logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: grad-school
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-11-06 03:03
I'll Give You the Sun - review
I'll Give You the Sun - Jandy Nelson

 

Noah and Jude are twins, and both very artistically inclined. This book follows the twins through some difficult times. It jumps back and forth between years and alternates between Noah and Jude's viewpoints.

 

This book deals with a lot of issues that teens might face, including questioning their sexuality, sex, death, divorce, mental health, and more. I didn't love the book, maybe because I don't usually enjoy realistic fiction. I read it for my Young Adult Literature class, and I probably wouldn't have picked it myself. But I am trying to branch out a bit.

 

Anyway, the book is well written and I can see the appeal it has for young adults. They can easily identify with the characters even if their own situation is a bit different. What bothers me about some of these stories is the romantic relationships. Books like this promote unrealistic expectations about love and relationships. Most of us don't find our "soulmate" (if one even exists), and we don't often experience a love that was "meant to be." Sad I know, but it seems worse to make teens think that this is how love works. 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-11-06 02:30
Wintergirls - review
Wintergirls - Laurie Halse Anderson

 

Wow. This book is relentless, intense, and depressing...

That being said, it also seems realistic. It chronicles Lia's descent into anorexia and self-harm. Her best friend was bulemic and has died at the beginning of the book. She tried to call Lia multiple times on the night she died, but Lia didn't answer. The guilt Lia feels contributes to her decline. She has been in and out of treatment and knows how to fool the system. Her mother, father, and stepfather don't know how to reach her or what to do to help her anymore. How do you help someone who is determined to hurt themselves?

 

This book is a difficult read and not for the faint of heart. I didn't enjoy it at all, but I did learn from it and I do see the value in it. Thus my 3 star review. Anderson describes what Lia looks like and what she does to her body in graphic detail. So, beware.

 

I think this could be a good book for teens or their parents to read. Teens may see themselves and see hope or realize what could happen to them. Adults can see the pressures that today's teens face on a daily basis. I think books about these issues are important when they show the whole situation in a realistic light. Anderson does an amazing job of getting inside Lia's head and showing us her thought process.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-10-17 04:26
This One Summer
This One Summer - Jillian Tamaki,Mariko Tamaki

 

Rose and Windy have been coming to the same beach every summer for years. Rose is a bit older and is starting to change into a young woman while Windy is still a girl. They have a sisterly relationship and enjoy their summers together. Rose is experiencing family strife and trying to figure out who she is as a young woman. Windy is still happy-go-lucky. 

 

This graphic novel is based in summer fun, but there are a lot of serious issues going on here. Rose's parents are dealing with infertility and loss. The young man who works at the local store may have gotten his girlfriend pregnant. The older kids curse and talk about sex. This is not a story for younger readers. I think the appropriate age depends on your individual beliefs, but I would say high school.

 

I found the hyperness of Windy a bit irritating and I didn't love the book. But I can see that it is well-written and will appeal to many teens and young adults. I read this book for my Young Adult literature class. :)

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-08-12 19:39
It Ain't So Awful Falafel
It Ain't So Awful, Falafel - Firoozeh Dumas

 

To all the kids who don't belong, for whatever reason.

This one's for you.

- Dedication

 

My dad says that the dogs and cats in America are luckier than most people in the world.

- page 34

 

My dad always says that kindness is our religion and if we treat everybody the way we would like to be treated, the world would be a better place.

- page 40

 

... only bookworms get excited over other bookworms

- page 69

 

"Who would ever have thought that a person could be so powerful, then so completely powerless, all in the same lifetime?"

- page 219 (referring to the downfall of the shah)

 

... even though we belong to three different religions. We are alike in so many more ways than we are different.

- page 299

 

It was only when I stopped pretending to be someone else that I found my real friends.

- page 360

 

 

This was a good read. Zomorod (who changes her name to Cindy) is from Iran. Her father is an engineer who works with American companies building oil refineries in Iran, so they moved back and forth a couple of times.  Now she is starting junior high (which nowadays is called middle school) and doesn't know anyone. She wants to fit in, but she focuses on how different she is from all the other kids. The first friend she makes (in the summer before school) decides she doesn't want to be friends when school starts. Poor "Cindy" is lost and worried and tired of having to explain to everyone where Iran is and how to pronounce her last name.

 

Cindy finds friends and seems to be settling in and basically happy. Then Iran has a revolution, the shah is kicked out of the country, and Ayatollah Khomeini takes over. On November 4, 1979, Iranian students, angry that President Carter allowed the shah to come to the United States, take a group of Americans hostage. This changes Cindy's family's life and her father loses his job.

 

I was in junior high during the Iran Hostage Crisis. I remember feeling vaguely angry at the hostage takers and worried about the hostages. My mom wasn't huge on watching the news with us or anything, but I knew what was happening (at least generally).  

 

It was interesting reading this story told from the point of view of an Iranian girl in America at the time. It was so hard for Cindy's family, and many Americans were so hostile towards Iranians, even though those living in America weren't responsible for the situation and didn't necessarily approve of it. Cindy and her parents were so appalled that a religious leader could be responsible for such behavior. But that didn't save them from hate and discrimination.

 

This is a nominee for the Florida Sunshine State award grades 3-5. I really liked the book and will highly recommend it to our students when school starts. 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-07-31 04:27
Coral Reefs
Science Comics: Coral Reefs: Cities of the Ocean - Maris Wicks

 

 

The Science Comics series uses the graphic novel format to inform kids (and adults) about popular topics. In this case, the topic is coral reefs. The narrator is a sassy yellow goby fish who explains the facts about coral reefs and their inhabitants. There is a wealth of information in this book, and it may be a bit much for younger kids. Then again, if they are interested in the subject, kids can remember a surprising number of facts. The illustrations are bright and beautiful, and labeled diagrams are provided to help explain the facts. In the back of the book, readers will find a glossary, bibliography, and a list of additional resources. The book also gives information about conservation and real examples of what kids can do to help.

 

The book was a fun read and I learned a lot about coral reefs. 

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?