logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: Historical
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
text 2018-01-21 05:22
Reading progress update: I've read 50%.
Kidnapped by the Pirate: Gay Romance - Keira Andrews

Two guys basically in a lock-down, stuck with each other. I like to see how enemies-to-lovers situation progresses but feeling claustrophobic-and-bored at the same time? O.o

So sowwyy...... (stars flying off) *cringe, cringe*

I want to see how a character bends and twists and changes and reveals him/herselves in different circumstances. Close quarters are too sheltered, too stagnant, imho :/

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-01-21 03:00
Tiffany Girl by Deeanne Gist
Tiffany Girl: A Novel - Deeanne Gist

Tiffany Girl is set just prior to the 1893 World's Fair. Flossie wants nothing more than to become a painter, so it's a shock when her mother tells her she's going to need to stop attending the New York School of Applied Design, help out more with the sewing (her mother is a dressmaker), and start thinking about getting married. Her father has gambled away enough of the family's money that they can no longer afford her tuition. When Flossie hears about an opportunity to work for Louis Tiffany as one of his "Tiffany Girls" during a glassworkers' strike, she announces that she's moving out and will earn the money for her tuition herself.

Her new life isn't easy, but Flossie is determined to make the best of things. She deals with angry strikers and "bustle pinchers," tries to figure out how to make her finances work out, and deals with her loneliness by encouraging the people at her boarding house to all get to know each other better. One of her fellow boarders is Reeve, a handsome but emotionally closed off journalist who turns his nose up a "New Women" like Flossie.

I feel like I've been in a partial reading slump since coming back from vacation. I haven't been reading much, and I keep losing interest in the things I read. I was worried that the same thing would happen with Tiffany Girl. The book's length was a little daunting, but thankfully it turned out to be a really engaging read. I flew through it and could hardly put it down.

I don't read a lot of Christian romance, and there are only a couple authors I'll pick up without reading reviews first. Deeanne Gist is one of them. The religious aspects of her books are usually pretty light. Faith is important to her characters, but they don't think about it every few pages, and I don't recall ever feeling like Gist preaches at her readers.

The religious aspects of Tiffany Girl were particularly light, although important. One of the things Flossie dealt with was the belief of those around her that God's highest calling for women is bearing children. This was directly opposed to her desire to work for someone like Louis Tiffany, who only allowed women to work for him if they were unmarried. If Flossie wanted her independence, she needed to remain unmarried and childless, or so she believed. Religion also came up a bit while Flossie was looking at Louis Tiffany's finished stained glass windows. For the most part, though, that was it. I could imagine some Christian romance fans wanting more, but for me this worked out just fine.

Watching Flossie and Reeve interact was fun, even though both characters had aspects that annoyed me a little. Reeve's opinions about New Women got my back up, although I'd probably have been on his side where Flossie and her "get to know each other" activities were concerned. The lack of privacy in the boarding house was, in general, a bit horrifying, but Flossie's dinnertime question cards would particularly have made me cringe. There were, in fact, times when her questions touched on sensitive topics. I was a little surprised that Reeve answered some of the questions he was asked, considering how private he tended to be.

Flossie was a bit too in-your-face friendly for me at times. I'm an introvert, and I can clearly imagine myself going out of my way to avoid her for a while in order to avoid her icebreaker games. As far as she was concerned, everyone at the boarding house was like an extended family and, up until the competition for World's Fair tickets started, she probably felt at least a little the same about many of her coworkers.

Although Flossie and Reeve were attracted to each other fairly early on, they both had a bit of growing to do before they properly meshed as a couple. I really liked how things progressed with Reeve. He had to rethink his ideas about women and marriage. He also had to learn to open up more and allow other people into his life, even if only a little. I absolutely adored the scene with Mrs. Dinwiddie near the end. In some ways, it worked better for me than the romance between Reeve and Flossie.

Flossie's developments near the end of the book were pretty painful, and the attention Gist paid to Reeve's efforts to make more friends highlighted, for me, the fact that Flossie didn't seem to have any close female friends. Whereas I enjoyed the direction Reeve's story took, Flossie's "growth" seemed at least in part to involve breaking her down. She learned that not everyone around her was to be trusted, that she couldn't always count on her parents to act as her safety net (although Reeve stepped in and kept this from turning out worse than it might have), and that she'd never

be able to make a career out of the thing she most loved to do

(spoiler show)

. On the plus side, she learned that all of this could happen to her without breaking her.

The moment when Reeve and Flossie met again was nice, although I was a little sad about how long it took for it to happen. I missed getting to see the two of them together more, and Gist sped through their courtship period way too quickly for my tastes. I really liked how she resolved the issues hanging between Reeve and Flossie, although I raised an eyebrow at the fact that they apparently hadn't talked about any of it prior to getting married. I'd have thought Flossie would have wanted to know how Reeve felt about

the idea of her continuing to paint and occasionally make some money of her own

(spoiler show)

before they said their I dos.

All in all, this was a good book and a quicker read than I expected it to be. I need to hunt down more of Gist's stuff.

Extras:

Many of the chapters were accompanied by a one-page black-and-white illustration. Also, there was an author's note with information about Gist's historical research. Gist's author's notes tend to be fascinating, and this one was no exception.

 

(Original review posted on A Library Girl's Familiar Diversions.)

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-01-20 15:32
slow realisation of love
The Rogue Not Taken (Scandal & Scoundrel) - Sarah MacLean

Well that was interesting.  Sophie pushes the bratty husband of her sister in a pond when she finds him with another woman.  She flees the scene, hoping that she will get away. However she ends up in Kingscotte 'King' the Marquess of Eversley's coach as his footman who is heading to his father's estate, many miles from London.

 

She wants to escape the world of London and the strictures but she has no real way to do this without a cascade.

 

King has a problem with his father and the death of an early love he doesn't want love in his life again but she is tempting and he finds himself caring a lot about her and what happens into her. There's shennigans and misunderstanding and a lot of fun and sparkling banter and I really enjoyed it.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-01-20 13:19
Reading progress update: I've read 100%.
'Til Death Do Us Part - Amanda Quick

This was pretty bland. And there was way too much going on that didn't make a lot of sense to me. I usually like Amanda Quick, but this was not my fav.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-01-19 19:52
My copy had a prettier cover.
Sweet Disorder - Rose Lerner

Which I can't be arsed to add. But Lerner's own covers are really lovely!

 

Anyway, I really liked this book. The conflict set around a national election and the complicated rules about who could vote and how to bribe them was original and created realistic, high stakes drama for all the major characters. Some of the political scandals felt a little on the nose, but I don't suppose politics have changed that much.

 

I liked the heroine, and how prickly and self contained she was. Her struggle to decide who to marry, and if she should remarry at all, and her conflicted feelings about her first marriage were very well drawn. I liked that a lot better than Romancelandia's usual virgin widows. She had loved before, did still love her in laws, but still felt like she'd missed out. That interacted well with the hero's poor communication skills, and lack of self awareness. So that the conflict turned into two character who never ever wanted to discuss their feelings trying to open up to each other, which also felt believable, and made me root for them without thinking they were idiots. I also liked that not everyone was a peer, and the book was quite funny.

 

There were about fifteen different side plots, most of which I was invested in, and which all came together reasonably well in the end, However, that did lead to the big dramatic reveal scene feeling a bit rushed. There were just so many people who had to get their oar in by then. That felt like an early book pacing problem, and I bet the rest of the series has improved by then. Some of the gender politics also felt a little modern for folks in 1812. However, given how on the nose the scandals were, I'll take that over period-appropriate horribleness.

 

Will definitely be going back to Lively St. Lemeston in the near future.

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?