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review 2018-02-16 00:46
Smart fantasy knows revolution is the easy answer, not the right one
Palace of Stone - Shannon Hale

Another wonderful YA fantasy suitable for younger readers.


Miri and company leave the mountain to attend their friend's wedding in the capital and discover the country has some serious trouble brewing. The king is out of touch and careless, his nobles are abusing the commoners, and a bloody revolution is brewing in the background. But Miri's there to learn, and at the royal academy, she struggles with the study and true practice of how to determine, and how to act on, right and wrong.


The answer is complicated, and that's part of what makes this writing stand out. In 2018, we're all about fierce, take charge girls being savage and taking down the patriarchy and Nazis and whatever else is doing damage. And we need to call out the abuse of power and the suffering of the powerless and other evils. But, as the head scholar points out to Miri, history shows that revolutions generally involve a lot of murder, a lot of purposeless blood spilt, and much less progress toward their glorious ideals than they were meant to. Understanding, finding a connecting point, and persuading others to reassess their positions is much more effective in taking steps towards a more just outcome.


This story explores the emotions and thoughts of the characters as they confront difficult realities in a believable, relatable way. It's somewhat utopian - the crafted plot of a story allows for neat turns and unlikely defusing of volatile situations - but it reminds us to value people and choose the hardest path, the one where we don't just get to tear down what we hate, but rather have to find a way forward and build a better future for everyone. It's smart, considered, enjoyable, and inspiring writing.

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review 2017-07-19 23:01
Recommended to those who enjoy action novels, spy novels, thrillers, and definitely to Baldacci fans.
Zero Day - David Baldacci

Thanks to NetGalley and to the publisher, MacMillan, for offering me an ARC copy of this book that I freely chose to review.

David Baldacci is one of these authors whose names a reader (and even a non-reader) cannot escape. His books are widely distributed and he always seems to have a volume or two in the bestsellers list (no, not the Amazon one on a little-known genre, but the real thing). Despite all that (or perhaps because of it, as sometimes some names seem so familiar that I feel as if I had already read/watched or whatever it is they do, them before) I had never read any of his books. I saw that coinciding with a book launch, NetGalley was offering a copy of the first book in the John Puller series, and I decided perhaps it was time I read him. (I don’t have any specific opinions on best sellers as such and I don’t necessarily avoid them as a matter of principle but I do prefer to discover them early on, so I can make my own mind up).

The story, narrated in the third person, mostly follows John Puller, a military investigator that is all you probably would wish for in such a character. He has complex family relations (including a genius brother imprisoned for life for treason), he has seen his share of combat and has the medals and the scars to prove them, he is as skilled at fighting as he is at investigating, and although usually he works as part of a team, he can be a one-man-band when required (as is the case here).  There are some moments (like the first chapter) when we follow other characters, but this is for a very good reason, and we, by and far, experience the events from Puller’s perspective. Of course, that does not mean we know everything he knows, because the book hides information at times and that means there are some surprises (the number of surprises might depend on how close your attention and on how many books of the genre you have read).  The story is a combination of a spy story with highly skilled military investigator/hero in charge, and a more standard police procedural, with big secrets, conspiracies, and environmental issues thrown in for good measure. There are hints of a possible romance, but nobody is up to the task, and the time frame is very tight for such developments.

The investigation is very detailed, and we get to know quite a few of the characters in the small West Virginian town of Drake, a coal mining place that has become almost a ghost town due to the environmental and economic consequences of the exploitation and depletion of its resources by the sole industry in the area. Baldacci shares as much loving detail on the way the coal industry works (or at least some far-from-exemplary companies), as he does on everything else: the way the military works, the different roles of the investigating and security agencies and how they interact, the equipment used, the weaponry… This might be too much for some readers, but I am sure it will make others very happy. I did enjoy more the discussions of the environmental issues and the socio-economic effects of the coal-extracting industry than the details about the equipment, but there is plenty of action and intrigue to keep readers of mystery, and also spy novels, entertained.

My favourite character is Sam Cole, the female police officer in charge of the investigation. She has problems of her own and also a difficult relationship with her family, and seems the perfect match for Puller. I would probably have preferred the novel to be about her, but that is not the genre or the focus of it. In many ways, her character is the one that makes us see Puller as something more than a perfect fighting and investigating machine, all professional, and efficient. Yes, he has a cat, some sort of relationships with his father, and an interesting dynamic with his brother, but she is the only person who is not a relative he seems to relate to at a level beyond the casual, and it is not only because it is helpful to his mission.  

I agree with comments that the novel is formulaic in many ways (Puller survives several attempts on his life, has to subvert orders and get inventive to save the day and manages to pull an incredible feat at the end), although as I haven’t read other Baldacci’s books, I cannot comment on how much better or worse Puller is compared to some of his other heroes (Reacher is mentioned often in the reviews, sometimes agreeing he’s as good, others denying it). I imagine once you have such a following as an author, you know what your public wants and expects, so it is perhaps disingenuous to accuse him of writing to a formula. It is not a genre I read often, and I prefer something more distinctive, less heroic, and with a bit of humour.

The book is well paced, the writing supports the story rather than calling attention to itself (as I said, some readers might find there is too much detail, but I doubt his fans will, and after reading the acknowledgements, it is clear that he is well-informed and has had access to first-hand information not many would have), and if you like lone heroes with a conscience, John Puller makes a pretty decent one. Recommended to those who enjoy action novels, spy novels, thrillers, and definitely to Baldacci fans. I am not sure I’d say I’ve become one of them, but I might try another one of his stories at some point.


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review 2017-06-26 16:19
This House is a Home: A story of coal mining, family and the Sengers of Stiritz - Philip Nork

This House is a Home by Phil Nork
Enriching and heartwarming story!
Last class assignment for the year and Pete has to find out about his ancestors and what better way then to go visit and talk to them.
Family, uncles and grandparents load up the car and lead to southern IL where other parts of the family live. Treasure the history of this one family and how it's portrayed to those of todays age.
Love how the author also explains what mining terms mean and how they were done.
Mining accidents and telling the time by the sun so much to this book.
Loved hearing how they use everything growing on the land.
Received this review copy from the author and this is my honest opinion.

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text 2016-07-23 10:05
How Bitcoins Earned from Bitcoin Mining are Transacted Through the Network

Bitcoins, unlike paper currencies, don't physically exist anywhere. One can talk about having bitcoins but you can never point to a specific object, a physical entity to be exact. It is not even a digital file. Instead, there are only transaction records. If you already have bitcoins after going through the set up and reading all the resources from Bitcoinmining.com and you want to make a transaction, this is how these transactions work.


A bitcoin transaction is sent to and from a bitcoin wallet. They are also digitally signed. Everyone knows the transaction and its history can be tracked starting from where the bitcoins came from. There are records between different bitcoin addresses with the balance amounts. Every transaction is stored in a blockchain or a public ledger.


There are 3 pieces of information to a transaction: an input, an amount and an output. If person C receives some bitcoins from person B, the input is the record of the bitcoin address that sent the bitcoins to person B in the first place. An amount is the amount of bitcoins sent to person C by person B. An output is person C's bitcoin address.


A bitcoin address and private key are needed in order to send bitcoins. A bitcoin address is a sequence of random letters and numbers. A private key is also a sequence of letters and numbers but is kept hidden. A bitcoin address is public while a private key is private.


So, when person B sends bitcoins to person C, person B signs in with his private key and specifies the input, amount and output. After this, he sends the bitcoin wallet to the network. Miners then verify the information, put it into a block and solve it eventually.


A transaction usually clears up after 10 minutes since miners need to verify the transaction although some transactions can be confirmed right away. There are merchants that do not let you wait. This usually happens for transactions that are of low value.


There are sometimes transaction fees but it doesn't happen always. There are also no receipts.


If you need further reading, Bitcoinmining.com just might help.

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