logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: 4-format-hardcover
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2017-12-01 17:26
The Arm - 104/368 pg
The Arm: Inside the Billion-Dollar Mystery of the Most Valuable Commodity in Sports - Jeff Passan

And yet here we are, two decades after he read The Diamond Appraised, pitchers throwing less and blowing out more. The arm confounds even the smartest people and inspires radical ideas, such as the best pitching prospect in a generation sitting out the playoffs in 2012 because maybe it would keep the arm healthy.

 

As much as I'm enjoying this, I'm going to set it aside for now, because we're starting The Hogfather buddy read and the Flat Book Society's rogue read of The Science of Discworld. I'll pick it up again when I'm done with those two, because if I have too many books going at once, I just get confused and overwhelmed. 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2017-11-30 14:41
The Arm - 62/368 pg
The Arm: Inside the Billion-Dollar Mystery of the Most Valuable Commodity in Sports - Jeff Passan

'While human's unique ability to power high-speed throws using elastic energy may have been critical in enabling early hunting, repeated overuse of this motion can result in serious injuries in modern throwers.'

Nearly one hundred years passed before anyone in baseball recognized that.

 

This book is really interesting so far, but the most fun has been with the author's ongoing skewering of the way baseball culture has embraced modern analytics for strategy but resisted science-based inquiry into better medical management and prevention.  

 

Evolution is a funny thing. The technology, the advancement, the progress - everything today reinforces the idea that we know more and are better positioned to understand the problem at hand. And maybe we are. Maybe we're closer to figuring out the arm. That doesn't take away the fact that most baseball men are still saying the exact same shit they did 75 years ago.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-11-28 19:59
The Bonesetter’s Daughter ★★★★★
The Bonesetter's Daughter - Amy Tan

Wonderfully moving story of mothers and daughters and how the way we learn to relate with our mothers can impact every other relationship we form in life. The characters grow and learn and change over the course of the story in a most satisfying way, although the author does come perilously close to an unrealistically 

Happily Ever After ending.

(spoiler show)

Alright, maybe she did it, but I enjoyed the journey so much that I didn’t mind it. I zoomed through this book in less than two days because I stayed up waaaaaay too late last night to finish it.

 

Hardcover version, has been on my bookshelf for so long I don’t even remember when or where I got it. Really 4.5 stars, rounded up to 5 because I don’t do half-stars.

 

I read this for The 16 Tasks of the Festive Season, for Square 11, December 21st-22nd: Book themes for Dōngzhì Festival: Read a book set in China or written by a Chinese author / an author of Chinese origin; or read a book that has a pink or white cover. This book is both set partly in China and the author is the daughter of Chinese immigrants to the US.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-11-21 15:15
I Am Malala ★★★★★
I Am Malala - Malala Yousafzai

I was fascinated, horrified, and inspired by this story of Malala Yousafzai, the girl who was shot in the face by the Taliban for daring to insist upon the rights of girls to an education and to criticize the Taliban for their interpretation of Islamic law with respect to women and violence. It is also the story of her much-loved father, who instilled in her the love of learning, set an example of having the courage to stand up for his principles in the face of ignorance and violence, and supported her whole-heartedly in everything she did. And it is also the story of the rise of militant Islamic fundamentalism and the Taliban in Pakistan and her beloved Swat valley, who used the tactics of would-be dictators and religious fanatics everywhere, some of which were all too familiar here in the US.

 

This is the hardcover version, which I’ve had on my bookshelf for a couple of years, waiting on my TBR. I read it for The 16 Tasks of the Festive Season, square 10: Book themes for World Peace Day: Read a book by or about a Nobel Peace Prize winner, or about a protagonist (fictional or nonfictional) who has a reputation as a peacemaker. Malala Yousafzai is the youngest Nobel Prize laureate (in 2014 at age 17) for “her struggle against the suppression of children and young people and for the right of all children to education”.

 

Previous Updates:

11/14/17 0/327 pg

I'm getting started with I Am Malala: The Story of the Girl Who Stood Up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban, which can fit both Square 10: World Peace Day (Malala Yousafzai was a co-recipient for the Nobel Peace Prize in 2014) and Square 14 Quaid-e-Azam (she is Pakistani and much of the book is about and takes place in Pakistan) for The 16 Tasks of the Festive Season. I haven't decided yet which square I'll use it for, since I don't have any alternatives for either yet. I don't have any books about any other Nobel Peace Prize winners, and my library has some unappealing options, mostly children's books. 

 

11/14/17 5/327 pg

We went to school six mornings a week, and as I was a fifteen-year-old in Year 9, my classes were spent chanting chemical equations or studying Urdu grammar, writing stories in English with morals like "haste makes waste" or drawing diagrams of blood circulation - most of my classmates wanted to be doctors. It's hard to imagine that anyone would see that as a threat.

 

11/17/17 125/327 pg

The description of how the Taliban took over the region, taking advantage of the people's anger and frustration with the legitimate government and winning their hearts through a combination of setting themselves up as the only source of truth, appealing to prejudices, and providing entertainment and charity - it's a little terrifying.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2017-11-14 18:41
I Am Malala - 5/327pg
I Am Malala - Malala Yousafzai

We went to school six mornings a week, and as I was a fifteen-year-old in Year 9, my classes were spent chanting chemical equations or studying Urdu grammar, writing stories in English with morals like "haste makes waste" or drawing diagrams of blood circulation - most of my classmates wanted to be doctors. It's hard to imagine that anyone would see that as a threat.

 

 

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?