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Search tags: fourth-grade
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text 2017-03-28 23:56
Bud, Not Buddy - Christopher Paul Curtis

Bud, Not Buddy was written by Christopher Paul Curtis and is the story of a little boy trying to find his place in a world where he does not know his own father. His mother died when he was younger, but he never knew his father at all. Bud grew up in the foster care system, bouncing from one foster home to the next. To Bud, it seemed as though no one would ever want him. However, this little boy has got some wits about him to be so young. He is sent to a new foster family that ends up locking him in their shed for the night. Bud’s imagination gets the best of him when he thinks there might be vampires in there, and he ends up swinging a bat at a hornet’s nest. He finds a way to bust out of the shed, torn up by multiple hornet stings, and runs away to go on his own adventure. It is quite dangerous for Bud to be striking out on his own, but he sets off on a journey to find his father. This book’s Lexile reading level is 950L, and it is recommended for students in higher grades such as fourth or fifth. One of the things that Bud constantly talks about throughout the novel is his “Rules and Things for a Funner Life”. I would want my students to brainstorm some ideas and create a list for this. However, instead of doing “Rules and Things for a Funner Life”, we could do “Rules and Things for a Funner [Classroom]”. I would read this book at the beginning of the school year with my students and we could create our classroom rules for the year based on these lists.

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text 2017-03-28 23:52
Charlotte's Web - E.B. White,Garth Williams,Rosemary Wells

A teacher can never go wrong with introducing E.B. White’s classic novel, Charlotte’s Web, to the classroom. It is the story of a little pig who is the runt of its litter but is rescued by the farmer’s daughter, Fern. She takes responsibility for the pig and decides to raise it herself. Growing ever so fond of the little pig, Fern decides to name him Wilbur. Eventually, Wilbur grows up to be a regular sized pig, but he is forced to go live at the Zuckerman’s home when Fern’s parents tell her she can no longer take care of him like a baby. Fern still visits him every day at his new farm home. On the farm, Wilbur makes many new friends, but discovers frightening news that he will be sent to the slaughterhouse by Christmas. It is up to him and his newest acquaintance, Charlotte, to save his life. Charlotte is the sweetest spider that Wilbur has ever encountered, and she plans to save his life by weaving words about Wilbur into her web. She acts not only as a friend, but also as a mother figure to Wilbur when Fern does not come and visit as often. The book’s Lexile reading level is 680L, and it is best read and understood by children in third grade and up. One activity that I want to incorporate into my classroom for this book would be a sight word spider web. We could read this book in the beginning of the school year, and create a spider web in one corner of the classroom. Throughout the year, we could add words into the web that are important sight words for the students to remember. This would be a great visual for all students!

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text 2017-03-28 23:45
The Graveyard Book - Neil Gaiman

Neil Gaiman’s novel The Graveyard Book tells the story of a little boy named Nobody Owens, or “Bod” for short, who was not raised under normal circumstances. After wandering from his crib in the middle of the night as a baby, he unknowingly escapes from a murderer in his house. The murderer is still on the loose throughout the course of the novel, and he is in search of Bod. While he is growing up, he is raised in a graveyard by ghosts who educate him on how to protect himself from the man who is out to kill him. You may be thinking by this point: why would anyone consider this to be a children’s book? Surprisingly enough, the book is an amazing story for young readers! Bod demonstrates courage throughout the novel, never allowing the man who wants to kill him to succeed with the job. The book’s Lexile reading level is 820L, and it is recommended to be read by students in higher grades like fourth and fifth grade. In my classroom, I would want students to form book groups to read the novel. I would want each student in the group to have a job to do with the book, and each group would get to engage in their own discussions about what they think. I would also want the students to analyze how Gaiman appeals to his reader’s senses through his strategic use of imagery.

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text 2017-03-25 17:46
Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing - Judy Blume

Lexile Level - 470

 

This book is about a 4th grade boy and his younger brother. Both the brother are going through school and are experiencing a lot of hard times. They have to find a way to get through them. This would be a good book to use with older grade for students to predict and solve problems. 

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review 2017-02-27 21:37
Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing
Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing - Judy Blume

Tales of a Fourth Grade nothing is a funny book about a boy and his younger brother. They experience many different experiences and trials throughout the book.

 

I think this book would be a great one to use in a literature circle for older elementary grades.

 

Lexile Level - 470

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