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review 2018-06-19 05:58
Power Places and the Master Builders of Antiquity: Unexplained Mysteries of the Past by Frank Joseph
Power Places and the Master Builders of Antiquity: Unexplained Mysteries of the Past - Joseph Frank

TITLE:  Power Places and the Master Builders of Antiquity: Unexplained Mysteries of the Past

 

AUTHOR:  Frank Joseph

 

DATE PUBLISHED:  2018

 

FORMAT:  Paperback

 

ISBN-13:  9781591433132

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This book is an extremely superficial collection of chapters about individial oddball topics - everything from pyramids in China to unexpla artifacts/buildings in the America's, Templar mysteries, today's megalith builders, remote viewing, power places, a random collection of interesting personalities, alteres mental states, interviews with unusual people and strange natural occurences.  This book is not nearly so well written as other books that I have read by Frank Joseph.  The topics are not covered well enough to provide anything other than a few tantilizing glimpses of mystery.  There is also a lack of rigorous research.  In several cases we only have the author's interview with the subject to go on.  Several of the subjects covered in this book are familiar to me, but I did find found some topics (usually the longer chapters) interesting.

If you are new to this sort of subject or just wish to read something in chapter size pieces, then this book may be of interest to you.  If, on the other hand, you are familiar with the mysteries of antiquity and some unexplained mysteries, you might not find any meat in this book.

 


OTHER SIMILAR BOOKS

- Worlds Before Our Own - Brad Steiger
- The Giza Power Plant - Christopher Dunn
- The History of Atlantis - Lewis Spence
- Atlantis Beneath the Ice - Rose and Rand Flem-Ath
- Forbidden History - J. Douglas Kenyon
- History's Mysteries - Brian Haughton
- The Lost Treasure of King Juba - Frank Joseph
- Advanced Civilizations of Prehistoric America - Frank Joseph

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review 2018-03-19 16:32
Gap into Vision / Stephen R. Donaldson
The Gap Into Vision: Forbidden Knowledge - Stephen R. Donaldson

Beautiful, brilliant, and dangerous, Morn Hyland is an ex-police officer for the United Mining Companies--and the target of two ruthless, powerful men.  One is the charismatic ore-pirate Nick Succorso, who sees Morn as booty wrested from his vicious rival, Angus Thermopyle.  thermopyle once made the mistake of underestimating Morn and now he's about to pay the ultimate price.  Both men think they can possess her, but Morn is no one's trophy--and no one's pawn.

Meanwhile, withing the borders of Forbidden Space, wait the Amnioin, an alien race capable of horrific atrocities.  The Amnion want something unspeakable from humanity--and they will go to unthinkable lengths to get it.

 

Although this is the first series by Donaldson that I can stand to read, I still can’t say that I love it. I’m not sure that I even like it. There really isn’t one character that I can actually identify with—there are one or two that I’m interested in and want to know what happens to them, but I can’t say that I like them. Mind you, that’s not necessary for a novel but it does make it easier reading.

The aliens in this universe seem to take a cue from Octavia Butler’s Oankali in her Xenogenesis series. Donaldson’s Amnioin also seem to be rather echinoderm-like and are interested in acquiring humans for genetic purposes. Selling someone to the Amnioin is seen as the ultimate evil in human trafficking. But when there’s money to be made, you know that some human is going to try to make deals with them—and it’s rather like trying to make deals with the Fae. You need to watch your wording and make sure you know all of the ramifications before you sign on the dotted line.

If you’ve got any issues with rape scenes, you won’t have made it past the first book. That said, don’t expect that to stop in this book. Morn actually has to go to sick-bay at one point, to get repaired after particularly rough treatment by Nick Succorso. Donaldson doesn’t go into graphic detail, thankfully, but there are more than enough hints to be horrifying.

The cynicism evident in the book is a bit depressing too—everyone seems to be on the take somehow, even the police force that Morn used to belong to. She followed her parents into that occupation and had taken pride in their upstanding reputation—this is yet another thing that gets taken away from her, along with her personal agency.

Book 275 in my Science Fiction and Fantasy reading project.

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text 2018-03-15 15:20
TBR Thursday
Birding Without Borders: An Obsession, a Quest, and the Biggest Year in the World - Noah Strycker
Now I Rise (The Conqueror's Trilogy) - Kiersten White
Dear Fahrenheit 451: Love and Heartbreak in the Stacks - Annie Spence
The Shoe on the Roof - Will Ferguson
The Gap Into Vision: Forbidden Knowledge - Stephen R. Donaldson
My Brief History - Stephen Hawking

Actually, this is just a fraction of my library book pile, but they are the ones that I'm going to concentrate on for the next week or so.

 

Three of them have holds on them, so they can't be renewed--Birding Without Borders, Dear Fahrenheit 451, and The Shoe on the Roof.  The subject matter of the three couldn't be more different, so it should be an interesting week.

 

Now I Rise is the second book in The Conqueror's Saga.  The first book, And I Darken, is the book for April in my real-life book club.  I read that one last year, so I'm going to forge ahead into the second book before our meet up on April 6.

 

It seems appropriate to read Stephen Hawking's autobiography, My Brief History, to celebrate the great man's life. 

 

And Gap Into Vision : Forbidden Knowledge is the next up in my Science Fiction & Fantasy Reading Project.  I'm glad to have finally found a series by Stephen R. Donaldson that I actually kind of like.

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review 2017-12-26 23:23
A Little Knowledge by Emma Newman
A Little Knowledge: The Split Worlds - Book Four - Emma Newman

Series: Split Worlds #4

 

More hijinks and suspense with the Fae and others and well-meaning characters acting at cross purposes. I was almost tempted to dive into the last one right away but I think I'll read a couple other things first. 

 

I'm counting this for the Advent book for 16 Festive Tasks "read the 4th book from a favorite series".

 

Previous Updates:

28%

1%

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text 2017-12-21 04:21
Reading progress update: I've read 28%.
A Little Knowledge: The Split Worlds - Book Four - Emma Newman

She'd left the shop with a bag full of books for her new library, including a hardback with crossed flintlocks on the cover that a random woman in the shop had gushed about. 

 

I see Newman is plugging Adrian Tchaikovsky's Guns of the Dawn. I still need to read that. She's also the audio version's narrator.

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