer. Things that make me happy and better-rounded. Plenty of room left for serendipity and other titles. Here goes:

The list.

 

1. A baseball book - "Pete Rose: An American Dilemma" by Kostya Kennedy. Reading a baseball book - fiction or non-fiction - is a summer tradition. Thanks, Casey Awards for the ready-made list. 

 

2. A Michael Chabon book - "Pops: Fatherhood in Pieces." This was both tough and incredibly easy. I've read all of Chabon's books, except some very hard to get screenplays and graphic novels. Luckily, he has a new book out this month. It's an anthology of his magazine essays, in the mode of "Maps and Legends," but it's better than none!

 

3. An Ian McEwan book - "First Love, Last Rites." I've read all of McEwan's recent stuff, so I have to reach way back into the Ian Macabre phase, which I like less, but it needs to be done. At least there's a new McEwan adaptation coming out in theaters soon.

 

4. A Neglected Classic - "The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket," Edgar Allen Poe's only novel. Not one that was really on my radar, but read entry five for more "why." 

 

5. A recent "big" book - "Pym" by Mat Johnson. I have the opportunity to hear Johnson read in June, and I think it's time to read his novel, inspired by Poe's, as listed above. 

 

6. A YA book - "Leviathan" by Scott Westerfeld. A steampunk, World War I revisionist novel? Yes, please. 

 

7. A Play - "Three Tall Women" by Edward Albee. It's in revival on Broadway right now with Laurie Metcalf. You know I won't make it to Manhattan, so I'd better finally read it.

 

8. A Recommendation from a Friend - "Homegoing" by Yaa Gyasi. My friend, Laura, suggested it. She didn't have to suggest very hard, because I was already meaning to read it. And she loaned me her copy!

 

9. The book I didn't read from last year's list - "The Tenant of Wildfell Hall" by Anne Bronte. There's one every year. This year's will probably be the Chabon, just because it's new and might be hard to acquire through library means.

 

Well, that's it. I'll post a list on the booklikes list app. Will you read along with me? What's on your list for Summer '18? 

 

-cg

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text 2018-05-23 01:01
Reading progress update: I've read 37 out of 312 pages.
Forest of Secrets - Erin Hunter

I think Hunter does a good job of showing the natural drama and hierarchy of cats. As someone with 5 of them, I can tell you they are fickle creatures. They can love one another and lick themselves one second, then be in an all-out brawl the next because one gave the other a dirty look. They're like effing high school girls.

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review 2018-05-22 15:54
Review: A Court of Frost and Starlight (A Court of Thorns and Roses #3.1) by Sarah J. Maas
A Court of Frost and Starlight - Sarah J. Maas

 

 

Feyre, Rhys, and their close-knit circle of friends are still busy rebuilding the Night Court and the vastly-changed world beyond. But Winter Solstice is finally near, and with it, a hard-earned reprieve.

Yet even the festive atmosphere can't keep the shadows of the past from looming. As Feyre navigates her first Winter Solstice as High Lady, she finds that those dearest to her have more wounds than she anticipated--scars that will have far-reaching impact on the future of their Court

 

 

 

 

Most people who follow my reviews know that I LOVE Sarah J Maas and that she can do no wrong to me …. Or so I thought. I was really looking forward to this book since I was in a desperate need of my Rhysand fix.

Of course, once I got the book, I dove right into but quickly realized it is not the same. It was pretty slow and kind of boring as we pretty much follow Rhysand, Feyre and gang follow as they prepare for the Winter Solstice and recalling time since we left them in the last book.  The book felt a bit forced to me, too many thing to little time but mostly forced and r rushed I can’t really decided but I think a bit both.

Also I didn’t really like that it switched POV from first to third person. We get Rhysand and Feye in first person and Cassian and Mor in third person, which kind of interrupted the flow of the book for me. But that is maybe just me and most people don’t mind it. 

The book did pick up and we did get plenty of Rhys and Feyre smexy time and a good amount of out favorite fae lord lol.

Overall, I enjoyed it plenty just not as much as I thought I would.

I rate it 3★ and I’m really looking forward to the next main/spin-off book.

 

Buy Links 

Amazon *** B&N *** Kobo 

 

Source: snoopydoosbookreviews.com/index.php/2018/05/22/review-a-court-of-frost-and-starlight-a-court-of-thorns-and-roses-3-1-by-sarah-j-maas
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review 2018-05-22 06:06
Book Tour: The Accidental Guardian
The Accidental Guardian - Mary Connealy

Are you a person would would like to see what an wagon trail is like. Learn about it some what. Well you get glimpses of it though the accidental guardian. You can see what it like to be a survivor of a wagon train.

 

We find out about Tracy Riley and some of his past. He has to protect not only woman but also two children. They are survivors of the wagon train. We seem to be following more of Deb's story rather then her little sister Gwen and the children. Though maybe in the second book we learn more about the children and Gwen story.

 

Deb is adventurous and Trace and seem interested in Tracy from  the beginning. Trace put Deb in his bed that first night. Is there romance between them or not?

Source: nrcbooks.blogspot.com/2018/05/book-tour-accidental-guardian.html
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text 2018-05-22 00:41
Reading progress update: I've read 62 out of 191 pages.
My Little Pony: Daring Do and the Eternal Flower (The Daring Do Adventure Collection) - G.M. Berrow

Okay, these Daring Do books are actually well written and super fun for middle grade adventure books.

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