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text 2018-01-19 17:23
Tea's TBR Thursday - January 18, 2018
Sweethearts And Jazz (A 1940's Romance Book 2) - Rose Andrews
Dialing Dreams: A short story - Jessica Eissfeldt
Allegiance: A Dublin Novella - Heather Domin

*bookish meme created by Moonlight Reader

 

This has been a week - and we are still waiting for a certain federal shoe to drop. Anyway, that is why I am late with this bookish meme. Apologies.

 

Books Read from TBR:

1. The Good Girls Revolt by Lynn Povich

2. Dark Tide by Stephen Puleo

3. The Little Book of Hygge by Meik Wiking

4. Triangle by David von Drehle

5. A Right Honorable Gentleman by Courtney Milan

6. Ms. Marvel Volume 1 by G. Willow Wilson et al

 

Books Borrowed/On Hold from Library: Nothing. That will change soon, as there are a few books on my COYER list coming from OverDrive.

 

Books added to the TBR:

1. Sweethearts and Jazz by Rose Andrews - post WWII historical romance set in the world of regional/dinner theater.

 

2. Dialing Dreams by Jessica Eissfeldt - WWII historical romance between a military member and a hotel telephone switchboard operator (my copy's cover looks very different from the one showing).

 

3. Allegiance: A Dublin Novella by Heather Domin - a m/m historical romance set in Ireland in early 1920s between a British MI5 agent and an Irish rebel.

 

All three additions were from the free section of the NOOK store.

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text 2017-11-21 17:37
You think you have the blues? Nein, das hatte Billie Holiday.

 

Billie Holiday, eine der größten Jazzsängerinnen, die jemals gelebt hat, erzählt ihre Geschichte in ihren eigenen Worten: Ihre Armutserfahrung in der Kindheit, das Leben als schwarze Frau vor der Bürgerrechtsbewegung und ihre persönlichen Suchtkämpfe spiegeln sich in der unglaublichen Klangfarbe und Tiefe ihrer unverwechselbaren Stimme wider.

 

Wir alle haben es in ihrer Musik gespürt, aber Fans werden es genießen, mehr über die Geschichte dieser musikalischen Legende zu erfahren. Eine gute Biographie oder Autobiografie ist ein bisschen wie Blues: Sie scheut sich nicht vor den Schmerzen, die das Leben begleiten und verliert trotz allem nie den Sinn für das Schöne und Erhabene.

 

Für alle, die dem November-Blues kreativ entkommen wollen, empfehlen wir „Lady Sings the Blues“ oder eine andere inspirierende Lebensgeschichte aus unserer Kollektion: http://bit.ly/2jdSHVb

 

 

 

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review 2017-05-31 15:27
Eddie Izzard's memoir
Believe Me: A Memoir of Love, Death, and Jazz Chickens - Eddie Izzard

Disclaimer: ARC via Netgalley

                Back when BBC America show actually British shows instead of movies and Star Trek, I saw my first Eddie Izzard show.

 

                He made me laugh so hard.

 

                To call this book a straight forward autobiography or memoir is slightly incorrect.  While the progression in the work is somewhat linear, there are digressions, and in some places, you go two steps back after one step forward.

 

                This doesn’t mean the book is bad.  It isn’t.  In fact, it is like Izzard is there talking just to you.  So, it is really nice.

 

                The other thing is that Izzard is not one of those stars who celebrate or shoves his celebrity in his face.  He does not make himself sound extra special or anything like that.  He is, in fact, every day, everybody.  So, when he discusses his struggles to come to terms with himself, to find himself, to succeed, he is in many ways just like you.  Look, I don’t know what it is like to be transgender or TV as Eddie Izzard calls it.  Yet, for a straight woman who doesn’t like to wear heels, there is much here.  Izzard’s writing lacks that self-inflation that sometimes infuses memoirs.  In part, the book feels like he is still trying to figure himself out, and on another level, it gives me the same feeling that reading Pancakes in Paris did.  Everyone struggles to discover who they are and make peace with it.  Most struggles are different yet similarly.  (Yes, I know it is oxymoron).

 

                There are funny insights here too – for instance “Wasps are actually like The Borg from Star Trek” or how real football is more American than people think it is.  “Stinging nettles are the Nazis of the  weed world”.

 

                And he is so right about warm milk.  Warm milk is just wrong in so many different ways.

 

                And Mr. Izzard, you are not the only vomiter, just saying.

 

                The book isn’t just humor – though Izzard’s humor is on full display, it is full of introspection and touching passages.  When Izzard discusses his relationship to his step-mother, in particular his attending concerts with her, the emotion shines though.   It is a rather intimate and touching story.

 

                Even if you are not an Eddie Izzard fan (and you should be), you will enjoy this touching memoir.

               

               

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review 2017-05-18 02:19
Jazz Baby - Beem Weeks

            Before I began reading this book I was warned that it was “gritty.” That was the exact word used. And the person who generously cautioned me was telling no lie.  Oftentimes the story of the maturing Baby Teegarten made me cringe and my stomach churn.  It had nothing to do with Beem Weeks’ writing style, but rather with the brutality young women were faced with during the 1920s.

            The first person perspective allows readers to face Baby’s harrowing journey to making it big in a society that demeans girls and views them as commodities rather than human beings.  Beem Weeks writes about broken dreams and the crushing weight of circumstance.  While Baby has a vision of making it big in the northern United States, desperate for an escape from barren Mississippi, she is cut short and settles for the dark world of New Orleans speak easies.  The real tragedy of the tale is that the summation of all the horrible events Baby experiences reflects the desperation some feel to escape, whether they are escaping a regrettable past or a home that never felt like home. 

            While I can’t say that this is a book I would read again, Beem Weeks’ writing skill is undeniable.  I tend to prefer romance and stories that take me on an emotional journey that end in me ultimately feeling fulfilled and happy.  When I finished this story I mostly felt dirty.  But to accurately depict the tale of his protagonist, the author had no other way but to include those details for the sake of authenticity and perhaps even shock value. Returning to that warning I was given—Jazzy Baby was a chilling and indubitably gritty approach to a coming of age story.

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