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review 2018-02-03 20:25
Weird murders, a London setting, a ticking clock, and a morally ambiguous hero.
Ragdoll: A Novel - Daniel H Cole

Thanks to NetGalley and to Trapeze for offering me an ARC copy of this novel that I freely chose to review.

This novel had passed me by (my to be read list is getting longer and longer) when it was first published, but I have been reading quite a number of thrillers recently, saw this book mentioned, and remembered I had yet to read it.

The ARC copy I read includes a funny introduction by the author, which sets the tone for what is to come quite well, although I did not see it in the look inside feature at the front of the published e-book version. The novel is a hard thriller but with a considerable amount of dark humour thrown in (a very British version of it as well). The initial premise is gripping. We have a brief prologue that introduces us to a past case and a deranged detective, and then we discover that four years later he’s back at work, and he has to investigate a very bizarre case. The ragdoll of the title is the name given to the macabre discovery of a body composed of the parts of six different victims. Not happy with that, the killer also releases a list of names of people and the dates when he intends to kill them. And the said detective (Wolf) is the last one on the list. The methods the killer employs are also very imaginative, and there is plenty of violence (and pretty extreme at that).

This thriller, set in London, follows the format of a police procedural novel, but as some reviewers have noted, it does require a certain amount of suspension of disbelief. The fact that somebody who was as disturbed as Wolf, and who very seriously assaulted a suspect in front of a whole courtroom, is allowed to go back to work, stretches the imagination. The way the team works, that seems confused and disorganised, also will surprise those who appreciate the attention to detail and authenticity. As a psychiatrist who has worked in the UK, I didn’t find the portrayal of the mental health secure unit where Wolf had spent time very realistic either (although one could query the fact that he was not well at the time, and other than a brief visit by one of the members of the team, we don’t have any objective accounts of it), and one hopes that news agencies will not be like the one depicted in the novel either (Wolf’s ex-wife works for a TV news station and becomes involved in the case also). But, if we accept the premises of the novel, and forget about how likely it is that this could happen in the real world, it is difficult to fault the book for its imagination, pace, energy, and for the way it grabs and keeps the reader’s attention.

This novel keeps taking us back to the past, and at some points it felt as if it should have been the second novel in the series, as it is evident that what happened four years earlier has a lot to do with the current events, and the way the narration is structured, around the previous case, is one of the strong points, in my opinion. It is as if the whole department had been affected by what happened to Wolf and it has become something of a dysfunctional family. Although there are things that seem far-fetched, on the other hand, the general feeling of pressure, desperation, media attention, cover-ups… felt very real. I have mentioned dark humour, and there is a very cynical undercurrent permeating the whole book, which suits it well and, perhaps, will be easier to appreciate by those who live in or are familiar with the UK, its politics, and its current social situation. I felt as if it was almost a caricature of the truth. Exaggerated and taken to the extreme but easily recognisable nonetheless.

Although it is not a psychologically complex story (and many of the characters play to stereotype: the older detective who is about to be retired, the young rookie who’s just been transferred from a different section and is a stickler for details and rules, the young attractive female detective who looks up to the lead investigator but whose feelings are unclear…), there is plenty of action and many twists and turns, characters, locations, and the ticking clock makes it a rather tense and intense read that will keep most readers guessing. There are a large number of characters, and although we get to know the members of the New Scotland Yard team fairly well over the novel (although quite a few of them keep secrets and are contradictory at best), victims, witnesses, characters from the personal lives of the detectives… all are given a bit of space, and it is important to pay attention not to get lost, especially because of the way the story is narrated.  The story is told in the third person but from quite a number of characters’ points of view, not always the main characters either, and although I did not find it difficult to follow and it is a good way to keep the intrigue (by switching points of view and giving us snippets of information only some characters have access to), it means readers should not miss a beat.

Notwithstanding the dark and sharp sense of humour, there are some introspective moments, guilty feelings, and characters wrestle with the morality of the situation, although I do not think it breaks new ground or is the most successful attempt at delving into such issues. At some point, the novel seems about to enter into paranormal territory, and it did remind me of Jekyll and Hyde, as there comes a moment when you have to wonder what it takes to make somebody step over the fine line between fighting a monster and becoming the monster. I don’t want to go into too much detail to avoid any spoilers, but let’s say that good and bad are not ultimately such clear-cut concepts as we would like to believe.

This is a very enjoyable page-turner, especially recommended for those who like a tense and gripping read and are not put off by some over-the-top characterisations and some stretching of the truth, and who don’t mind graphic violence and dark humour. And if you enjoy a London setting, even better.  

 

 

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text 2017-12-18 02:44
Reading progress update: I've read 254 out of 384 pages.
Ragdoll: A Novel - Daniel H Cole

what a loonytunes read! but I love it. hope the ending doesn't suck...tomorrow.

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text 2017-12-17 17:24
Reading progress update: I've read 218 out of 384 pages.
Ragdoll: A Novel - Daniel H Cole

if you were living in a city, and all of a sudden there were news reports suggesting that a body had been found, and that the body was actually the stitched-together parts of six bodies, and the body had been theatrically set up in a window across from the high-rise abode of a maverick detective who had taken the law into his own hands over a serial-killer case from years ago...would it all not seem a bit over the top?--unreal? hard to believe? and if more news started coming out, that whoever killed those people and stitched parts of them together had also given the police a list of five future victims to be killed on certain days no matter what precautions were taken, and then reports started hitting the news that the intended targets were being knocked off even despite the advanced warning...would it even feel like you were in the reality we know anymore? top it off with the last intended victim on the target-list being the maverick cop I mentioned, and everyone dying, or being marked for death, being slowly linked to something extreme from the past, and basically, if that was the news for weeks, it would feel like living through The Dark Knight, or Angels & Demons, or at the very least, a Jack the Ripper, or Zodiac Killer case, but with the added detail that the cops were being warned on what days certain specific people were going to be successfully killed. 

 

what I'm trying to say is: I love this type of Extreme, Suspenseful Fiction, but it's amazing how you can buy into this stuff, and love it, but if you really sat back and thought about it, there's a level of absurdity to such a collection of dramatic details, that it's clear why the term "suspension of disbelief" got created. it also makes clear to me why people like me get sucked into this kind of nutbar plotting as a form of escapism, and for others who sample it, the result might be a blog entry starting with "I got about 50 pages in...and then I threw this rubbish against the wall...".

 

anyway, that's just me trying to figure out why I love stories that are really...outside the bounds of what normally happens in the world of cops and killers--even though the world lately seems to be crossing the line into this territory. the last thing I would say is that I have a wild theory, to apply to the puzzle in this wild book--ie. who is doing all the killing and what assumption is a dangerous assumption--and I will of course eventually learn if I'm right.

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text 2017-12-17 02:27
Reading progress update: I've read 104 out of 384 pages.
Ragdoll: A Novel - Daniel H Cole

quite a funny book, when it's not trying to disgust me or freak me out.

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text 2017-12-16 20:47
Reading progress update: I've read 62 out of 384 pages.
Ragdoll: A Novel - Daniel H Cole

intense first 60 pages. the worry is that this crazy tale will get a little too over-the-top--but I can't deny that what I've already experienced here makes it impossible to put the book down for long. splendid. wicked.

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