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review 2018-07-16 21:50
Do Not Open This Math Book
Do Not Open This Math Book - Danica McKellar
I really enjoyed this beginning math/subtraction book. Although geared towards elementary children, I think this book has potential for anyone struggling with the basics of addition and subtraction. Working with students from kindergarten through 6th grade and some struggling adult learners, I think this book is a gem.
 
What makes this book fantastic in my eyes, is the way the concepts are presented. There are great visuals displaying the information and fantastic ideas to help bring the concepts to life. Danica’s language that she uses to get her point across in this book is fabulous. I found this book entertaining and educational, and although some concepts she builds upon immediately, sometimes she leaves a concept and later comes back to it adding to it.
 
From adding basic numbers together to subtracting two-digit number, Danica shows how to do that visually and by reading this text, it seems as if she’s right there beside you. There’s a cute, little mouse as Danica sidekick in the book, who is reluctant to learn but with Danica’s help, he starts to learn and is successful.
 
There is a section on place value, fact families, mental math, regrouping, and then subtracting with borrowing. Like I mentioned before, she starts out basic and moves into more complex material but it’s a gradual shift. The books language is positive and in reading the book, it’s as if you had your own teacher right there with you explaining the concepts. I think using this book with a child would be very beneficial and for children who can read, the ability for them to work through this book on their own would be valuable and an accomplishment. There are games, exercises and lots of examples inside this book.
 
Thank you, Danica, for creating this book, what a terrific book teaching these concepts. I highly recommend checking out this book.
 
Excerpt: (how readable and positive the book’s language is) “Just so you know, the whole point in moving the buns to “fill in a tin” is so we can turn these problems into the easy ones we saw on the chart on page 26, like 10 + 5 = 15 and 10 + 6 + 16. By filling the tins wherever we can, we’ll be making the problems easy, like magic.”

 

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review 2018-07-14 16:57
Lost In Math
Lost in Math: How Beauty Leads Physics Astray - Sabine Hossenfelder

[I received a copy of this book from NetGalley.]

I can’t say for sure that I understood everything in this book, since my knowledge of physics in general is very patchy, but overall, I liked its tone, and its global idea, because I can get why one would be easily led astray by theories that look ‘beautiful’. It’s something that I feel is very human, after all, as we often look for a form of harmony in the world surrounding us, if only to try and make sense of it. Perhaps the fundamental, underlying laws of nature don’t make that much sense, or don’t always look like they do, and so we try to understand them in ways that would reconcile us with an apparent lack of… meaning, maybe? But what if the theories we pursue, albeit ‘pretty’ and nicely wrapped, turn out to be wrong? Shall we keep pursuing those, in the hopes that we just haven’t seen proof yet due to technological limitations, for instance? It seems that the answer to this isn’t so clear-cut. (The LHC being a good example. I’m tremendously excited by the LHC, and what it allowed to prove so far… but while we got the Higgs boson, we still haven’t gotten supersymmetry.)

The book also gave me pointers about things of which I clearly don’t know enough, especially in order to understand where the author comes from, so I know I’ll have to focus on those at some point in order to learn more.

As a side note, I don’t know, but I don’t feel particularly bothered by the ‘ugliness’ of the Standard Model. It may be in part because all I know about it, I learnt on my own, without following the regular cursus, so I never approached it with any specific idea in mind? We’ll see once I’ve studied more.

Conclusion: Definitely interesting, although don’t approach it if you know next to nothing to physics, since some ideas won’t make sense otherwise.

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review 2018-07-09 07:14
Lost in Math by Sabine Hossenfelder
Lost in Math: How Beauty Leads Physics Astray - Sabine Hossenfelder

TITLE:  Lost in Math:  How Beauty Leads Physics Astray

 

AUTHOR:  Sabine Hossenfelder

 

PUBLICATION DATE:  12 June 2018

 

FORMAT:  ARC ebook

 

ISBN-13:  9780465094257

_______________________________

NOTE: I received an Advanced Readers Copy of this book from NetGalley. This review is my honest opinion of the book.

_______________________________

 

Book Description:

"Most physicists think of beauty as the royal road to discovery; a leading critic shows it is instead the road to nowhere.
Whether pondering black holes or predicting discoveries at CERN, physicists believe the best theories are beautiful, natural, and elegant, and this standard separates popular theories from disposable ones. This is why, Sabine Hossenfelder argues, we have not seen a major breakthrough in the foundations of physics for more than four decades. The belief in beauty has become so dogmatic that it now conflicts with scientific objectivity: observation has been unable to confirm mindboggling theories, like supersymmetry or grand unification, invented by physicists based on aesthetic criteria. Worse, these "too good to not be true" theories are actually untestable and they have left the field in a cul-de-sac. To escape, physicists must rethink their methods. Only by embracing reality as it is can science discover the truth.
"

________________________________________

 

Lost in Math is the story of how aesthetic judgement drives contemporary research; how theoretical physicists produce ideas that are "highly controversial and yet exceedingly popular, speculative yet intriguing, pretty yet useless"; and how these theories are untestable but the physicist believes them to be too good not to be true.  

In the past, scientists observed the world around them and performed experiments.  Then they developed theories to explain these observations.  These theories would then be tested against addition observations and experiments.  These days, theoretical physicists (especially in particle physics) concoct theories that are only supported by beautiful mathematics, and which can never be confirmed by experiments or which are unlikely (due to cost and difficulty) to be examined experminentally.

In an effort to find out what went wrong with theoretical physics, Hossenfelder interviews several physicists and takes a look at the current popular physics theories.  The author makes a convincing case that this reliance on the beauty/maths-only criteria to determine which theories to study and promote has resulted in a lack of progress in certain physics fields.  In the author's own words, "in the end the only way to find out which theory is correct is to check whether it describes nature; non-empirical theory assessment will not do it".  

The writing style of this book is conversational and accessible (for the most part - just pretend the physics is Star Trek physics), and the topic covered is important not only for physicists.  I did find the physics explanations somewhat baffling but then most of the physicists interviewed state that no-one understands quantum physic.  However, this book is a book about how physicists work, not about the physics itself, so it didn't matter much.  I found this book to be interesting and informative.

 

 

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review 2018-06-23 19:08
Implausifiability in Physics: “Lost in Math - How Beauty Leads Physics Astray” by Sabine Hossenfelder
Lost in Math: How Beauty Leads Physics Astray - Sabine Hossenfelder


“The time it takes to test a new fundamental law of nature can be longer than a scientist’s career. This forces theorists to draw upon criteria other than empirical adequacy to decide which research avenues to pursue. Aesthetic appeal is one of them. In our search for new ideas, beauty plays many roles. It’s a guide, a reward, a motivation. It is also a systematic bias“

In “Lost in Math - How Beauty Leads Physics Astray” by Sabine Hossenfelder



One of the most obnoxious notions I’ve ever read in Physics is the one that purports that we’re a simulation. If it's all a simulation, why wouldn't the world that simulated us be a simulation too? This is the turtles all the way down idea. This doesn't mean it isn't true but it's also the same question as, if God created the universe and us, who created God? The answer I sometimes get when I say it’s all hogwash, is that the theory is aesthetically pleasing. Where is the evidence? And more importantly, is it “implausifiable” (I’m borrowing here Hossenfelder’s term)? The supposed evidence for our universe being a simulation seems to largely include the idea that if we extrapolate our technological progress further ahead in time, we will be able to build such a simulation ourselves *therefore* we are a simulation.

 

If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review.

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url 2018-06-04 06:54
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