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review 2018-04-05 18:45
ZOMBIE BIGFOOT written and narrated by Nick Sullivan
Zombie Bigfoot (Creature Quest Series Book 1) - Nick Sullivan

 

ZOMBIE BIGFOOT isn't trying to disguise itself as literary fiction as you can tell by the title. What it promises with that shadowy cover and its campy title is creature feature fun and it delivers that in spades!

 

Sarah, a woman whose father spent a good deal of his life trying to prove that the Sasquatch exists, is now spending her time trying to do the same. Her dad did eventually meet a member of the Bigfoot family when he was injured during one of his solo expeditions. Unfortunately, although he survived his injury with a Bigfoot's help, he returned to civilization with no real proof of it, and he became the object of scorn among his peers. Sarah has now returned to the area where her father documented his encounter with a team of her own and all of the latest technology to capture any discoveries they might find. Will they finally find the evidence that Bigfoot actually exists? You will have to read this to find out!

 

I expected this book to be more fluffy than it actually was, and that was a pleasant surprise. With a cast of characters that ranged from a television survivalist, a billionaire explorer, a Shwarzenegger-like body guard and a native American tracker/guide-there were plenty of personalities and events to keep the reader occupied.

 

Even though the beginning got off to a bit of a slow start, it felt like the author began to really hit his stride once the action got going. Somehow it seemed to come through that he was having a lot of fun and that point is where the reader started having fun too. Sprinkled with humor throughout, (like referencing those beef jerky commercials), ZOMBIE BIGFOOT doesn't take itself too seriously, while delivering more than what this reader expected from your average tale of this nature.

 

Recommended for fans of creature-features!

 

Get your copy here: ZOMBIE BIGFOOT

 

 

 

*I received a free copy of this audiobook in exchange for my honest feedback. This is it.*

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review 2018-03-30 12:33
Think of Me Demon (War of the Myth #2) by Miranda Grant
Think of Me Demon (War of the Myth #2) - Miranda Grant
Think of Me Demon is the second book in the War of the Myth series, and the focus of this one is very different. Instead of being in the 'normal' world, we spend most of it in a demon stronghold, where Galvanor is being held against his will. His lifemate is a drazic demon, but it doesn't look like a happy ever after as she needs to kill him if she wants to live.
 
I LOVED this story! So very different from book one and yet with similarities too, in a good way. The story is enthralling, Galvanor's history is heartbreaking, and Matakyli is the perfect foil for him. I was pleased to see the other team members show up at the end, and Elizabeth's cameo too. It ties it all in very nicely with book one, and definitely leaves you wanting book three. 
 
With excellent descriptions and world-building, this story held my attention from beginning to end. If I did half stars (which I don't) it would be a 4.5 star read. A definite improvement upon book one - which was still an amazing read. Miranda Grant's skill in weaving a story is improving in leaps and bounds, and leaves me looking forward to Jack and Charlie's story in book three. Absolutely recommended by me.
 
* A copy of this book was provided to me with no requirements for a review. I voluntarily read this book, and my comments here are my honest opinion. *
 
Merissa
Archaeolibrarian - I Dig Good Books!

 

Source: sites.google.com/site/archaeolibrarian/merissa-reviews/thinkofmedemonwarofthemyth2bymirandagrant
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review 2018-03-11 21:48
Myth and Middle-earth
Myth & Middle-Earth: Exploring the Medieval Legends Behind J.R.R. Tolkien's Lord of the Rings - Leslie Ellen Jones

I enjoyed this book about how various mythologies and legends were re-used and presented in a new light by J. R. R. Tolkien, especially the section on drowned lands. The Celtic myths of Ireland and Wales were interesting too. There's much more inside for anyone interested in mythology and how Middle-earth reflects these. Recommended!

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review 2018-03-10 17:35
Wacky, wacky, wacky
The Power of Myth - Joseph Campbell,Bill Moyers

Some of us are old enough to remember the trash bag commercial that referred to the bargain brand as "wimpy, wimpy, wimpy."

 

 

The cheap brand broke, and all the trash spilled out.

 

With Joseph Campbell, it's wacky, wacky, wacky, and all the pretentious bullshit is falling out.

 

In the interest of disclosure, I should add that I was raised nominally Protestant, though I didn't get much education in that faith until I chose to become specifically Presbyterian in my mid-teens.  Much of my maternal family is Jewish.  So I come from a mixed and very spiritually tolerant background.  Growing up, I had friends who were Irish Catholic and went to the Catholic schools, friends who were Italian Catholic and went to public schools, friends who were Missouri Synod Lutheran and went to the Lutheran school, as well as plenty of friends whose religion was completely unknown and totally irrelevant.

 

And as I mentioned in a previous status, I have just enough background in cultural anthropology -- Malinowski and his Trobriand Islanders! -- to come to The Power of Myth with an open and curious mind.

 

The first couple of chapters irritated me.  I couldn't discern a real theme, a real thesis of what is myth, what is its power, how is that power used, by whom is it used.  Because my objective was an analysis of romance novels as myths, this was important to me. 

 

What I found through the 33% of the Kindle edition that I read was gobbledygook.  Bullshit.  Horse crap.  Garbage.

 

But I was determined to continue reading.

 

At the 30% mark, page 74, I came to this:

 

MOYERS: What do you mean? What can you make of the watch you’re wearing? What kind of mystery does it reveal?

 

CAMPBELL: It is a thing, isn’t it?

 

MOYERS: Yes.

 

CAMPBELL: Do you really know what a thing is? What supports it? It is something in time and space. Think how mysterious it is that anything should be. The watch becomes the center for a meditation, the center of the intelligible mystery of being, which is everywhere. This watch is now the center of the universe. It is the still point in the turning world.

Campbell, Joseph. The Power of Myth (p. 75). Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group. Kindle Edition.

 

At that point, the book became a wallbanger.  Campbell, whose face and mannerisms and even voice I knew from snippets of videos, had become in my mind a pompous old man demanding attention and reverence even though he was spouting obvious nonsense.

 

When I was a graduate student in about 2002, I had a seminar class of seven students with two professors.  One of them I had had before, so I was familiar with his teaching style and I had taken the class partly because of that.  The other, whom I shall call Arthur for the sake of this discussion, was unknown.  Sadly, Arthur did 95% of the teaching.  If you can call it that.

 

We had some very difficult texts by some very difficult authors: Georg Lukacz, Walter Benjamin, Michel Foucault, Terry Eagleton.  I dutifully read every assignment, even though I didn't always understand what I was reading.  I came to class prepared to ask questions, discuss ideas, listen to other interpretations.  But what happened was that Arthur took over from the moment the class started, and he never shut up.

 

Non-stop, he rambled, on and on and on and on and on and on.  If one of us raised a hand to ask a question, Arthur would say something like, "I'll get to you in a minute," and the minute became thirty.  The class was two hours long, and he frequently talked for the entire two hours, not even allowing us the customary ten-minute break in the middle.  One of the students, a full-time firefighter, occasionally fell sound asleep.  And snored.

 

Nothing fazed Arthur.  One evening I managed to demand his attention and asked, "You do all this talking, but we aren't discussing the material.  What does this stuff all mean?"

 

He laughed and replied, "Welcome to grad school."  Then he resumed his monologue on some unrelated topic.  I don't even remember the name of the course.

 

One evening Arthur opened the session with a declaration that he was not going to talk more than fifteen minutes and then would open it up for discussion.  All of us who had questions about this reading material were eager to have the chance to air our thoughts.  Arthur of course talked for the entire two hours, less maybe five minutes at the end.  By that time, no one cared.

 

I thought of him often while reading Campbell.

 

I struggled through the rest of that chapter with the watch, because I really wanted to read about "The First Storytellers" and "The Gift of the Goddess."  But I couldn't get past the absurdity of Campbell's thinking.  I felt as if I'd gone back into that seminar room in the Sands Building and Arthur was once again droning on about some stupid shit that mattered less than Rick, Ilsa, and Lazlo.

 

This morning, even though I had already DNFed The Power of Myth, I took it up again to write this review.  I skipped ahead, skimmed some of the text.

 

Campbell gives a nod to the divine feminine in the chapter "The Gift of the Goddess," and I began to have some faint hope.  Very faint.  And I was quickly relieved of even that.

 

Frequently, in the epics, when the hero is born, his father has died, or his father is in some other place, and then the hero has to go in quest of his father. In the story of the incarnation of Jesus, the father of Jesus was the father in heaven, at least in terms of the symbology. When Jesus goes to the cross, he is on the way to the father, leaving the mother behind. And the cross, which is symbolic of the earth, is the mother symbol. So on the cross, Jesus leaves his body on the mother, from whom he has acquired his body, and he goes to the father, who is the ultimate transcendent mystery source.

Campbell, Joseph. The Power of Myth (p. 208). Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group. Kindle Edition.

 

I added the emphasis, because plainly Campbell still privileges the masculine over the feminine, no matter what he says in other places to the contrary.  And he still privileges the strict duality, despite dismissing it often enough . . . in theory.

 

There was a temptation to give this one or one-half or even no stars, but I went with one and a half because the negative lessons were somewhat worth it.  I still have some old anthro books that might give better insights into the value and true power of myth.  Campbell sure as hell didn't.

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text 2018-03-10 05:28
Reading progress update: I've read 30%. And DNF
The Power of Myth - Joseph Campbell,Bill Moyers

I know I said I was going to finish it, but I changed my mind because things.

 

When Campbell asks how do we know what "a thing" is and never answered except to go about how every "thing" is the center of the universe, um, no.

 

I ordered The Hero with a Thousand Faces from the library. The Power of Myth is just    . . . .  bullshit.

 

Now I'm going to find something fun to read.

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