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review 2018-12-13 19:49
Subspace tunnel sounds like a euphemism
Mere Mortals - David Mack

Star Trek Destiny #2: Mere Mortals by David Mack continues the trilogy that I began discussing on Monday. We find our crews separated across not only vast distances but also by time itself. Hernandez and 3 members of her crew are stranded with the Caeliar in the 1500s trying to find a suitable planet to inhabit without any hope of returning to their lives back on Earth in their time. Riker and the crew of Titan have reached the homeworld of the Caeliar in the present day and things do not go according to plan...in fact events quickly snowball out of Riker's control. Meanwhile, Picard and Dax are going through subspace tunnels in the style of eeny, meeney, miney, moe trying to find the one which will lead them to the Borg's point of origin and hopefully onto a path of defeating them. 

 

The best parts of this installment were those which followed Hernandez's struggles to adjust to her new existence and the glimpses of the Federation President scrabbling to put together a formidable force to defeat the approaching Borg Armada. There are two reasons I think that I preferred these two storylines: I still haven't watched Nemesis and still feel confused by this reality and Mack's depiction of familiar faces did not sit right with me particularly in regards to Picard. Sometimes I find that the best Star Trek novelizations are the ones where the author focuses more on the storyline element and less on the characters which the audience typically knows really well. In this case, Mack's description of the Caeliar race and their culture coupled with the (unknown to me at least) Captain Hernandez and her never-ending quest to escape/understand her captors was exactly what I wanted in a great sci-fi novel. Conversely, the dramatic characterization of Riker's faltering marriage and Picard's inner struggles against the Borg felt stilted and forced. 

 

By this point, I was way too invested not to continue so if you're wondering how I felt about the conclusion you can check back next week for that (although hopefully you're checking every day (-:). 7/10 for book 2 in this trilogy.

 

What's Up Next: The Fourth Age: Smart Robots, Conscious Computers, and the Future of Humanity by Byron Reese

 

What I'm Currently Reading: Guns, Germs, and Steel by Jared Diamond and The Science of Supervillains by Lois H. Gresh & Robert Weinberg

Source: readingfortheheckofit.blogspot.com
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review 2018-12-13 00:02
Which would you choose: Mortal or magic?
Chilling Adventures of Sabrina Vol. 1 - Jack Morelli,Robert Hack,Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa

Chilling Adventures of Sabrina Vol. 1 by Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa came onto my radar because I saw the super edgy trailer for the Netflix show and of course I felt I needed to at least read the first volume (containing the first 6 issues) before I started in on the show. :-P [A/N: For those unaware, this alternate reality version of Sabrina exists in the same realm as Archie and his pals over in Riverdale and you can keep your eyes peeled for my review of that too.] This is a comic book series that takes the familiar character of Sabrina Spellman (Remember that cute show about witchy magic with that super sarcastic talking cat named Salem?) and turns it onto its head. This is Dark Stuff and trust me the capitalization is warranted. The story starts out with Sabrina's parents, Warlock Dad and Mortal Mom, who disagree on how to raise their newborn daughter. According to coven law, Sabrina should be blessed by Satan so that when she comes of age she can formally sign Satan's book and give her soul over to him. (Did I mention this was dark?) These parental disagreements result in the mother being driven insane and Sabrina being entrusted to her witchy aunts to be raised 'properly'. So now Sabrina walks in two worlds (witch at home and mortal at school) and by the time she is 16 (present day in the comics where it's the 1960s) she is thoroughly confused about where she fits in which is par for the course with most teenagers if we're completely honest. Gore, violence, Satanism, cannibalism, necromancy, first love...your standard high school experience. The artwork was unlike anything I'd ever consumed in a comic or graphic novel medium before with bold colors and almost grotesque characterizations. I dug it. Horror fans and those that like re-imaginings of familiar tales will enjoy the world that Aguirre-Sacasa has crafted immensely. Yes, it's Dark Stuff but it's also boldly imaginative and well-formed. He's not only crafted this but another series called Afterlife with Archie (not to mention the tv series Riverdale). This is an author to watch! 10/10

 

PS Salem the cat is in this version as well!

 

PPS I started the series and I'm digging that too!

 

Not too spoiler-y since it's from the beginning. [Source: The Mary Sue]

 

What's Up Next: Star Trek Destiny #2: Mere Mortals by David Mack

 

What I'm Currently Reading: Guns, Germs, and Steel by Jared Diamond and The Science of Supervillains by Lois H. Gresh & Robert Weinberg

Source: readingfortheheckofit.blogspot.com
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review 2018-12-10 02:21
A Good Time (The O'Learys, #2) by Shannyn Schroeder
A Good Time (O'Learys) - Shannyn Schroeder

 

"Don't judge a book by it's cover." I've heard that adage so much, it's almost cliche, but the best cliches have a hint of truth to them. Schroeder puts her own spin on a saying we hear, yet chose to ignore. A Good Time is a look at the impact image has on everyday life. Griffin and Indy think with their hearts and many a time that has not proved wise. When the time comes for them to chose between what they want and what others say, will each have the courage to make the right choice? Shannyn Schroeder found a deliciously, tempting way to warm hearts and deliver an entertaining story with a powerful message.

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review 2018-12-05 21:26
MunMun
Munmun - Jesse Andrews

[I received a copy of this book through NetGalley, in exchange for an honest review.]

I admit I skim-read the last 25%; I tried to read more carefully, but at this point, either I skimmed or I DNFed, and I don’t like DNFing.

It is not without good ideas and potential, and it delivers good criticism of a society based on money: in this case, money literally defines your weight in the world, since the poorest people are tiny and get squished by just about anything and anyone, while the richest ones are so big that they tower over everyone and take a lot of space. The plight of the characters, too—the way they have to fight, the desperate schemes they come up with, are (unfortunately, realistically) close to reality, in that when you don’t have much, no matter how you try, your attempts are conditioned by the little means you have. (I do agree that “you have to make efforts to achieve your dreams”, but let’s be honest, it’s very easy to give lessons about how you managed to buy the house of your dreams when you got a nifty inheritance from your grandparents. Prayer’s plan to find herself a husband, as harebrained as it is, does reflect a desperate attempt at doing something with nothing.)

However, I couldn’t really connect with the characters, nor get into the writing style, which tends to combine words together. I get it, I get why it’s done, but for me, it’s jarring (took me a bit of time to realise that the “munmun” of the title is money, although that was because I wasn’t pronouncing it, only reading it at first). It’s like all those cutesy words like ‘preloved’ and ‘choccy’ and all that stuff which, for some reason, is considered as witty, but just falls flat as far as I’m concerned. After a while, I lose interest.

More like 1.5 stars for me, however, I do acknowledge that there are good ideas in here.

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text 2018-12-05 17:37
Czytniki marki PocketBook oficjalnie na RYNKU AMERYKAŃSKIM

Stany Zjednoczone to najbogatszy i najlepiej rozwinięty rynek książek elektronicznych. Jest równocześnie zdominowany przez księgarnię Amazon i jej czytniki – Kindle. Nie jest to rynek łatwy, o czym przekonuje się na własnej skórze choćby największa tamtejsza sieć księgarska – Barnes and Noble. Jej dział związany z czytnikami i e-bookami zmaga się w ostatnich latach z ciągłymi kłopotami i widmem zamknięcia – oddania pola Amazonowi. Również operujący z Kanady Rakuten Kobo, w walce o amerykańskich klientów, nie stanął w szranki sam. Chcąc zwiększyć szanse zaistnienia w Stanach, zawiązał sojusz handlowy z największą siecią sklepów – Walmart. Krótko rzecz ujmując - nie ma letko.

 

PocketBook Aqua 2 w ofercie sklepu Good e-Reader (źródło: goodereader.com/blog/shop)

 

Do gry dołączy kolejna marka. Dziś pojawiła się w sieci informacja, że kanadyjski serwis e-bookowy Good e-Reader, zajmie się od teraz dystrybucją czytników marki PocketBook. Czytniki mają trafiać głównie do klientów ze Stanów Zjednoczonych i Kanady. Serwis jest autoryzowanym sprzedawcą na terenie dwóch krajów. W oficjalnej informacji podano, że można PocketBooki zamawiać także z innych regionów.

 

Obecnie oferowane są oficjalnie prawie wszystkie modele z bieżącej oferty producenta: PocketBook Aqua 2, PocketBook Touch HD 2, PocketBook Touch Lux 4, PocketBook Basic Lux 2 oraz PocketBook InkPad 3. Michael Kozlowski (współtwórca serwisu Good e-Reader) napisał, że PocketBooki to solidne urządzenia i podkreślił, że mają fizyczne przyciski zmiany stron. Od strony oprogramowania pochwalił stabilność oprogramowania wewnętrznego tych czytników. Bez szerokiego marketingu i powiązania czytników z anglojęzyczną księgarnią, trudno spodziewać się wielkiego sukcesu. Ale to i tak ciekawa opcja, bo do tej pory Good e-Reader zajmował się sprzedażą raczej dość egzotycznych androidowych urządzeń, na przykład chińskich czytników pod własną marką czy urządzeń marki Onyx Boox.

 

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