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review 2017-05-22 00:26
Cute Contemporary
Kiss of the Irish (Foreign Fling) - Lauren Hawkeye

After her fiance leaves her for another woman just before their wedding, Sarah Mercer decides to take a break from her life in Boston and rents a house for two months in Ireland. As soon as Cian Murphy sees the soaked American walk through his bar, he knows she’s his new tenant. He also knows there’s something sweet and irresistible about her.

This was a quick and steamy read but was a complete story. I actually really liked it. I liked following Sarah as she finds herself and is able to break away from the confines of her old life. There were a few inconsistencies in the story, but it didn’t deter from the story. I recommend for anyone looking for a quick contemporary to read.

**I voluntarily read and reviewed this book

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review 2017-05-16 03:35
Another great series
Kiss of the Irish (Foreign Fling) - Lauren Hawkeye

Sarah Mercer left Boston to get away from her life and ex fiancé to take a sabbatical in Ireland, where she meets flat and pub owner Cian Murphy. These two get to know each other and Sarah starts to realize she really didn't know herself and she likes her new self in Ireland. Will she be able to leave Cian or will she totally change her life.

Lauren Hawkeye again wrote a great story that you don't want to put down.

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review 2017-05-15 02:56
Review: Kiss of the Irish by Lauren Hawkeye
Kiss of the Irish (Foreign Fling) - Lauren Hawkeye

http://witandsin.blogspot.com/2017/05/review-kiss-of-irish-by-lauren-hawkeye.html

 

With its hot Irish hero and welcoming small town, Kiss of the Irish is the kind of story that makes you want to pack your backs and hop on a plane to Ireland posthaste. Between the idyllic environment and the engaging characters, there’s no way I could resist this book.

My favorite thing about Kiss of the Irish is the characters. Sarah has always made safe choices, done what she was told to do, and has basically been so beaten down by the people who should have loved her that she has a hard time believing in herself. Despite all of this, there’s still spark and backbone in her. When her jerk of a fiancé dumps her, Sarah leaves Boston for an extended vacation in Ceanmore, Ireland. It’s there she meets her oh-so-hot new landlord, Cian, who is a completely drool-worthy hero. He’s a smart businessman who has a bit of a wild streak, not to mention some sexy ink and piercings. But what I loved best about Cian was how genuinely kind he is. He’s got a heart of gold and while he definitely has the hots for Sarah from the start, he puts her needs first. Her self-confidence has taken a severe hit when she first comes to Ceanmore, and he helps her build herself back up. Sarah comes into her own over the course of this story, and I loved watching her grow as a character. The romance between her and Cian is equally lovely to watch unfold. They’ve got crackling good chemistry and their love story is a good mix of sweet and sensual.

Kiss of the Irish is the first book in Lauren Hawkeye’s Foreign Fling series, and by the time I finished Saran and Cian’s story, I wanted the next book. I’ve got my fingers crossed Cian’s sister, Ainsley, and her best friend, Nell, get books, because those two were utterly delightful. Their kindness and humor rounded out the story and they were as important as Cian was in bringing Sarah out of her shell. All in all, Kiss of the Irish was an utterly delightful read and I cannot wait to read more of Ms. Hawkeye’s work!


FTC Disclosure: I received this book for free from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Source: witandsin.blogspot.com/2017/05/review-kiss-of-irish-by-lauren-hawkeye.html
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review 2017-04-28 18:12
Women and appeasement
‘Guilty Women’, Foreign Policy, and Appeasement in Inter-War Britain - Julie V. Gottlieb

All too often, foreign policy has been treated as though it were exclusively the concern of men, with women usually seen either as passive participants or as secondary support. Breaking that paradigm often requires broadening the view of foreign policy formulation to take into account other, less tangible factors, such as political rhetoric, public opinion, and social encounters in which women were often able to exert influence on international relations. One such example of this was in the appeasement debates in Britain in the 1930s, in which, as Julie Gottlieb reveals in this book, women played a significant role in both the advocacy for appeasement and in the efforts to urge a stronger stance towards Nazi Germany.

 

Gottlieb's examination is divisible into three areas. The first is in the role women played in public activism. This was an area in which women enjoyed their greatest prominence, as their participation in such activities as peace movements and refugee aid organizations had long provided them with an entrée into public discussions regarding foreign affairs. By contrast their participation in electoral politics was more novel, yet here Gottlieb describes the role that women played as well, not just in terms of elected officials such as Nancy Astor, but others such as Annie Chamberlain who, while not a Member of Parliament nonetheless enjoyed a degree of public prominence and played an important role as a campaigner for her husband, Neville. Their presence proved more than symbolic, and they were seen as important conduits to the millions of recently enfranchised women, whose votes now had to be factored into the political calculus of any decision.

 

By expanding the analysis of the participants in the arguments over appeasement, Gottlieb has provided a long-overdue correction to a traditionally blinkered understanding of the participants in the contemporary debates over appeasement. While her writing can be a little dense due to her over-reliance upon jargon, she nonetheless provides an invaluable study of the development of British foreign policy in the 1930s. No future study of the subject can afford to ignore the fresh perspective she has brought to it, and hopefully it can serve as a model for similar studies that can restore women to an area of history from which that have been unjustly left out for too long.

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review 2017-04-02 15:32
"The Moscow Code" by Nick Wilkshire
The Moscow Code: A Foreign Affairs Mystery - Nick Wilkshire

Book # 2, in A Foreign Affairs Mystery

My favourite bureaucrat is back. Charlie Hillier (love this character) is eager to start his next posting. Moscow bound he comes….It doesn’t take long before he is working a fresh case….and follows the sparse clues that will bring him too close to dangerous powers that he and his client could have ever imagined ….Soon finding what happened becomes less important than getting out of the country……..

I enjoy reading Mr. Wilkshire storylines: they are a snappy quick and light read, have interesting premises and are well-written with to the point narration and clean dialogue. Most of all, the experience is very visual and cleverly entertaining.

Hillier, you have to love this guy, plays the role of a bureaucrat but is actually a likeable sleuth that is thrust into events beyond his control. Moscow is not Havana, his last gig, and the players are definitely not of the same calibre. They mostly play the game by their rules and Hillier soon finds himself at the wrong end of the stick…….

This story kept me interested from page one and I zipped through it in no time so captivated to see how Hillier would pull out of this predicament to save the day and his damsel in distress…awe… of course there has to be one…:)

I simply loved this story and can’t wait for Hillier's next assignment.

I received this ARC for review from Dundurn.com via Edelweiss

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