logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: quote
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-07-11 19:07
LOVE

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text SPOILER ALERT! 2018-05-22 11:15
QUOTE: The Evolution Underground [Chapter 4]
The Evolution Underground: Burrows, Bunkers, and the Marvelous Subterranean World Beneath our Feet - Anthony J. Martin

"If too many documentary films and cartoons about the 1.4-meter (4.5-foot) tall emperor penguins (Aptenodytes forsteri) of Antarctica have colored your perception of penguins, fairy penguins will surprise you, and in a good way. Once they stand up on a beach, their overwhelming cuteness may very well compel you to babble an infantile string of nonsensical monosyllables while dissolving into a puddle of goo. First of all, these are the smallest of penguins, with adults reaching about 30 centimeters (12 inches), one third the height of the Star Wars droid R2D2. Second, their backs are composed of nearly iridescent-blue feathers, their bellies are white, and their cheeks have just a hint of blush, a plumage contrasting with that of the severe black-and-white tuxedo outfits worn by their southernmost relatives.

 

Further adding to their charm, fairy penguins hold their thin black wings out from their sides as they walk with webbed feet, looking as if they are performing a balancing act; which in effect they are, because they would easily topple over at the slightest push. (Please don’t do this, though. Remember: overwhelming cuteness.) All of these traits are endearing enough in any given penguin, but when multiplied by hundreds, all of them baby-stepping out of the surf together and looking like one big happy family, it is enough to elicit squeaks and squeals from even the most hardened anti-penguin cynics. No wonder, then, that a longtime fairy penguin colony on the seashore of Phillip Island in Victoria, Australia, has become a huge tourist attraction. Throughout each year, hundreds of thousands of fellow biped admirers gather nightly to watch the hundreds of these birds ambling up the beach in a “penguin parade.”"

From:  The Evolution Underground by Anthony J. Martin

 

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text SPOILER ALERT! 2018-05-22 11:05
QUOTE: The Evolution Underground [Chapter 1]
The Evolution Underground: Burrows, Bunkers, and the Marvelous Subterranean World Beneath our Feet - Anthony J. Martin

If this use of alligator dens doesn’t impress as a form of protection, then think of alligator babies. That’s right: cute little alligator babies, which easily fit on the palm of an average adult human hand when newly hatched. Only later do they grow up to become monsters—much like how human children eventually turn into teenagers. Despite being so adorable, nearly everything bigger than a baby alligator—including other alligators—regards it as an appetizer. Hence these little tykes need defending, which is partially provided by their overprotective mothers, but also by dens. Alligator mothers stay with their offspring for as long as two years after they hatch, and if dens are nearby, they will use these not only as places with plenty of fresh water (which baby alligators need), but also for hiding the kids from trouble.

 

From:  The Evolution Underground by Anthony J. Martin

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text SPOILER ALERT! 2018-05-22 11:00
QUOTE: The Evolution Underground [Chapter 1]
The Evolution Underground: Burrows, Bunkers, and the Marvelous Subterranean World Beneath our Feet - Anthony J. Martin

Once spotted, I greeted it like an old friend, enthusiastically striding toward its opening before delivering my little lecture to the assembled group. A few students stood back, impressed by the size of the hole and staring into its underground darkness, a seemingly bottomless pit of mystery. The whirring of zoom lenses and digitally rendered shutter sounds behind me told me they were taking plenty of pictures. I was pleased that they found this burrow as interesting as I did.

Suddenly, I was jarred out of my educational reverie when one of students said, “I see teeth in there.”

“Teeth?” I asked.

“Yeah,” she said, and others nodded agreement. She was looking into the den, while two others looked anxiously back and forth between their camera view-screens and the den, testing what they either observed or imagined.

“What kind of teeth?” I asked. Like a typical paleontologist, I was thinking of a disembodied skull or jaw, instead of a breathing animal bearing (or baring) those teeth.

“I don’t know. Could it be a snake?”

“Sure, that’s possible.” I had seen alligator dens with snakes in them before. Also, unlike certain fictional archaeologists, I like snakes and relished the thought that one might be in the burrow. “But you probably wouldn’t be seeing its teeth,” I said, as I became more confused about this unexpected shift in the lesson plan for my students. Puzzled, I stepped closer to the entrance, which is when I received an admonition from their “classmate” who had somehow (but understandably) made it past the registrar without paying tuition.

I looked up at Michael. The disbelief probably still registered on my face, but my expression also must have wordlessly asked him, “What do we do now?”

With his GPS unit in one hand, Michael smiled, and with barely suppressed glee at the absurdity of our predicament he said, “Guess we have to mark that one as occupied.”

 

From:  The Evolution Underground by Anthony J. Martin

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text SPOILER ALERT! 2018-05-22 10:45
QUOTE: The Evolution Underground [Chapter 3]
The Evolution Underground: Burrows, Bunkers, and the Marvelous Subterranean World Beneath our Feet - Anthony J. Martin

"Just how did the ancestors of both land- and sea-dwelling turtles manage to make it through three heinous events in the history of life and still be around today? If you thought I was going to say “burrowing,” you would be right, but it gets more complicated than that. After all, though a few turtles use burrows for estivation and others for homes, most turtles do not live in burrows at all. For example, nobody is suggesting that Cretaceous sea turtles dug out submarine burrows to wait out an upcoming apocalypse. So rather than making homes, turtles have used underground environments in another way to save themselves and future generations: by female turtles burying their eggs".

From:  The Evolution Underground by Anthony J. Martin

 

 

 

OTHER RECOMMENDED BOOK:

 

Voyage of the Turtle: In Pursuit of the Earth's Last Dinosaur by Carl Safina

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?