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review 2018-03-23 21:06
What It Looks Like by Matthew J. Metzger Review
What It Looks Like - Matthew J. Metzger

Eli Bell is the only son of a police chief inspector and a forensic scientist. He's grown up wonky in a world that only deals with the straight and narrow -- and his new boyfriend isn't helping.

Rob Hawkes is six feet of muscle, tattoos, and arrest warrants. A career criminal and a former tenant of Her Majesty's Prison Service, he'd rather hit Eli's parents than sit down to dinner with them. One wrong move, and Rob could destroy Eli -- and his family -- without a second thought.

But this isn't what it looks like.

Rob's not in control here -- and Eli's the one to blame.




This book is a bit of a wild ride. Both Rob and Eli have explosive tempers. They fight. With each other and in Eli's case with his family members. 

There are class difference and some star crossed issue to clear up. The BDSM parts were a bit intense for me but I bought into the love between the heroes.

The portions of the book that dealt with transgender identify and family emotionially connected as did the discussion of police and public relations. 

The resolution to the conflicts was a bit over the top but in here is tucked a pretty good love story.

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review 2018-03-23 07:22
The Book Worm
The Book Worm - Mitch Silver

I was riveted during the prologue, but the author almost lost me completely on pages 7 and 8; anyone inclined to read this book should skip those pages.  Nothing of consequence happens, and you'll be left with a mental image you'll never be able to unsee.  


So given all that love and nausea happening before page 10, I was unsure of what the rest of the book was going to bring.  Fortunately, the story evened out for the better.  I went back to being lost in what is a fabulously decadent 'what if' fantasy of old school East vs. West.  There are a lot of names dropped in this tale: Noël Coward, Marlene Dietrich, the Kennedys, even Ian Flemming.  It was pure, escapist fun. 


Unfortunately, Silver didn't quite stick the landing.  He created an intensely intricate plot, but didn't give himself (or the publisher didn't give him) the pages to fully realise it.  The result is a somewhat rushed and muddy climax that falls a little flat for lack of, and I can't believe I'm saying this, drama.  I love what he wanted to do with it, but given more time and attention it could have been a breath-taking scene and that scene deserved the extra time and attention.  Instead, it ended up being not much more than someone yelling "Fire" in a theatre.  Finally, the last half dozen lines in the book should have been deleted. They were ridiculous, and of all the unrealistic things that happen in this book, they are by far, the most implausible.  


This author is not without talent; I was enthralled for 75% of this book and it was, in spite of its shortcomings, a fun and entertaining read.



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review 2018-03-18 18:00
Poster Boy (Theta Alpha Gamma #5) by Anne Tenino Review
Poster Boy - Anne Tenino

t's all fun and games until someone puts his heart out.

After being outed to his hockey team and then changing schools, Jock figures he’s due for something good — like the sex he missed out on in the closet. Toby, the hot grad student he meets at a frat party, seems like a great place to start, and their night together is an awesome introduction to the fine art of hooking up.

Toby’s heart takes a bruising after the near-perfect experience with Jock leads to . . . nothing. He’s been left on the outside as his friends pair up into blissful coupledom, and he’s in danger of never completing (or starting) his thesis. Can’t something go right?

Then Toby’s coerced into chaperoning a Theta Alpha Gamma trip to France. Not that he’s complaining. What better place to finish his thesis and get over that frat boy? Except Jock’s outing is leaked to the press, turning him into an unwilling gay rights martyr, and he decides France would be a great escape, too. It’s a break from reality for both guys, but they soon find their connection is as real as it gets.




 have enjoyed this series and Toby's and Jock's romance makes an intersting addition.

Toby in previous books has been kind of hard to read. We get in this book that he feels kind of plain and not that valuable. His fetish of more "virginal" guys isn't well explored but we do get a lot more insight into who he is. He grows a great deal in this book and I end up liking him a great deal. 

Jock is a bit of a mess. Young and self centered. Jock hooks up briefly with Toby and is pretty rude really about the whole thing. It means more to Toby or at least Jock isn't ready to have it mean anything. 

They end up in France together. Jock is terrified on emotionial intimacy and has all sorts of internalized homophobia to deal with. Toby takes all kinds of emotionial risks that I am not always sure the Jock deserves. But it ends up a sweet love story in the end and Jock really sorts his stuff out in a very satisfying way and Toby learns his true calling. Good stuff. 

I love the surprise secondary romance, the madcap frat boys, setting, and the history.

I hope Noah gets his own book.

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review 2018-03-18 05:12
The Uncommon Reader
The Uncommon Reader - Alan Bennett

A short novella on the joys, growth and enlightenment reading can bring, even to the most enlightened, at any time in life.  It's also an accurate portrayal of the consuming obsession reading can become (truth, as we all well know).  


Layered atop this testimony of the power of the word is another accurate portrayal of the divide that exists between those who read and those that don't.  Those who don't read should be forced to read this book, so that they know just how stupid they are relative to those that do.  When empathy for others and a focus on inner reflection over sartorial splendour are confused with senility and deterioration ... well at least senility is honourable; nothing honourable about ignorance.  But boy, do the readers get their revenge at the end - few books I've read ended with a better closing line.


My only complaint about this wonderful, brilliant little book is the author's conclusion that the natural outgrowth of reading must be to write.  This conceit leaves a rather large ding in my enjoyment of the book.  So is his assertion that to merely read is to be merely a spectator.  Both are flagrantly wrong, although how an author could naturally fall into such a self-supporting perspective is obvious.  Most readers will read their entire lives without every having a moment's urge to write, and I'd bet quite a few, like myself, often read and then go out and do.  I mean, I can't be the only person who's propped a book about knot tying in the crook of a tree, simultaneously reading about how to tie a knot, while actually trying to tie said knot, am I?


If you share either of my complaints, don't let it stop you from reading this book given the opportunity.  It's worth the small aggravations and disagreements to experience this charming, thoughtful and beautifully written novella.  


One final note:  Being Queen would suck.  There are not enough books and private libraries in all the holdings of the British monarchy that would make referring always to oneself in the neutral third person worth it.  If one had to constantly refer to oneself as one, one would send oneself's own head to the chopping block.  Ho-ly hell.

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review 2018-03-17 17:48
There's Something About Ari (Bluewater Bay #2) by L.B. Gregg Review
There's Something About Ari - L.B. Gregg

Buck Ellis’s future seems pretty damn bright. With a full college scholarship in hand, he’s going to ditch Bluewater Bay and pave the way for his kid brother Charlie to do the same. The only fly in Buck’s ointment is his ten-year addiction to his best friend since second grade, his true love, and his Achilles heel: Ari Valentine, Mr. Least Likely to Succeed.

But then Buck’s mother dies, changing everything, and five years later, his future is still on hold. It’s a struggle to keep food on the table, a roof over their heads, and Charlie on the straight and narrow. Buck can’t afford any temptation, especially in the form of the newly returned, super hot, super confident, super successful television star Ari Valentine.

ADHD poster-child Ari Valentine left for Hollywood and lost everything, including his bad reputation. Then the breakthrough role of his skyrocketing career lands him back in Bluewater Bay, to the stunned disbelief of, well, everyone. But there’s only one person Ari longs to impress — the only person who ever really mattered to him, the person he left behind: Buck Ellis.



I was really enjoying this book and then when the best part was coming when they were really really going to talk and be together, it ended. Bah. I hate that.


Buck is gruff, socially awkward, uncommunicative. LOL and yet protective and lovable

Ari left him at the worst possible moment because of his own crap. They were young and a mess and this all makes sense.


Now, Ari is back. He want Buck. Buck is being difficult.


The best scenes for me are the ones from their childhood friendship. I want this closeness after they get together for real and well more hot sexy times.


Gregg can really write but I want fully finished stories.

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