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review 2017-08-25 18:38
Book #857 - 344,940 Pages Read
Foreign Agent: A Thriller (The Scot Harvath Series) - Brad Thor

Another solid entry in the Harvath series by Brad Thor, this one continues Thor's mastery of writing "faction", a tough gritty story set in today's real headlines. Harvath is after a Russian terrorist hell bent on pulling the US and Russia into the Syrian conflict by carrying out terrorist acts around the world. Harvath not only has to find this guy and stop a world war, but has to battle betrayal from his own side. Thor once again pulls the reader in to a taut, exciting read to the very end. He even manages to add a more complex human side to Harvath near the end that bears watching in future novels.

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review 2017-08-11 00:39
Spy Schools: How the CIA, FBI, and Foreign Intelligence Secretly Exploit America’s Universities
Spy Schools: How the CIA, FBI, and Foreign Intelligence Secretly Exploit America's Universities - Daniel Golden

I received this book via LibraryThing's Early Reviewer program in exchange for an honest review.

 

The openness of American colleges and universities for thought and research is seen by academics as the keystone to higher education.  However Daniel Golden writes in Spy Schools: How the CIA, FBI, and Foreign Intelligence Secretly Exploit America’s Universities this is seen as opportunities to recruit agents and cultivate operatives as well steal technological innovations both by our own intelligence agencies and those across the globe.

 

Golden divided his book into foreign and domestic intelligence agencies exploitation of American universities.  The first focused how foreign agencies, mainly the Chinese, have been exploiting American universities need of prestige and tuition money to gain partnerships between Chinese universities and their American counterparts resulting in an exchange of students and professors.  Yet the most important focus of Golden’s investigation was on how the openness and collaboration within American university labs opens up opportunities for individuals to funnel research, including those paid by the U.S. government and American companies, to their home country to be exploit by their own government or to patient and start up a business.  The second half was on the complicated relationship between American intelligence agencies and universities, some of who encourage a relationship and those that do not.  The aspect of conflict between secrecy and openness is seen throughout the latter half of the book with 9/11 playing a pivotal role in each side’s views.  Unlike the first half of the book, this section is seen over the course of 60 years compared to more near 2000 but in a way to show that past is prologue.

 

As an investigative journalist, Golden uses extensive research and a multitude of interviews in giving a full history and the scale of a front in the global spy game that many in the United States haven’t been aware of.   Unfortunately for Golden the timing of this book while on the one hand current and on the other potentially dated.  Nearly all his interviews take place no later than 2015, but since the election of Donald Trump with a seemingly nativist groundswell behind him and student demonstrations against conservative speakers might have begun a fundamental shift that could drastically change how both American and foreign intelligence services are seen on American universities especially as a post-9/11 “tolerance” on campus changes to hostility.

 

Even though the subject Daniel Golden has written about could be in the midst of a sudden sea change, Spy Schools is still a book to read in at least to understand an important part of the global spy game.  Although no up-to-date, the recent and long-term history is significant for anyone who is concerned about national security and foreign intervention in American affairs.

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review 2017-05-22 00:26
Cute Contemporary
Kiss of the Irish (Foreign Fling) - Lauren Hawkeye

After her fiance leaves her for another woman just before their wedding, Sarah Mercer decides to take a break from her life in Boston and rents a house for two months in Ireland. As soon as Cian Murphy sees the soaked American walk through his bar, he knows she’s his new tenant. He also knows there’s something sweet and irresistible about her.

This was a quick and steamy read but was a complete story. I actually really liked it. I liked following Sarah as she finds herself and is able to break away from the confines of her old life. There were a few inconsistencies in the story, but it didn’t deter from the story. I recommend for anyone looking for a quick contemporary to read.

**I voluntarily read and reviewed this book

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review 2017-05-16 03:35
Another great series
Kiss of the Irish (Foreign Fling) - Lauren Hawkeye

Sarah Mercer left Boston to get away from her life and ex fiancé to take a sabbatical in Ireland, where she meets flat and pub owner Cian Murphy. These two get to know each other and Sarah starts to realize she really didn't know herself and she likes her new self in Ireland. Will she be able to leave Cian or will she totally change her life.

Lauren Hawkeye again wrote a great story that you don't want to put down.

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review 2017-05-15 02:56
Review: Kiss of the Irish by Lauren Hawkeye
Kiss of the Irish (Foreign Fling) - Lauren Hawkeye

http://witandsin.blogspot.com/2017/05/review-kiss-of-irish-by-lauren-hawkeye.html

 

With its hot Irish hero and welcoming small town, Kiss of the Irish is the kind of story that makes you want to pack your backs and hop on a plane to Ireland posthaste. Between the idyllic environment and the engaging characters, there’s no way I could resist this book.

My favorite thing about Kiss of the Irish is the characters. Sarah has always made safe choices, done what she was told to do, and has basically been so beaten down by the people who should have loved her that she has a hard time believing in herself. Despite all of this, there’s still spark and backbone in her. When her jerk of a fiancé dumps her, Sarah leaves Boston for an extended vacation in Ceanmore, Ireland. It’s there she meets her oh-so-hot new landlord, Cian, who is a completely drool-worthy hero. He’s a smart businessman who has a bit of a wild streak, not to mention some sexy ink and piercings. But what I loved best about Cian was how genuinely kind he is. He’s got a heart of gold and while he definitely has the hots for Sarah from the start, he puts her needs first. Her self-confidence has taken a severe hit when she first comes to Ceanmore, and he helps her build herself back up. Sarah comes into her own over the course of this story, and I loved watching her grow as a character. The romance between her and Cian is equally lovely to watch unfold. They’ve got crackling good chemistry and their love story is a good mix of sweet and sensual.

Kiss of the Irish is the first book in Lauren Hawkeye’s Foreign Fling series, and by the time I finished Saran and Cian’s story, I wanted the next book. I’ve got my fingers crossed Cian’s sister, Ainsley, and her best friend, Nell, get books, because those two were utterly delightful. Their kindness and humor rounded out the story and they were as important as Cian was in bringing Sarah out of her shell. All in all, Kiss of the Irish was an utterly delightful read and I cannot wait to read more of Ms. Hawkeye’s work!


FTC Disclosure: I received this book for free from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Source: witandsin.blogspot.com/2017/05/review-kiss-of-irish-by-lauren-hawkeye.html
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