logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: dan-brown
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
review 2018-04-11 13:24
Flying at Night - Rebecca L. Brown

Fly at Night was emotionally pulling.    I felt for Piper, I disliked her mother, I wanted to give her husband a guiding hand, and I wanted to hug her son.     Piper was overwhelmed.    Her mother was selfish, although with the abusive lifestyle she lived in she was due to be selfish.      Her husband just needs someone to show him what to do, he wants to help but doesn’t quite know what to do.    Curtis, her son, has autism and lives a full life with just some idiosyncrasies that make him sometimes hard to understand.  

 

I felt for Piper.     She is a stay at home mom with so much on her plate and she doesn’t ask for help.    Piper has an autistic son, a father who is now mentally challenged after having a heart attack, and a husband who seems to want to help but doesn’t know what to do.   Add to that a mother who walked away and left her to deal with everything.     I am not sure how much more she could handle without crumbling.

 

This book was interesting, I enjoyed it.   Yet, it felt like I was reading a story.  I know I was but I like to fall into my books, become attached to the characters, and become invested in the plot.    With Fly at Night I wasn’t as invested in the story.    I enjoyed it, I wanted to know what happens, and I am glad that I took the time to read it.  

Source: asoccermomsbookblog.blogspot.com
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-04-06 17:45
Someone Is Trying To Kill Me. I Think It's The Man I Love.
Nine Coaches Waiting (Rediscovered Classics) - Mary Stewart

I know, I know, that post title could apply to basically every single gothic romance ever. In fact, as Linda Hilton knows, as I actually cribbed the title from an essay she discusses in this post (which is well worth reading, so you should read it!).

 

Nine Coaches Waiting centers around Linda Martin, a young French woman who is hired as the English speaking governess for Count Philippe Valmy, the nine year old heir to the Valmy estate and fortune. There are a couple of "accidents" where Philippe is nearly killed, at which point Linda begins to wonder if they were really "accidents" at all, or if someone really is trying to get rid of the young count.

 

As always, Mary Stewart's descriptions are truly lovely and evocative. Linda meets Raoul Valmy, Philippe's much older cousin, who is dashing and handsome and oh so mysterious. He doesn't live at Chateau Valmy, rather he lives at one of the lesser Valmy family properties near by. As the conspiracy unfolds, Linda falls head over heels in love with the enigmatic Raoul, which she realizes after possibly the most epic first date ever set down in fiction.

 

I am not going to describe that evening in detail though, as it happens, it was desperately important. It was then, simply, one of those wonderful evenings … We stopped in Thonon beside a stall where jonquils and wallflowers blazed under the gas-jets, and he bought me freesias which smelt like the Fortunate Isles and those red anemones that were once called the lilies of the field. Then we drove along in a clear night with stars as warm and a waxing moon staring pale behind the poplars. By the time we reached Geneva – a city of fabulous glitter and strung lights whose reflections swayed and bobbed in the dark waters of the Lake – my spirits were rocketing sky-high; shock, loneliness, the breath of danger all forgotten.

 

OMG, can Mary Stewart turn a phrase or what? 

 

Linda realizes the truth about the so-called accidents and takes flight from the Chateau with young Philippe, and what follows is several chapters of suspense where the two of them are being chased, hiding, escaping and trying to make their way to safety, without really knowing who is behind the attempts to murder Philippe. As was true of This Rough Magic, Stewart has a definite talent for ratcheting up the reader's anxiety. As is de riguer with romantic suspense, there is a happy ending.

 

This is my fifth Mary Stewart, each one more delicious than the last. At some point, I assume, I will have to hit a clunker. 

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-03-23 02:52
Angels and Demons
Angels & Demons - Dan Brown

I had read "The DaVinci Code" a very long time ago, around the time the movie came out. I recently found this book and used the audio to help me get through the book quickly ("reading" in the car or while knitting). 

 

I was a bit shocked to learn that this was Robert Langdon's book #1. He is called to Cern to help find what had been stolen from the Cern in Switzerland and where it had been taken and who had taken it. 

 

A scientist was tortured and murdered and his work was stolen and taken to the Vatican where it was used as a threat to destroy the Catholic Church, just as the Church once tried to destroy the Illuminati. 

 

He uses his knowledge of the Illuminati to find out where the kidnapped Cardinals are going to be found and how they would be murdered. He tries very hard to stop these murders and tries to save the scientist's daughter and partner from being murdered by her captor. 

 

It was an interesting story, that I was glad that I could use the audio with the book in order to find more time to read. This is a story that provided some interesting information about the Cern and the Vatican. I do recommend that this book not be listened to around children unless they can handle the harsh murder descriptions. This limited the time that I could listen (before children woke up and after they went to bed and when I was alone in the car). 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-03-22 23:42
Reading progress update: I've read 77%.
The Man in the Brown Suit - Agatha Christie

I just made it through the "romance" part.

 

 

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-03-22 19:33
Reading progress update: I've read 47%.
The Man in the Brown Suit - Agatha Christie

I am so very glad that Dame Agatha decided on writing murder mysteries, not travel guides:

"By the way, I should like to make clear here and now that this story will not be a story of South Africa. I guarantee no genuine local colour—you know the sort of thing—half a dozen words in italics on every page. I admire it very much, but I can’t do it. In South Sea Islands, of course, you make an immediate reference to bêche-de-mer. I don’t know what bêche-de-mer is, I have never known, I probably never shall know. I’ve guessed once or twice and guessed wrong. In South Africa I know you at once begin to talk about a stoep—I do know what a stoep is—it’s the thing round a house and you sit on it. In various other parts of the world you call it a veranda, a piazza, and a ha-ha. Then again, there are pawpaws. I had often read of pawpaws. I discovered at once what they were, because I had one plumped down in front of me for breakfast. I thought at first that it was a melon gone bad. The Dutch waitress enlightened me, and persuaded me to use lemon juice and sugar and try again. I was very pleased to meet a pawpaw. I had always vaguely associated it with a hula-hula, which, I believe, though I may be wrong, is a kind of straw skirt that Hawaiian girls dance in. No, I think I am wrong—that is a lava-lava.

At any rate, all these things are very cheering after England. I can’t help thinking that it would brighten our cold Island life if one could have a breakfast of bacon-bacon, and then go out clad in a jumper-jumper to pay the books."

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?